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THE J©HM CMJBMAM^ j 
ILJBIRAJOf ® CHICAGO J | 

PRESENTED BY* 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/catalogfor19151918univ 



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THE MAINE BULLETIN 



VOL. XVIII 



DECEMBER, 19IS ' '•' I , U-O.'A' 



CATALOG 



OF THE 



University of Maine 




1915 - 1916 



Published monthly during the academic year by the University 
Entered at the Orono post office as second class matter 





KEY TO MAT 

1 Athletic Field 

2 Grand Stand 

:: Beta Theta Pi House 
\ Tennis Courts 
5 Pumping Station 
Janitor's House 

7 Oak Hall 

8 Wingate Hall 

9 Fernald Hall 

10 Power House 

11 Alumni Hall 

12 Carpenter Shop 

13 Coburn Hall 

14 President's House 

15 Observatory 

16 Horticultural Building 

17 Holmes Hall 

18 Home Economics 

Laboratory 

19 Stable . 

20 Dairy Building 

21 Barns 

22 Farm Superintend- 

ent's House 

23 Professor's House 

24 Kappa Sigma House 

25 Mt. Vernon House 

26 Phi Gamma Delta 

House 

27 B. O. & O. Waiting 

Rooms 

28 Lord Hall 

29 North Hall 

30 Phi Kappa Sigma House 

31 Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

House 

32 Store House 

33 Infirmary 
34 Library 

35 Farm Buildings 
36 Heating Plant 
7T Winslow Hall 
38 Theta Chi House 
39 Phi Eta Kappa 
House 

40 Stock Judging 
Pavilion 

41 Delta Tau Delta 
House 

42 Hannibal Ham 
lin Hall 
43 Professors' 
Houses 
44 EstabrookeHall 
45 BalentineHall 
46 Baseball 
Grand 
Stand 
47 AubertHall 



1 



43 A3 




CATALOG OF THE 



UNIVERSITY OF NTAINE 



1915-1916 




ORONO, MAINE 



Printed for the University 
WATERVILXE 
SENTINEL PUBLISHING COMPANY 
1915 





1915 ' c ' 

T'LY 


1916 


1916 • 


1917 




j*n-:apy 


JULY 


JANUARY 




S M T TV T . V S i 


s ( ai *t : V T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 8 




1 2 A 

4 5 6 7'8 l '9 r l& 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


: .;. ,.„'. .. i 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
i 30 31 


1 


.. 12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 




2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 




AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 




S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 




12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 


.... 1 2 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 


.... 12 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 . . 


12 3 

'4 5 '6789 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 . . 




SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 




S M T W T F S 


8 M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 




12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 . . 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 . . 


12 


12 




3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 1£ 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
1/ 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 




OCTOBER 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 




S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


3 M T W T F 8 




1 2 


1 


12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 


.. 12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 




3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 

NOVEMBER 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 

MAY 






1 

NOVEMBER 


MAY 




g If T W T F 8 


| S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 8 


S M T W T F 8 




..123456 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 


.. 12 3 4 5 6 
i 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
! 21 22 23 24 25 26 2? 
| 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 . . 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 . . 




DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 




B II T w X I - 


8 M T W T I'" 8 


8 M T W T F S 


8 M T W T F S 




1 2 3 4 

; s g lo ii 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 .. 


1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 IS 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 . , 


1 2 


j 




3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 IS 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 2/ 28 29 
30 1 









CALENDAR 



September 10-14, 

September 15, 

September 16, 

November 25, 

December 22, 



FALL SEMESTER, 1915 

Arrearage examinations; entrance 
examinations 
Wednesday, Registration begins, 8.00 A. M. 

Thursday, Registration; first chapel, 10.30 A. m. 

Thursday, Thanksgiving Day, a holiday 

Wednesday, Christmas recess begins, 5.05 p. M. 



January 
January 



January 29, 

January 3 1 , 

February 22, 

March 22, 

March 

April 

May 



June 
June 
June 
June 
June 



30, 
30, 



12, 

i3» 



1916 

Thursday, Christmas recess ends, 8.00 A. m. 

Friday, Fall semester ends, 5.05 p. M. 

SPRING SEMESTER, 1916 

Saturday, Registration 

Monday, Spring semester begins, 8.00 a. m. 

Tuesday, Washington's Birthday, a holiday 

Wednesday, Spring recess begins, 5.05 p. M. 

Thursday, Spring recess ends, 8.00 a. m. 

Wednesday, Patriot's Day, a holiday 

Tuesday, Memorial Day 

Entrance examinations 

Sunday, Baccalaureate address 

Monday, Class Day 

Tuesday, Meeting of Board of Trustees 

Wednesday, Commencement, 9.30 a. m. 



June 
August 



26, 

4> 



SUMMER TERM 



Monday, 
Friday, 



m a 



a 



Summer Term begins, 8.00 A. m. 
Summer Term ends . /><-, 

3 n x\ 

39S373 



University of Maine 



September 15-19, 

September 20, 

September 21, 

November 30, 

December 20, 



FALL SEMESTER, 1916 

Arrearage examinations; entrance 
examinations 
Wednesday, Registration begins, 8.00 a. m. 

Thursday, Registration; first chapel, 10.30 a. m. 

Thursday, Thanksgiving Day, a holiday 

Wednesday, Christmas recess begins, 12.00 m. 



January 4, 

February 2, 



February 3, 
February 5, 



June 



1917 

Thursday, Christmas recess ends, 8.00 a. m. 

Friday, Fall semester ends 5.05 p. m. 

SPRING SEMESTER, 1917 

Saturday, Registration 

Monday, Spring semester begins, 8 a.m. 

Wednesday, Commencement 



Hoard of Trustees 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Hon. SAMUEL WADSWORTH GOULD, B. S., President Skowhegan 

Term expires April 16, 1921 
EDWIN JAMES HASKELL, B. S. Westbrook 

Term expires December 31, 1916 
Hon. CHARLES LESTER JONES Corinna 

Term expires April 17, 1917 
FREELAND JONES, LL. B. Bangor 

Term expires May 31, 1918 
CHARLES SWAN BICKFORD, B. S. Belfast 

Term expires April 13, 1919 
WILLIAM ALBERT MARTIN, Clerk Houlton 

Term expires May 7, 1920 
Hon. WILLIAM HENRY LOONEY Portland 

Term expires September 10, 1921 
Hon. FREDERIC HASTINGS STRICKLAND Bangor 

Term expires April 28, 1922 



Executive Committee: Gould, F. Jones, and Strickland 
Farm Committee: F. Jones, C. L. Jones, and Martin 



University of Maine 



MAINE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT 
STATION COUNCIL 



ROBERT JUDSON ALEY, Ph. D., LL. D. President 

CHARLES DAYTON WOODS, Sc. D. Secretary 

FREELAXD JONES, LL. B., Bangor \ Committee 

CHARLES LESTER JONES, Corinna [• of 

WILLIAM ALBERT MARTIN, Houlton \ Trustees 

LEON STEPHEN MERRILL, M. D., Orono 

Dean of the College of Agriculture 
WILLIAM TRELAWNEY GUPTILL, A. B., Topsham 

Commissioner of Agriculture 
EUGENE HARVEY LIBBY, Auburn State Grange 

HOWARD LINCOLN KEYSER, Greene State Pomological Society 
FRANK SAMUEL ADAMS, Bowdoinhani State Dairymen's Association 
WILLIAM GEORGE HUNTON, Cherryfield 

Maine Seed Improvement Association 
LEONARD CLEMENT HOLSTON, Cornish 

Maine Livestock Breeders' Association 



JAMES MONROE BARTLETT, M. S. 
EDITH MARION PATCH, Ph. D. 
WARNER JACKSON MORSE, Ph. D. 
RAYMOND PEARL, Ph. D. 
MERMAN HERBERT HANSON, M. S. 
FRANK MACY SURFACE, Ph. D. 



1 



Members 

of the 

Station Staff 



Officers of Administration 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



OF THE UNIVERSITY 

ROBERT JUDSON ALEY, President 
JAMES NORRIS HART, Dean 
CHARLES JOHN DUNN, Treasurer 
JAMES ADRIAN GANNETT, Registrar 

OF THE COLLEGES AND EXPERIMENT STATION 

LEON STEPHEN MERRILL, Dean of the College of Agriculture 
JAMES STACY STEVENS, Dean of the College of Arts and 

Sciences 
CHARLES DAYTON WOODS, Director of the Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station 
WILLIAM EMANUEL WALZ, Dean of the College of Law 
HAROLD SHERBURNE BOARDMAN, Dean of the College of 
Technology 

OF OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

RALPH KNEELAND JONES, Librarian 

EDGAR RAMEY WINGARD, Director of Athletics 

FRANK SHELDON CLARK, In Charge of Military Instruction 



University of Maine 



^FACULTY OF INSTRUCTION AND 
INVESTIGATION 



PROFESSORS 

ROBERT JUDSON ALEY Campus 

President 
A. B., Indiana University, 1888; A. M., 1890; Ph. D., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1897; LL. D., Franklin College, 1909 

MERRITT CALDWELL FERNALD 54 Main Street 

Emeritus Professor of Philosophy 

A. B., Bowdoin College, 1861 ; A. M., 1864; Ph. D., 1881 ; LL. D., 1902, 
also University of Maine, 1908 

JAMES MONROE BARTLETT College Street 

Chemist in the Agricultural Experiment Station 

B. S., University of Maine, 1880; M. S., 1883 

LUCIUS HERBERT MERRILL 100 Main Street 

Professor of Biological and Agricultural Chemistry 
B. S., University of Maine, 1883; Sc. D., 1908 
JAMES NORRIS HART College Street 

Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy 
Dean of the University 
B. C. E., University of Maine, 1885; C. E., 1890; M. S., University of 
Chicago, 1897; Sc. D., University of Maine, 1908 

FREMOXT LINCOLN RUSSELL 80 Main Street 

Professor of Bacteriology and Veterinary Science 
B. S., University of Maine, 1885; V. S., New York College of Vet- 
erinary Surgeons, 1886 

♦Arranged in groups in order of seniority of appointment 

8 



Faculty 

JAMES STACY STEVENS 99 Main Street 

Professor of Physics 
Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 
B. S., University of Rochester, 1885; M. S., 1888; also Syracuse Uni- 
versity, 1889; LL. D., University of Rochester, 1907 
CHARLES DAYTON WOODS 55 Main Street 

Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station 
B. S., Wesleyan University. 1880; Sc. D., University of Maine, 1905 
JOHN HOMER HUDDILSTON 105 Main Street 

Professor of Greek and Classical Archeology 
A. B., Baldwin University, 1890; also Harvard University, 1893; Ph. D., 
University of Munich, 1897 

WILLIAM EMANUEL WALZ 8 Fifth Street, Bangor 

Professor of Law 

Dean of the College of Law 

A. B., Northwestern College, 1880; A. M., 1882; LL. B., Harvard Uni- 
versity, 1889; Litt. D., Bowdoin College, 191 1 

RALPH KNEELAND JONES 26 Bennoch Street 

Librarian 

B. S., University of Maine, 1886 

JACOB BERNARD SEGALL 1 Mill Street 

Professor of French 
B. S. and B. L., University of Yassy, 1884; Ph. D., Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1893 

HAROLD SHERBURNE BOARDMAN 40 Main Street 

Professor and Head of the Department of Civil Engineering 

Dean of the College of Technology 

B. C. E., University of Maine, 1895; C. E., 1898 

GEORGE DAVIS CHASE 59 Main Street 

Professor of Latin 

A. B., Harvard University, 1889; A. M., 1895; Ph. D., 1897 

CAROLINE COLVIN University Inn 

Professor of History 

A. B., Indiana University, 1893; Ph- D., University of Pennsylvania, 
1901 

WARNER JACKSON MORSE 33 North Main Street 

Plant Pathologist in the Agricultural Experiment Station 

B. S., University of Vermont, 1898; M. S., 1903; Ph. D., University of 
Wisconsin, 1912 



University of Maine 

CHARLES PARTRIDGE WESTON College Street 

Professor of Mechanics and Drawing 
B. C. E., University of Maine, 1896; C. E., 1899; A. M., Columbia 
University, 1902 

RAYMOND PEARL College Street 

Biologist in the Agricultural Experiment Station 

A. B., Dartmouth College, 1899; Ph. D., University of Michigan, 1902 
CHARLES BARTO BROWN 83 Main Street 

Professor of Railroad Engineering 
Ph. B., Yale University, 1894; C. E., 1896 
WALLACE CRAIG College Street 

Professor of Philosophy 

B. S., University of Illinois, 1898; M. S., 1901 ; Ph. D., University of 
Chicago, 1908 

ROLAND PALMER GRAY College Street 

Professor and Head of the Department of English 
B. A., Columbia University, 1893; M. A. University of Rochester, 1908 
RALPH HARPER McKEE College Street 

Professor of Chemistry 
A. B., University of Wooster, 1895; A. M., 1897; Ph. D., University of 
Chicago, 1901 

GARRETT WILLIAM THOMPSON 53 Main Street 

Professor of German 
A. B., Amherst College, 1888; A. M., 1891 ; Ph. D., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1907 

GUY ANDREW THOMPSON College Street 

Professor of English Literature 

A. B., University of Illinois, 1898; also Harvard University, 1900; 
A. M., 1901 ; Ph. D., University of Chicago, 1912 

WINDSOR PRATT DAGGETT College Street 

Professor of Public Speaking 

Ph. !>., Brown University, 1902 

M1NTIN ASBURY CHRYSLER College Street 

Professor of Biology 

B. A., Toronto University, 1894; Ph. D., University of Chicago, 1904 
JOHN MANVERS BRISCOE College Street 

Professor of Forestry 
M. F., Yale University, 1909 



IO 



Faculty 

LEON STEPHEN MERRILL Campus 

Director of Agricultural Extension Service 
Dean of the College of Agriculture 
M. D., Bowdoiin College, 1889 
EDGAR RAMEY WIXGARD 46 Main Street 

Professor of Physical Culture 
Director of Athletics 
B, S., Susquehanna University, 1900; M. S., University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1902 

GEORGE EDWARD SIMMONS 2 Forest Avenue 

Professor of Agronomy 
B. S., Ohio Northern University, 1902; M. S., 1905; B. Sc, Ohio 
State University, 1909 

GEORGE WARE STEPHENS 76 North Main Street 

Professor of Economics and Sociology 
Ph. B., Iowa W T esleyan College, 1904; M. A., University of Wisconsin, 
1907; Ph. D., 191 1 

WILLIAM EDWARD BARROWS, Jr. Myrtle Street 

Professor of Electrical Engineering 

B. S., University of Maine, 1902; E. E., 1908 

EDGAR MYRICK SIMPSON 31 Highland Avenue, Bangor 

Professor of Law 

A. B., Bowdoin College, 1894 

BLISS S BROWN Forest Avenue 

Professor of Horticulture 

B. S., Michigan Agricultural College, 1903; M. S., University of Cali- 
fornia, 191 1 

EDITH MARION PATCH College Street 

Entomologist in the Experiment Station 
B. S., University of Minnesota, 1901 ; M. S., University of Maine, 1910; 
Ph. D., Cornell University, ion 

FRANK MACY SURFACE^ Bennoch Street 

Biologist in the Agricultural Experiment Station 

A. B., Ohio State University, 1904 ; A. M., 1905 ; Ph. D., University 
of Pennsylvania, 1907 

LAMERT SEYMOUR CORBETT Campus 

Professor of Animal Industry 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1909; M. S., State Univer- 
sity of Kentucky, 1913 



II 



University of Maine 

FRANK SHELDON CLARK 97 Main Street 

Professor of Military Science and Tactics 
B. S., Norwich University, 1909; First Lieutenant, Coast Artillery 
Corps, U. S. Army 

ANDREW PAUL RAGGIO 102 Main Street 

Professor of Spanish and Italian 
B. A., University of Texas, 1896; A. M., Harvard University, 1902; 
Ph. D., 1904 

FRANCES ROWLAND FREEMAN University Inn 

Professor of Home Economics 
B. Sc, Ohio State University, 1910; M. Sc, 191 1 
ROY FRANKLIN RICHARDSON 23 Mill Street 

Professor of Education 
A. B., Kansas State Normal College, 1909; Ph. D., Clark University, 
1913 

WILLIAM JORDAN SWEETSER 57 Main Street 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
S. B., [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1901 



HERMAN HERBERT HANSON 43 Forest Avenue 

Associate Chemist in the Agricultural Experiment Station 

B. S., Pennsylvania State College, 1902; M. S., University of Maine, 
19C6 

CHARLES WILSON EASLEY 7 Main Street 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 
A. B., Dickinson College, 1897; A. M., 1890; Ph. D., Clark University, 
1008 

EDSON FOBES HITCHINGS 2 Summer Street 

Associate Professor of Horticulture 

C. E., University of Maine, 1875; M. S.,1889 

LEON ELMER WOODMAN 28 Bennoch Street 

Associate Professor of Physics 

A. B., Dartmouth College, 1899; A. M., 1902; Ph. D., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1910 

JAMES ADRIAN GANNETT 97 Main Street 

Registrar 

B. S., University of Maine, 1908 

ALBERT THEODORE CHILDS 55 Main Street 

Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B. S.. W rcester Polytechnic fnstitute, 1906; E. E., 1908 

12 



Faculty 

GEORGE HENRY WORSTER 234 Center Street, Bangor 

Associate Professor of Law 

LL. B., University of Maine, 1905; LL. M., 1906 

HARLEY RICHARD WILLARD 32 Main Street 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

A. B., Dartmouth College, 1899; M. A., 1902; also Yale University, 
1910; Ph. D., 1912 

ARCHER LEWIS GROVER 18 North Main Street 

Associate Professor of Drawing 

B. M. E., University of Maine, 1889; B. S., 1902 

ALICE MIDDLETON BORING 13 Mill Street 

Associate Professor of Zoology 

A. B., Bryn Mawr College, 1904; A. M., 1905; Ph. D., 1910 
WILLIAM AMBROSE JARRETT Forest Avenue 

Associate Professor of Pharmacy 
Pharm. D., Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 1913 
JULIUS ERNEST KAULFUSS Main Street 

Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 

B. S., University of Wisconsin, 1908 

JAMES McCLUER MATTHEWS 35 North Main Street 

Associate Professor of Economics and Sociology 

A. B., Park College, 1903; A. M., Harvard University, 1913 

DANIEL WILSON PEARCE 11 Mill Street 

Associate Professor of Education 

A. B., Indiana University, 1910; A. M., 1912 

ROBERT RUTHERFORD DRUMMOND 80 North Main Street 

Associate Professor of German 

B. S., University of Maine, 1905 ; Ph. D., University of Pennsylvania, 
1909 

CARL HENRY LEKBERG Forest Avenue 

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B. S., University of Maine, 1907 
EMBERT HIRAM SPRAGUE University Inn 

Acting Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
B. S., Dartmouth College, 1900 
TRUMAN LEIGH HAMLIN Stillwater 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
A. B., Western Reserve University, 1899; M. A., University of 
Missouri, 1902 



13 



University of Maine 

BARTLETT BROOKS 19 North Park, Bangor 

Assistant Professor of Law 

A. B., Harvard University, 1899; LL. B., 1902 

HARRY NEWTON CONSER Oak Street 

Assistant Professor of Botany 

B. S., Central Pennsylvania College, 1883; M. S., 1886; A. M., Har- 
vard University, 1908 

LLOYD MEEKS BURGHART Forest Avenue 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

A. B., Lake Forest College, 1906; M. A., University of Maine, 191 1 
RALPH WOODBURY REDMAN 10 Myrtle Street 

Assistant Director of Agricultural Extension Service 

B. S., University of Maine, 1912 

HAROLD SCOTT OSLER 22 Main Street 

Assistant Professor of Agronomy 
B. S., Muskingum College, 1909; also Michigan Agricultural Col- 
lege, 1913 

RAYMOND HARMAN ASHLEY Forest Avenue 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
B. Sc, Rutgers College, 1903; M. A., Yale University, 1905; Ph. D., 
1906 

ALBERT GUY DURGIN Middle Street 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
B. S., University of Maine, 1908; M. S. 1909 
ALPHEUS CROSBY LYON 1 Bennoch Street 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 
B. S., University of Maine, 1902; S. B., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, 1904; C. E., University of Maine, 1913 
LOWELL JACOB REED College Street 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B. S., University of Maine, 1907; M. S., 1912 ; Ph. D., University of 
Pennsylvania, 19T5 

HARRY WOODBURY SMITH 1 Forest Avenue 

Assistant Professor of Bacteriology 

B. S., University of Maine, 1909 

CARLETON WHIDDEN EATON Mill Street 

Assistant Professor of Forestry 

A. B., Bowdoin College, 1910; M. F., Yale University, 1912 



14 



Faculty 

RALPH MAYNARD HOLMES 115 Main Street 

Assistant Professor of Physics 
B. A., University of Maine, 191 1; M. A., Wesleyan University, 1913 
JOSEPH NEWELL STEPHENSON Gilbert Street 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
S. B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1909; M. S., Rose 
Polytechnic Institute, 191 1 

BURNETT OLCOTT McANNEY University Inn 

Assistant Professor of English 

A. B., Dickinson College, 1913 ; B. Lit., Columbia University, 1914 
FRANCES MARIA WHITCOMB University Inn 

Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

B. S., Simmons College, 1910 

HAROLD JOSEPH SHAW Bath 

Extension Representative, Sagadahoc County 

CLARENCE WALLACE BARBER Portland 

Extension Representative, Cumberland County 

B. S., University of Maine, 1912; M. S., 1914 

CLARENCE ALBERT DAY Machias 

Extension Representative, Washington County 

ARTHUR LOWELL DEERING Augusta 

Extension Representative, Kennebec County 

B. S., University of Maine, 1912 

MORRIS DANIEL JONES Forest Avenue 

Extension Representative, Penobscot County 

B. S., University of Maine, 1912 

GEORGE ALBERT YEATON Norway 

Extension Representative, Oxford County 

WILSON MONTGOMERY MORSE Farmington 

Extension Representative, Hancock County 

B. S., University of Maine, 1914 

HAROLD HARLAN NASH Sanford 

Extension Representative, York County 

GEORGE NEWTON WORDEN Ellsworth 

Extension Representative, Hancock County 

B. S., University of Maine, 1913 

RALPH PIKE MITCHELL 3 Pond Street 

In charge of Boys Agricultural Club Work • 



15 



University of Maine 

.MARIE WILHEMINA GURDY University Inn 

In Charge of Girls Agricultural Club Work 
B. S., Simmons College, 1913 
WILLIAM COLLINS MONAHAN 2 Bennoch Street 

In Charge of Poultry Extension Work 
B. S., University of Maine, 1914 
PAUL WHEELER MONOHON 108 Hannibal Hamlin Hall 

Assistant State Leader, Farm Demonstration Work 
B. S., University of Maine, 1914 
JOSEPH HENRY BODWELL Foxcroft 

Extension Representative, Piscataquis County 
B. S., University of Maine, 1915 
JAMES EVERETT CHAPMAN 59 Main Street 

Extension Instructor in Soils 
B. A., Carleton College, 1910; M. S., University of Minnesota, 1915 
CATHARINE NORTON PLATTS University Inn 

Extension Representative in Home Economics 
B. S., Simmons College, 191 1 



EVERETT WILLARD DAVEE College Street 

Instructor in Wood and Iron Work 
CHARLES JENKINS CARTER Forest Avenue 

Instructor in Machine Tool Work 

MAYNIE ROSE CURTIS 13 Mill Street 

Assistant Biologist in the Agricultural Experiment Station 

A. B., University of Michigan, 1905; A. M., 1908; Ph. D., 1913 
WALTER ELWOOD FARNHAM Forest Avenue 

Instructor in Drawing 

WALTER EDMUND WILBUR 5 Pine Street 

Instructor in Mathematics 

B. S., University of Maine, 1908; M. S., 191 1 

ERNEST CONANT CHESWELL College Street 

Instructor in Electrical Engineering 

ROYDON LINDSAY HAMMOND 59 Main Street 

Seed Analyst and Photographer in the Agricultural Experiment Station 

EDWARD EUGENE SAWYER Old Town 

Assistant Chemist in the Agricultural Experiment Station 

B. S., University of Maine, 1912 



16 



Faculty 

ELMER ROBERT TOBEY 3 Pond Street 

Assistant Chemist in the Agricultural Experiment Station 

B. S., University of Maine, 191 1 

MICHAEL SHAPOVALOV 5 Pond Street 

Assistant Pathologist in the Agricultural Experiment Station 

B. A., University of Dorpat, 1903; M. S., University of Maine, 1913 

HERBERT SOLEY BAIN 53 Main Street 

Instructor in German 

A. B., Wesleyan University, 1912 

DOROTHEA BEACH Mill Street 

Instructor in Home Economics 

DAVID LEE CLARK North Main Street 

Instructor in English 

B. A., East Texas College, 1907; A. M., University of North Carolina, 
1909 

MARTIN ANDREW NORDGAARD 18 Mill Street 

Instructor in Mathematics 

A. B., St. Olaf College, 1903 ; M. A., University of Maine, 1914 
ELWOOD WHITNEY JENNISON 233 Cedar Street, Bangor 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering 

B. S., University of Maine, 1913 

JOHN RICE MINER 3 Pond Street 

Computer in the Agricultural Experiment Station 

A. B., University of Michigan, 1913 

JACOB ZINN 14 Bennoch Street 

Assistant Biologist in the Agricultural Experiment Station 
Agr. D., Hochschule fur Bodenkultus, 1914 
TIMOTHY JEREMIAH CONNORS, Jr. Forest Avenue 

Instructor in Pharmacy 
Pharni. D., Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 1912 
JAMES JOHN DONEGAN Mill Street 

Instructor in Civil Engineering 
Ph. B., Yale University, 1909 
RAYMOND FLOYD University Inn 

Instructor in German 

B. A., University of Maine, 1913 

NORMAN RICHARDS FRENCH 205 Hannibal Hamlin Hall 

Instructor in Physics 
B. A., University of Maine, 1913 



17 



University of Maine 

WILLIAM GORDON JAMES 75 North Main Street 

Instructor in Electrical Engineering 

B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913 

FRANCOIS JOSEPH KUENY University Inn 

Instructor in French 

B. es L., University of Paris, 1897; L. es L., Besangon, 1901 

ARTHUR WHITING LEIGHTON University Inn 

Instructor in Drawing 

ALEXANDER LURIE Forest Avenue 

Instructor in Horticulture 

B. S., Cornell University, 1913 

SIDNEY WINFIELD PATTERSON Hannibal Hamlin Hall 

Instructor in Biological and Agricultural Chemistry 

B. S., University of Maine, 1914 

GLEN BLAINE RAMSEY University Inn 

Instructor in Biology 

A. B., Indiana University, 1913 ; A. M., 1914 

NEIL CARPENTER SHERWOOD Campus 

Instructor in Animal Industry 

B. S., University of Maine, 1914 

HARRY GILBERT MITCHELL 57 Main Street 

Instructor in Chemistry 

B. S., Dartmouth College, 1910; A. M., Columbia University, 1914 

ROSCOE WOODS College Street 

Instructor in Mathematics 

A. B., Georgetown College, 1914 

HARRY CHAMBERLAIN BROWN 28 Bennoch Street 

Instructor in Physics 

B. S., Brown University, 1913 

WILBERT AMIE CLEMENS 206 Hannibal Hamlin Hall 

Instructor in Biology 
B. A., University of Toronto, 1912; M. A., 1913; Ph. D., Cornell 
University, 191 5 

ROLAND LEGARD DAVIS University Inn 

Instructor in Civil Engineering 
B. S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1915 
GUY LINTON DIFFENBAUGH College Street 

Instructor in English 
P. A ., Franklin and Marshall College, 1912; A. M., Harvard Univer- 
sity, 1915 

18 



Faculty 



CHESTER HAMLIN GOLDSMITH College Street 

Instructor in Chemistry 
B. S., University of Maine, 1915 
HELEN ANN KNIGHT University Inn 

Instructor in Home Economics 
Ph. B., University of Chicago, 1915 
FREDERICK WILLIAM LANE College Street 

Instructor in Chemistry 
S. B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1914 
ELMER LELAND PARTRIDGE University Inn 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering 
B. S., Case School of Applied Science, 1913 
ALTON WILLARD RICHARDSON Stillwater Avenue, Old Town 
Instructor in Animal Industry 
B. S., University of Maine, 1906 
ZOETH RANSOM RIDEOUT 1 Bennoch Street 

Instructor in English 

A. B., College of the Pacific, 1913; A. M., Columbia University, 1914 
WALTER HENRY ROGERS Campus 

Assistant Chemist in the Agricultural Experiment Station 

B. S., University of Maine, 1915 

MYER SEGAL 53 Main Street 

Instructor in German 
A. B., Bates College, 1909; A. M., Columbia University, 1910 
THOMAS WILLIAM SHEEHAN Pleasant Street 

Instructor in English 

A. B., Clark College, 1909; A. M., Pennsylvania State College, 1915 
J FRED THOMAS College Street 

Instructor in -Animal Industry 

B. S., Iowa State College, 1915 

STANLEY BEN SINK 7 Pine Street 

Instructor in Agronomy 

B. Sc, Ohio State University, 1915 

HILDA ESTELLE VAUGHAN College Street 

Instructor in English and in charge of Physical Education for Women 

A. B., Acadia University, 1908; also Smith College, 1909; A. M., 
1912 

ALBERT AMES WHITMORE University Inn 

Instructor in History 

B. S., University of Maine, 1906 

19 



University of Maine 

MARGARET JUNE KELLEY 52 Essex Street, Bangor 

Assistant in German 
B. A., University of Maine, 1912 
ARTHUR NELSON SMITH University Inn 

Assistant in Physical Training 
AVA HARRIET CHiADBOURNE College Street 

Assistant in Education 
B. A., University of Maine, 1915 
HENRY VIGOR CRANSTON 106 Hannibal Hamlin Hall 

Assistant in Public Speaking 
B. A., Pennsylvania State College, 1915 
WILLIS CARL LANE 408 Oak Hall 

Assistant in Biology 
B. Sc., Ohio State University, 1915 



MAY ELLA TAFT 14 Bennoch Street 

Catalog er in the Library 
B. A., Wellesley College, 1908; B. S., Simmons College, 1912 
GENEVA ALICE REED College Street 

Assistant in the Library 
B. A., University of Maine, 1910 
ANNE ELIZABETH H'ARWOOD 14 Bennoch Street 

Assistant in the Library 
B. S., Simmons College, 1913 

LECTURERS 

LUCILIUS ALONZO EMERY Ellsworth 

Lecturer on Roman and Probate Law 

A. B., Bowdoin College, 1861 ; A. M., 1864; LL. D., 1898 

LOUIS CARVER SOUTHARD Boston 

Lecturer on Medico-Legal Relations 

B. S., University of Maine, 1875; M. S., 1892; LL. D., 1904 
EDWARD HARWARD BLAKE 107 Court Street, Bangor 

Lecturer on Admiralty 
LL. B., Albany Law School, 1878; LL. D., University of Maine, 1910 
ISAAC WATSON DYER Portland 

Lecturer on Federal Jurisdiction and Procedure, and on Private 
Corporations 
A. B., Bowdoin College, 1878 
JOHN ROGERS MASON 48 Madison Street, Bangor 

Lecturer in Bankruptcy Law 
A. B., Harvard University, 1869; A. M., LL. B., 1872 

20 



Faculty 

WILLIAM BRIDGHAM PEIRCE 25 Parkview Avenue, Bangor 

Resident Lecturer on Maine Practice 
B. M. E., University of Maine, 1890 
HENRY BURT MONTAGUE Southbridge, Mass. 

Lecturer on Practice and History of Lazv 
LL. B., Cornell University, 1895; LL. M., University of Maine, 1910 
LAWRENCE VIVIAN JONES 267 Pine Street, Bangor 

Lecturer on Forestry Law 
LL. B., University of Maine, 1910 

COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

Admission — The Deans and President 

Athletics — Wingard, F. S. Clark, Gannett, L. S. Merrill, Sprague, 

Worster 
Attendance — C. B. Brown, Corbett, Hamlin, Lekberg, Simpson 
Auditing — L. H. Merrill, Brooks, Burghart, Eaton, Grover, G. A. 

Thompson 
Chapel — Barrows, Hitchings, Matthews, Stephenson, Woodman 
Employment — Gannett, Durgin, Simmons, Wilbur 

Fitting Schools — Chase, Easley, Hart, L. S. Merrill, Pearce, Richard- 
son, Stephens, Weston 
Graduate Study — Chase, Colvin, Craig, McKee, L. H. Merrill, Morse, 

Pearl, Segall, Walz, Willard, Woodman 
Health — Boardman, Ashley, Boring, Freeman, Jarrett, Lyons, Russell 
Honors — Chrysler, Briscoe, B. S Brown, Kaulfuss, Smith, Walz 
Library — R. K. Jones, Gray, Russell, Sweetser, G. W. Thompson, Wil- 
lard 
Rules — Stephens, Conser, Drummond, Holmes, Huddilston, Simmons 
Schedule— Weston, Gannett, Hamlin, Reed, the Deans 
Social Affairs — Huddilston, Briscoe, Colvin, Farnham, Freeman, Win- 
gard 
Student Activities — (Non-Athletic) — McKee, Chairman 

Sub-committees 
Dramatics — Daggett, C. B. Brown, Raggio 
Musical — G. W. Thompson, Drummond, Raggio 
Speaking and Debating — Daggett, Stephens, G. A. Thompson 
Campus — Gray, Kaulfuss, McAnney 
Miscellaneous — McKee, Childs, F. S. Clark 
Student Affairs — The Deans and President 
University Publications— Stevens, R. K. Jones, McAnney 

21 



University of Maine 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



HISTORY 



The University of Maine is a part of the public educational system 
of the State. It was established as a result of the Morrill Act 
approved by President Lincoln July 2, 1862. The State of Maine ac- 
cepted the conditions of this act in 1863. In 1865 the State created 
a corporation to administer the affairs of the college. The original 
name of the institution was the State College of Agriculture and the 
Mechanic Arts. The name was changed to the University of Maine 
in 1897. 

The first Board of Trustees was composed of 16 members, each 
county delegation in the Legislature selecting one member. Various 
changes have occurred in the appointment of Board members. At the 
present time seven members of the Board are appointed by the Gov- 
ernor of the State, with the advice and consent of the Council, for a 
term of seven years. One member is appointed for three years by the 
Governor upon the nomination of the Alumni Association. 

The institution opened September 21, 1868, with a class of 12 mem- 
bers and a faculty of two teachers. By 1871 four curricula had been 
arranged, — Agriculture, Civil Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and 
Elective. By gradual growth these curricula developed into the Col- 
lege of Agriculture, the College of Technology, and the College of 
Arts and Sciences. 

The Maine Agricultural Experiment Station was established as a 
division of the University by act of the Legislature of 1887, as a 
result of the passage by Congress of the Hatch Act. It succeeded the 
Maine Fertilizer Control and Agricultural Experiment Station which 
had been established in 1885. 



22 



Buildings 

The College of Law was opened in 1898. It is an integral part of 
the institution but occupies quarters at the corner of Union and Second 
streets in Bangor. 

Graduate instruction has been given by various departments for many 
years. The first Master's degree was conferred in 1881. There is no 
provision for graduate work in advance of that required for the Mas- 
ter's degrees. 

Summer schools were held in cooperation with the State Department 
of Education in 1895, 1896, and 1897. These were of three weeks each 
and they attracted chiefly teachers in elementary schools. Beginning 
with 1902, a Summer Term has been held annually, first of five weeks 
but now of six. It is designed for teachers in secondary schools and 
for college students who desire to take advantage of its opportunities, 
and it also gives some courses for those who seek an opportunity to 
make up entrance credits. The departments usually offering courses 
are Chemistry, Economics and Sociology, Education, English, French, 
German, History, Latin, Mathematics and Astronomy, Physics, and 
Spanish and Italian. 

The University is coeducational, women having been admitted since 
1872, in compliance with special legal enactment. 

LOCATION 

The University is in the town of Orono, nine miles from Bangor. 
The campus, which is large and attractive, borders on the Stillwater 
River, a branch of the Penobscot. 

Orono is reached by the Maine Central railroad, and by the cars of 
the Bangor Railway and Electric Company. The town has a population 
of about 3,500. It has good schools and churches. All the churches 
welcome student attendance. 

BUILDINGS AND THEIR EQUIPMENT 

Balentine Hall. — The Legislature of 1913 made an appropriation 
for the erection of one wing of a women's dormitory. This was com- 
pleted September 1, 1914. The Legislature of 1915 made an appropria- 
tion for completing the building. The name was given in honor of 
Elizabeth Abbott Balentine, Secretary and Registrar of the University 
from 1895 to 1913. It contains accommodations for 52 women, and 
when completed will accommodate no women. 

23 



University of Maine 

Hannibal Hamlin Hall. — This is a men's dormitory completed in 
1911. It contains four stories and a concrete basement. It was named 
for the Honorable Hannibal Hamlin, of Hampden and Bangor, the 
first president of the Board of Trustees. It will accommodate 156 
students. 

Mount Vernon House. — This is a wooden building, remodeled in 
1898, and is a dormitory for women. It is a three story building and 
will accommodate 36 students. 

North Hall.' — This building is situated near the northern boundary 
of the campus. It is a three story wooden building and accommodates 
22 women students. 

Oak Hall. — This building was named for the Honorable Lyndon 
Oak, of Garland, a long time member and President of the Board of 
Trustees. It is a four story building erected in 1871 and has 48 rooms 
for students. 

University Inn. — This is a wooden building, located in the village 
of Orono, which the university has leased for a term of years. It is 
occupied chiefly by instructors and has accommodations for fifty 
persons. 



Alumni Hall. — This building was erected in 1900 and was given its 
name because funds required for its erection were subscribed by the 
Alumni of the University. It contains the gymnasium, chapel, and ad- 
ministrative offices. 

Aubert Hall. — This is a four story building including a high base- 
ment. It was named in honor of the late Alfred Bellany Aubert, pro- 
fessor of Chemistry from 1874 to 1910. It is used by the departments 
of Chemistry and Physics. 

Coburn Hall. — This building contains the department of Biology 
and the Museum and has recitation rooms for the departments of 
History and Economics and Sociology. It was named for ex-Governor 
Abner Coburn, of Skowhegan, a former president of the Board of 
Trustees. 

Estabrooke Hall. — This building is used for the departments of 
English and Public Speaking, and was named for the late Horace M. 
Estabrooke, Professor of English from 1891 to 1908. It contains four 
recitation rooms, rooms for consultation purposes, and offices for the 
members of the departments. 



24 



Buildings 

Fernald Hall. — This is the oldest building on the campus and was 
erected for the department of Chemistry. It now contains the depart- 
ments of French, Spanish and Italian, Education, Mathematics, and 
the University Store. It was named in honor of ex-President Merritt 
C. Fernald. 

Holmes Hall. — This building contains the offices and laboratories of 
the Maine Agricultural Experiment Station. It is a two story build- 
ing in addition to a basement. It was named for Dr. Ezekiel Holmes, 
of Winthrop. 

Library Building. — The Library Building is of stone, two stories 
above a basement, and surmounted by a dome. For its erection and 
furnishing, Mr. Andrew Carnegie gave $55,000, and the Hallowell 
Granite Works furnished the granite at a price that was equivalent 
to a gift of several thousand dollars. The stacks, which are in the 
rear of the main building, contain shelf room for 60,000 volumes. 

Lord Hall. — This building was erected for the departments of Elec- 
trical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. It is two stories in 
height and contains recitation rooms, laboratories, shops, drawing 
rooms, and offices for the members of these departments. It was 
named for the Honorable Henry Lord, of Bangor, a former President 
of the Board of Trustees. 

Stewart Hall. — This building is situated in Bangor and contains 
offices and recitation rooms of the College of Law. It is three stories 
in height and was named for Honorable D. D. Stewart* of St. Albans, 
Maine, who has been a generous benefactor of this college. 

Wingate Hall. — This building contains three stories and a basement. 
It. is used by the departments of Civil Engineering and Mechanics and 
Drawing, and includes recitation rooms and offices for the departments 
of Latin and Philosophy. 

Winslow Hall. — This is a four story building including the base- 
ment. It contains offices, laboratories, and recitation rooms for the 
various departments of the College of Agriculture. It was named in 
honor of Honorable Edward B. Winslow, of Portland, a former presi- 
dent of the Board of Trustees. In the rear of this building is located 
the stock judging pavilion, which is an octagonal structure, having a 
seating capacity of 600. 



Dairy Building. — This building contains various rooms appropriate 
for the department of Dairy Husbandry. It is supplied with the neces- 

25 



University of Maine 

sary appliances for teaching methods of handling milk, cream, butter, 
and cheese. 

Farm Buildings. — These comprise two large barns containing the 
usual equipment, two tool houses, and a piggery. The farm of the 
University is composed of parcels of land aggregating 473 acres, of 
which 120 acres are under cultivation. 

Horticultural Building. — This includes a set of greenhouses east 
of Holmes Hall and furnishes opportunity for demonstration of the 
practical culture of flowers and vegetables under glass. 

Infirmary. — This building is used in caring for cases of infectious 
diseases that may appear among the students. It is located in the rear 
of Hannibal Hamlin Hall. 

Observatory. — The astronomical observatory stands on a slight ele- 
vation at the east of Alumni Hall. It contains, equipment for work 
in descriptive and practical astronomy. 

Poultry Plant. — The part of the plant that belongs to the College 
of Agriculture consists o'f a two and one half story building to which 
are attached brooder houses. The plant which belongs to the Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station contains an incubator house with tenement 
above, two poultry houses, a two story house, a building containing a 
hospital for hens, and rooms for digestion experiments. 



Athletic Field. — Alumni Field, so called because funds required 
tor its construction were contributed by the Alumni Association, is 
located at the northern end of the campus. It contains a quarter-mile 
cinder track, with a 220-yard straightaway, and is graded and laid out 
for football, baseball, and track and field athletics. It contains a grand- 
stand with a seating capacity of 2,100. There is also an out-door 
board running track 390 feet long by 12 feet wide. 

Central Heating Plant. — The Central Heating Plant is located on 
low ground so that the buildings drain by gravity to the plant. It 
contains four 150 h. p. boilers, two Worthington duplex return pumps, 
and scales for weighing coal. 

Fraternity Houses. — The local chapters of Beta Theta Pi, Delta 
Tau Delta, Kappa Sigma, Phi Gamma Delta, Phi Kappa Sigma, Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon, Theta Chi, and the Phi Eta Kappa society have built 
house's on the campus; the local chapter of Sigma Nu is building a 
house on the campus ; the local chapter of Lambda Chi Alpha owns a 

26 



Libraries 

house adjoining the campus on College Street, and the local chapters 
of Alpha Tau Omega and Sigma Chi own houses on North Main 
Street. These houses accommodate from 25 to 35 students each. 

Power House. — This building is located north of Alumni Hall and 
contains two boilers, three engines, and two dynamos with operating 
switchboard. 

Other Buildings. — In addition to the buildings already described, 
there are several others devoted to various purposes. Among these 
are the President's house and five residences occupied by members of 
the faculty. 

THE LIBRARIES 

The university libraries contain (June 30, 1915) 56,45! volumes, of 
which 47,358 are in the general library, 4,271 in the Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station, and 4,822 in the law library. All of the Station 
library books are placed on the shelves of the general library except 
those required for constant reference by members of the Station staff. 
The law library is at the College of Law, Bangor. No other depart- 
mental libraries are maintained, but books required by departments are 
taken by them from the general library for temporary use. 

The general library provides a very good working collection of books. 
The greater part have been secured by purchase, and more than haif 
have been added within the last ten years. Most of the books bought 
are selected by heads of departments to meet the needs of students and 
the teaching staff. Many valuable sets of general, scientific, and tech- 
nical periodicals are included in the collection. The Station library is 
of much value, including many sets of scientific journals. The law 
library is a carefully (selected and useful collection, made since the 
Bangor fire of 191 1, when the former library was completely destroyed. 
More than five hundred magazines and other serial publications are 
received regularly by the libraries. 

The valuable horticultural library of Professor Welton M. Munson, a 
member of the university faculty from 1890 until 1907, was bequeathed 
by him to the University. The private mathematical library of President 
R. J. Aley, and a considerable portion of the library of the late Pro- 
fessor H. M. Estabrooke, the latter particularly strong in English 
literature and languages, are deposited in the general library where they 
are available for use. 



27 



University of Maine 

The libraries are classified by the Dewey decimal system, modified 
for certain classes. There is a card catalog, author, subject, and title. 
No restrictions are placed upon admission to the stacks. 

The general library is open daily, during the academic year, from 
8.00 A. M. to 5.30 P. M., and from 7.00 to 9.30 P. M., except Sundays 
and holidays. It is open Sunday afternoons from 2.30 to 5.30 and on 
holidays from 8.00 A. M. to 12.00 M. During the Summer Term it is 
open daily from 8.00 A. M. to 5.30 P. M., except Saturday afternoons 
and Sundays, and during vacations it is open daily, except Sundays and 
holidays, for somewhat shorter hours. 

Students may borrow three volumes at a time, to be retained three 
weeks; if more are desired, application should be made to the Librarian. 
Officers of the University may borrow any reasonable number of vol- 
umes, without time limit, except that all books must be returned to the 
library nine days before Commencement. Other responsible persons 
may obtain the privileges of the library upon application to the Librarian. 

It is the desire of the university authorities to make the general 
library as useful as possible to all citizens of the State, so that books are 
loaned to individuals and organizations when this may be done without 
interfering with the needs of faculty and students, the borrower paying 
transportation charges in both directions. 

MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY 

MINTIN ASBURY CHRYSLER 

Curator of the Botanical and Zoological Collections 

LUCIUS HERBERT MERRILL 

Curator of the Geological Collections 

The museum occupies the wing of Coburn Hall and an adjoining 
room in the main part of the building. 

Geological Collections. — These collections, occupying the upper floor 
of the wing of Coburn Hall, are accessible daily during the college year, 
except on Saturdays and Sundays. They include the more important 
fragmental, crystalline, and volcanic rocks; a collection of building 
stones; a series designed to illustrate the rocks of the State; a general 
collection of more common minerals; a collection of economic minerals 
furnished by the United States National Museum; an educational series 
of rocks furnished by the United States Geological Survey; and a small 
collection of planl and animal fossils. 

28 



Museum 

The part of the museum illustrating the mineral resources of the 
State may be made of great value, both from the scientific and economic 
standpoint. Students and others residing in the State are urged to con- 
tribute specimens, from their home localities. 

Zoological Collections. — These collections occupy the lower floor of 
the wing of Coburn Hall. Some of the alcoholic and formalin material 
is placed in wall cases in the biological laboratories. The collections 
consist of a number of the larger mammals of the State; a small set 
of exotic mammals; a more complete working collection of native birds, 
birds' nests, and eggs; an illustrative collection of the other groups of 
vertebrates; a rather large collection of the shells of native and exotic 
molluscs ; and illustrative collections of the other groups, dry, alcoholic, 
and prepared as microscopic objects. 

Botanical Collections. — These collections are situated in rooms on 
the second and third floors of Coburn Hall. The herbarium includes 
several collections of considerable value, the most important of which 
is the one presented to the university by Mr. Jonathan G. Clark, of 
Bangor, and made by the late Rev. Joseph Blake. It contains more 
than 7,000 species of both flowering and flowerless plants, and represents 
more especially the flora of Maine and other New England states, but 
includes many forms from the western United States, Mexico, and the 
West Indies, and a number from many of the European and Asiatic 
countries, and from Africa and Australia. The late Professor Harvey 
left to the herbarium the general collections accumulated during his 
connection with the University, and his special collection of the weeds 
and forage plants of Maine, comprising 300 species. Other important 
collections are Collins's Algae of the Maine coast, Halsted's Lichens of 
New England, Halsted's Weeds, Ellis and Everhart's North American 
Fungi, Cook's Illustrative Fungi, Underwood's Hepaticae, Cummings and 
Seymour's North American Lichens., and a collection of economic seeds 
prepared by the United States Department of Agriculture. 

Collections other than the herbarium include exhibits illustrating the 
manufacture of paper and of cocoa, the wood and bark features of the 
timber trees of Maine, conifers mounted in jars, plants used in phar- 
macy, commercial fibres, and artificial silk. A valuable collection of 
fossil plants was presented' by the late Professor Harvey. 



29 



University of Maine 

ART COLLECTION 

The collection consists of photographs, prints, engravings, polychrome 
reproductions, and plaster casts. Many of the large reproductions are 
framed and the entire collection has found a fitting home in the Library 
Building, the gallery of which is well adapted to the exhibition of many 
of the plaster-cast reliefs and the larger framed works. The collection 
is distributed on the first and second floors, in the large lecture room, 
and in a seminar room. In the latter is a specially constructed cabinet 
for the mounted photographs. 

The entire collection numbers upwards of 4,000 reproductions of vari- 
ous sorts covering the fields of Classical and Renaissance architecture, 
sculpture, and painting. The illustrations for the Greek, Florentine, and 
Venetian schools are particularly representative. For much of the most 
important work the photographs are supplemented by lantern slides. 

The university possesses many of the famous polychrome prints 
published by the Arundel Society. These and many other colored 
reproductions covering nearly all the great masters of Italian painting 
hnve been framed ; and in the case of the Madonna della sedia and the 
Sistine Madonna the reproductions were imported in the frames which 
are stucco copies of the originals in Dresden and Florence. 

The large lecture room in the Library Building contains examples of 
the work of the chief Florentine and Umbrian masters of the 14th and 
15th centuries, arranged on the walls in historical sequences. The gal- 
lery of the second floor is devoted to masters of the High Renaissance. 

For the study of Greek and Roman antiquity the departments of 
Greek and Latin have a large collection of photographs and lantern 
slides. 

ORGANIZATIONS 

Agricultural Club.— This organization is composed of students taking 
agricultural courses. Meetings are held throughout the college year, at 
which important agricultural topics are discussed by members of the 
club, and also by prominent speakers from this and other states. 

American Chemical Society. — The Maine Section of the American 
Chemical Society has its headquarters at Orono. Some students in the 
department of Chemistry are members, and all are welcome to its meet- 
ing. 



30 



Organizations 

American Institute of Electrical Engineering. — This is an organ- 
ization for the promotion of the student's interest in electrical engi- 
neering work, and to keep him in touch with the latest developments in 
this branch of engineering activity. Membership in the branch is ex- 
tended to members of the Electrical Engineering faculty, students pur- 
suing the Electrical Engineering curriculum, and to members and asso- 
ciate members of the Institute. 

American Society of Mechanical Engineers. — A regularly organized 
branch of this society holds regular meetings for the presentation and 
discussion of engineering papers by members and by visiting engineers. 

University of Maine Society of Civil Engineering. — This society 
is composed of the students who are enrolled in the curriculum in Civil 
Engineering. The object of the society is to investigate by reading 
and discussion the various engineering topics of the day. Monthly lec- 
tures are given under the direction of the society by members of the 
faculties of this and other institutions and by practicing engineers. 

The affairs of the society are controlled by the students under the 
advice of the department. 

Cercle Francais. — The object of the Cercle Francais of the Univer- 
sity of Maine is to cultivate the spoken French language and arouse and 
stimulate an interest in the intellectual life of France among the stu- 
dents of the University. The work is carried on in French. Papers are 
read and discussed and addresses delivered by the members. Plays are 
studied with a view toward production in French. The Cercle Francais 
nieets once in two weeks. 

Deutscher Verein. — This society, organized in 1902, is composed of 
teachers and students. Its purpose is to stimulate interest in the various 
phases of German life and literature and afford practice in speaking 
German. The number of members is limited. Meetings are held every 
three weeks during the academic year. 

Forestry Club. — All students majoring in the curriculum in Forestry 
are eligible for membership in the Forestry Club. The purpose of the 
club is to give an opportunity for presenting informal discussions and 
technical papers on forestry subjects, and to promote cooperation and 
general good fellowship among the forestry students. The meetings are 
held monthly. 

Maine Masque. — This is a dramatic club which aims to make a prac- 
tical study of the acted drama, and to present each year before the public 
one or more representative plays. Membership is determined by com- 
petitive trials to which all men undergraduates are eligible. 

31 



University of Maine 

Speakers' Club. — A local honorary society, open to all students who 
acquire a sufficiently high standing in public debate and oratory. The 
object of the club is to promote interest in public speaking at the Uni- 
versity. It is in active cooperation with the department of Public Speak- 
ing, and superintends some of the minor activities in oratory and debate. 

Christian Association. — The Christian Association, composed of men 
students, has for it's object the promotion of Christian fellowship and 
aggressive Christian work. Religious services are held in the Chapel 
every Sunday and classes for the study of the Bible are conducted 
during the week. 

Young Women's Christian Association. — This is an organization 
for religious work composed of women students. 



Alpha Chi Sigma. — Alpha Chi Sigma is a professional fraternity 
with chapters in various American colleges and universities.. The mem- 
bers are elected from those whose major work is in the department of 
Chemistry. 

Alpha Zeta. — The Maine chapter of Alpha Zeta, the national agri- 
cultural fraternity, was organized at the University in 1905. Chapters 
exist in fourteen other universities. Membership is honorary and is 
restricted to students attaining high class standing or to graduates who 
have shown marked ability along the lines of agricultural study and 
research. 

Phi Kappa Phi. — The Phi Kappa Phi is an honorary society. Early 
in the fall semester of the senior year the seven members of the class 
having the highest standing are elected members, and during the spring 
semester the ten next highest may be elected, two of whom are from 
the College of Law. 

Sigma Delta Chi. — This is an honorary fraternity open to sopho- 
mores, juniors, and seniors who have shown unusual ability in the 
various courses in journalism, and who propose to enter upon journal- 
ism as a profession. 

Tau Beta Pi. — Tau Beta Pi is an honor fraternity for engineers and 
has chapters in leading universities and technical schools.. Elections to 
the fraternity take place twice a year, and are made from those j unions 
and seniors in engineering who have shown high mental and moral quali- 
fications. 



32 



University Publications 

UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

Annual Report. — The report includes an account of the general af- 
fairs and interests of the University for the year. 

University of Maine Studies. — These are occasional publications 
containing reports of investigations or researches made by university 
officers or alumni. 

Maine Bulletin. — This is a publication issued monthly during ihe 
academic year, to give information to the alumni and the general public. 
Among recent issues are bulletins relating to the Classical Curriculum, 
the College of Agriculture, the Curriculum in Pharmacy, the College 
of Law, the College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Technology, 
the Curriculum in Forestry, the Courses in Education, the Summer 
Term, and an Alumni Directory. 

Annual Report of the Agricultural Experiment Station and the 
Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletins. — These give complete 
results of the work of investigation of the station. The Bulletins and 
Official Inspections are sent free on request to any resident of Maine. 

Official Inspections. — These are published by the Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station, and contain the result of the work of inspection of 
agricultural seeds, commercial feeding stuffs, commercial fertilizers, 
drugs, foods, fungicides, and insecticides. 

Maine Campus. — This is a journal published weekly during the 
academic year by an association of the students. 

Prism. — The Prism is an illustrated annual, published by the junior 
class. 

Practical Husbandry. — This is a quarterly magazine published under 
the direction of the Agricultural Club. It is devoted to practical and 
technical agriculture. 

Maine Law Review. — This is a magazine published under the direc- 
tion of the students of the College of Law. It is devoted to a discussion 
of law cases and other current legal problems. 

PUBLIC WORSHIP 

Short exercises, are held in the chapel every day except Saturday 
and Sunday. All undergraduate students are required to be present. 
Students receive a cordial welcome at all services in the churches of 
Orono. Voluntary religious services are held each week under the 
direction of the Christian Association and the Young Women's Christian 
Association. 

33 



University of Maine 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

It is assumed that all students entering the university are willing to 
subscribe to the following: A student is expected to show both within 
and without the university respect for order, morality, and the rights of 
others, and such sense of personal honor as is demanded of good citi- 
zens and gentlemen. 

Special information in regard to rules and regulations may be ob- 
tained from the Registrar. 

The quota of regular studies for each student varies from a 'minimum 
of fourteen hours to a maximum of eighteen hours in the College of 
Arts and Sciences, and from a minimum of seventeen hours to a maxi- 
mum of twenty-two hours in the College of Agriculture and the College 
ot Technology. In the application of this rule, two to three hours oi 
laboratory work count as one hour. 

Each student is expected to be present at every college exercise for 
which he is registered, including each chapel exercise. 

SCHOLARSHIP HONORS 

Scholarship honors are awarded to students who attain an average 
grade of B, or above, thruout their course. The names of students 
winning these honors are printed on the Commencement program and 
in the catalog. 

DEGREES 

Bachelors' Degrees 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts (B. A.), with specification of the 
major subject, is conferred upon all students who complete a curriculum 
in the College of Arts and Sciences. These students are required to 
fulfil the proper entrance conditions and to obtain at least six credits 
in the department in which their major work lies. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science (B. S.) 'in the curriculum pursued 
is conferred upon students who complete the prescribed work of four 
years in the Colleges of Agriculture or Technology. 

The degree of Bachelor of Pedagogy (B. Pd.) is conferred upon 
students in the College of Arts and Sciences who have completed a 
course in an approved high school, a course in a normal school, and 
two years under prescribed conditions at the university. 

34 



Degrees 

The degree of Bachelor of Laws (LL. B.) is conferred upon students 
who complete the prescribed work in the College of Law. 

The degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist (Ph. C.) is conferred upon 
students who complete the two-year Pharmacy curriculum. 

Beginning with the entering class of 1914, the degree of Graduate in 
Pharmacy (Ph. G.) will be conferred upon students completing the pre- 
scribed two years curriculum. The entrance requirements for this cur- 
riculum will be raised gradually from two years of high school work 
now required to a complete high school course, by 1919. As soon as 
proper courses, can be provided, a three years curriculum in Pharmacy 
will be established, leading to the degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist 
(Ph. C.) requiring for entrance the completion of a four years high 
school course. 

A minimum residence of one year is required for the attainment of 
any Bachelor's degree. 

Advanced Degrees 

Graduate (students, whether candidates for a degree or not, are re- 
quired to register at the office of the university at the beginning of each 
semester. Those entering the university after that date must obtain 
the consent of the committee on graduate study before they can count 
a full year's work. 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Arts, Master of Science, or 
Master of Laws must have received the corresponding bachelor's degree 
from this institution, or from one granting a fully equivalent degree. 

At least one year must elapse between the conferring of the bachelor's 
and the master's degree. 

No work done before the recommending of the bachelor's degree 
shall be counted toward the master's degree. 

The candidate shall devote at least one year to graduate resident 
study and shall complete work amounting to fifteen hours per week 
thruout a college year. 

The courses of study for each candidate must be approved by the 
committee on graduate study not later than the fourth week of the 
semester. 

A registration fee of $5 is charged, and an additional fee of $15 for 
examinations and diploma is payable upon the completion of the work. 
One registration fee only is required of graduate students. 

The curriculum shall include work in one major department or sub- 
ject in which the candidate has already pursued undergraduate study 

35 



University of Maine 

for at least two years, and work in not more than two minor subjects 
which bears a distinct relation to the general plan or purpose of the 
major subject. 

At least three fifths of the work must be done in the major subject. 
In 'special cases all the work may be done in one department. 

All of the work must be of advanced character and must be tested by 
examinations, which the candidate shall pass with distinction. 

The candidate shall prepare as a part of his curriculum a satisfactory 
thesis on some topic connected with the major subject. These must be 
deposited with the Dean of the University not later than 12 m v Monday, 
of the week preceding Commencement. 

At the end of the course of study for the master's degree, the candi- 
date will be required to pass an oral examination covering his work, 
including the thesis work. This examination shall be open to all voting 
members of the faculty of the university. The time for such examina- 
tions will be arranged by the Dean of the University to accord, so far 
as possible, with the convenience of the candidate and the major 
instructor, between the dates of May 15 and June 1 ; but no student 
will be admitted to an oral examination until his thesis has been ac- 
cepted. On May 15, the Dean of the University will notify the heads 
of all departments of the university of the dates set for the public 
oral examination's of all candidates of the year. While the examination 
will in each case, as a matter of course, be conducted chiefly by the 
members of the department in which the work has been done, any 
member of the faculty present at the examination has the privilege of 
questioning the candidate. The committee on graduate study will be 
represented at each examination.. 

The professional degrees of Chemical Engineer (Ch. E.), Civil Engi- 
neer (C. E.), Electrical Engineer (E. E.), and Mechanical Engineering 
(M. E.) may be conferred upon graduates in the curricula in Chemistry 
or Chemical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Mechanical Engi- 
neering respectively, upon the presentation of satisfactory theses., after 
at least three years of professional work subsequent to graduation. 
During at least two of the years after graduation the candidate must 
have occupied a position of responsibility. A fee of $5.00 is required 
at the time of registration, A fee of $10.00 is required payable upon 
presentation of the thesis, which must be submitted not later than 
Monday of the week preceding Commencement. Candidates are ex- 
pected to be present in person to receive their degrees. 



3* 



Expenses 

THESES 

Theses shall be printed, or typewritten in black record, unless the 
subject matter prevents, and the paper used shall be a standard thesis 
paper, 8 x 10 1-2 inches, which may be procured at the University Store. 
Care should be taken to have a margin of one indh on the inner edge, 
at least one-half on the outer edge, one and one-half inches at the top, 
.and one inch at the bottom of the page. 

If drawings accompany the thesis, they may be bound in with the 
rest of the pages or placed in a pocket on the inside of the back cover; 
or if too many for this, they may be bound separately according to per- 
sonal instructions of the head of the department. 

An outline of all undergraduate theses must be passed to the major 
instructor before May 1. 

Complete instructions may be found in a pamphlet entitled "Degrees 
and Theses." 

STUDENT EXPENSES 

The estimates are prepared upon the basis of students living in 
university halls. 



Estimate of Annual Expenses for Men 

Students from within Students from without 

the State the State 

Registration $10 00 $10 00 

Incidentals 20 00 20 00 

Tuition 30 00 to $40 00 100 00 

Laboratory fees 10 00 to 25 00 10 00 to $25 00 

Text-books 10 00 to 30 00 jo 00 to 30 00 

Board 36 weeks @ $3.50 126 00 126 00 

Room in a dormitory . . 36 00 to 45. 00 36 00 to 45 00 



$242 00 to $286 00 $312 00 to $356 00 

Estimate of Annual Expenses for Women 

The expenses for women are the same as for men, except that the 
annual charge for board and room is uniformly $170.00. 



V 



University of Maine 

Exceptions 

By legislative enactment, students in agricultural and home economics 
curricula are exempted from the payment of tuition charges. This 
applies only to students from within the State. For such students the 
above estimates should be reduced by an amount equal to the tuition 
charge. 

Details of Laboratory Fees 

The laboratory charges indicated above are made to cover cost of 
material used by the students. These charges vary with the subject and 
length of the course. They are as follows : Agronomy, per course 
$;.oo to $1.50; Animal Industry, per course, $1.00 to $4.00; Bacteriology, 
per course, $3.00; Biological Chemistry, per course, $3.00 to $4.00; Biol- 
ogy, per course, $2.00 to $3.00 ; Chemistry, per course, $2.00 to $5.00 ; Civil 
Engineering, per course, $2.00 to $5.00; Electrical Engineering, per 
course, $2.50; Home Economics from $1.00 to $12.00 per semester; 
Horticulture, per course, $1.00 to $2.00; Mechanical Engineering, per 
course, $2.00; Mineralogy, per course, $2.00; Pharmacy, per semester, 
about $5.00; Physics, per course, $2.50 to $3.50; Shop Work, per course, 
$4.00 to $5.00. 

Special Charges 

A fee of $2.00 is charged a student for each special examination. 
Students registering after the prescribed day of registration for the 
fall or spring semester shall pay an additional fee of two dollars. 

Dormitory Rooms 

The rooms in the Mt. Vernon House, Balentine Hall, Oak Hall, North 
Hall, and the middle section of Hannibal Hamlin Hall accommodate 
two students each. All other rooms accommodate four students each. 

Dormitory charges include steam heat and electric lights. The rooms 
in the dormitories for men are furnished with beds, mattresses, chif- 
foniers, desks, and chairs. Each resident in a dormitory has bed linen 
and three towels laundered each week without extra charge. 

Women students not living at home are required to live in one of 
the women's dormitories. In exceptional cases women students are al- 
lowed to live at some boarding house approved by the President. To 

38 



Expenses 

secure the reservation of a room in a university dormitory, application, 
accompanied by a deposit of $5.00, should be made on or before Septem- 
ber 1. 

Students in the College of Law may obtain board and room in Ban- 
gor at prices ranging from $5.00 to $7.00 per week. 

Deposits to Cover Expenses (for each semester) 

Each student on or before registration day is required to make a 
deposit in accordance with the following table : 

Students from within Students from without 
the State the State 

Students in Agriculture $100 00 $150 00 

Students in Forestry 100 00 15000 

Students in Home Economics... 100 00 15000 

Students in Arts and Sciences.. 1150° 15000 

Students in Technology 115 00 150 00 

Students in Law 35 00 65 00 

For a student not living in a university dormitory the above deposits 
are reduced by $80.00, except in the College of Law. 

Communications 

Communications with reference to financial affairs of students should 
be addressed to the Treasurer of the University of Maine. 

Blanket Tax 

Students generally contribute $11.00 annually to the support of ath- 
letics and the Maine Campus. This is not a university requirement, but 
is wholly voluntary. 

KITTRIDGE LOAN FUND 

This fund, amounting to nearly one thousand dollars, was established 
by Nehemiah Rittridge, of Bangor. It is in the control of the Presi- 
dent and the Treasurer of the University, by whom it is loaned to needy 
students in the three upper classes. In the deed of gift it was prescribed 
that no security but personal notes bearing interest at the prevailing rate 
should be required. Loans are made on the conditions that the interest 
be paid promptly, and that the principal be returned from the first earn- 
ings after graduation. Individual loans are limited to $50.00. 

39 



University of Maine 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES 

The Kidder Scholarship, thirty dollars, was endowed by Frank E. 
Kidder, Ph. D., Denver, Colorado, a graduate of the university of the 
class of 1879, and is awarded to a member of the junior class to be 
selected by the President and the faculty. 

New York Alumni Association Scholarship, thifty dollars, is 
awarded upon conditions to be determined by the Board of Trustees. 
It has for some years been awarded to the student who excelled in 
debate. 

Pittsburg Alumni Association Scholarship, tuition for one year, 
is awarded to a member of the junior class in the College of Technology, 
to be selected by the President and the professors in that college. 

Western Alumni Association Scholarship, tuition for the sopho- 
more year, is awarded a student pursuing a regular curriculum whose 
deportment is satisfactory and who makes good progress in his studies 
during his freshman year. 

The Elizabeth Abbott Balentine Scholarship was endowed by the 
Gamma chapter of Alpha Omicron Pi for a woman member of the 
sophomore class to be determined by the President and the faculty. 
This scholarship will be at least thirty dollars. Both scholarship and 
the individual need are to be considered in the award. 



Junior Exhibition Prizes of fifteen dollars each are awarded to 
the members of the junior class who deliver the best orations at the 
junior exhibition. One prize is awarded to the man receiving the 
first rank in competition with the men of the junior class, and one 
prize awarded to the woman receiving first rank in competition with 
the women of the junior class. In the award of these prizes regard 
h given to thought, style, and delivery. Copies of these orations 
must be deposited with the Registrar before February 1. 

Sophomore Essay Prizes, two of fifteen dollars each, one for men 
and one for women, are awarded to members of the sophomore class 
for excellence in composition. These essays must be presented by 
May 1. 

Clarence P. King Prize, twenty-five dollars, 'the gift of Mr. Clarence 
P. King, of Washington, D. C, is awarded to that member of the 
senior and junior classes who delivers the best original oration. 



40 



Scholarship and prizes 

Walter Balentine Prize, fifteen dollars, the gift of Whitman H. 
Jordan, Sc. D., LL. D., Geneva, N. Y., a graduate of the university of 
the class of 1875, is awarded to that member of the junior class who 
excels in biological chemistry. 

Kennebec County Prize, twenty-five dollars, the gift of the Hon. 
William T. Haines, LL. D., Waterville, a graduate of the university of 
the class of 1876, is awarded to that member of the senior class who 
writes the best thesis on applied electricity. 

Franklin Danforth Prize, ten dollars, the gift of the Hon. Edward 
F Danforth, Skowhegan, a graduate of the university of the class of 
1877, in memory of his father, Franklin Danforth, is awarded to that 
member of the senior class in an agricultural curriculum who attains 
the highest standing. 

Father Harrington Prize, twenty dollars, established by Rev. John 
M. Harrington, pastor of St. Mary's Church, Orono, is given to that 
student who writes the best essay upon modern literature. It may treat 
of German, English, French, Spanish, or Italian literature. The essay 
may be limited to any one of these literatures or to a comparative study 
of any number of them. This is open to any student in the university. 

These essays must be deposited with the Registrar before May 1. 

Pharmacy Prize, five dollars, is awarded to that student in the Phar- 
macy department who attains the highest standing in chemistry in the 
last year of his course. 

Holt Prizes, the gift of Dr. Erastus Eugene Holt, of Portland, are 
given to the three students of the senior class who show the greatest 
improvement in their physical rating. The rating will be determined 
from deductions made from the gymnasium and class records of the 
students at the beginning and end of their college course by the mathe- 
matical formula for the normal earning abililty of the body devised by 
Dr. Holt. 

American Pharmaceutical Association Prize, membership for one 
year in the association, is awarded by the faculty to the member of the 
senior class in Pharmacy who has made the best record in his college 
course. 

The American Law Book Company Prize, consisting of a complete 
set of "Cyc" with annual annotations to date, is given to the student 
in the College of Law who shall take the highest scholarship honor for 
the period of his senior year. The method of award is left to the faculty 
of the College of Law. 



41 



University of Maine 

The Callaghan and Company Prize, consisting of the Cyclopedic 
Law Dictionary, is given (to the student in the College of Law who has 
obtained the highest general average for his junior year. 

Class of 1908 Commencement Cup is awarded each year to the class 
having the largest percentage of its membership present at Commence- 
ment. 

Fraternity Commencement Cup is awarded to the fraternity, the 
largest percentage of whose alumni register during commencement week. 

Fraternity Scholarship Cup, presented to the university by the 
1910 Senior Skull Society, is awarded at Commencement to that frater- 
nity having the highest standing in scholarship for the preceding cal- 
endar year. The cup is to be awarded for eleven years, 1910 to 1920 
inclusive. The fraternity to which this cup is awarded the greatest 
number of times is to be the permanent owner of the cup. 

Junior Mask Cup, presented by the Junior Mask Society, is awarded 
at Commencement to the fraternity whose freshman delegation has the 
highest standing in scholarship for the first semester. 

Wingard Cup, the gift of Professor Edgar R. Wingard, is awarded 10 
that student who has won his "M" in athletics and who has made the 
greatest improvement in his studies during the year. 

ADMISSION 

General Requirements. — Candidates for admission should apply to 
the Registrar for an application card. They must present satisfactory 
certificates of fitness, or pass the required examinations, and make a 
cash deposit covering the bills of one semester. In the College of Law 
the fees must be paid in advance and no additional deposit is required. 
The university admits men and women, both residents of Maine and 
non-residents. 

Admission to Advanced Standing. — Candidates for advanced standing 
are examined in the preparatory studies, and in those previously pur- 
sued by the classes they wish to enter, or in other equivalenit studies. 
A rank of B must be attained in order to pass any course without class 
attendance. Certificates from approved schools are accepted for the 
preparatory work; but certificates are not accepted for any part of the 
college work, unless such work has been done in a college. Students 
tranferring from another college must present a letter of honorable 
dismission. 



42 



Admission 

Special Students. — Persons 21 years of age, not candidates for a 
degree, may be admitted as special students if they give satisfactory 
evidence that they are prepared to take the desired subjects. 

Admission to Short Courses 

Candidates for the two years Curriculum in Pharmacy must be at 
least seventeen years of age, and must have successfully completed at 
least two years 'in an approved high school. Such candidates must offer 
three years of high school work in the fall of 1916, and four years in 
1919 and thereafter. 

Candidates for the two years Course in Home Economics must be 
graduates of a recognized high school or its equivalent, and they should 
have some practical knowledge of housework. 

Candidates for admission to the two years School Course in Agri- 
culture must be over fifteen years of age and prepared for advanced 
grammar or high school work. 

Admission by Examinations 

Entrance examinations are held at Orono, beginning four days before 
the opening of the fall semester, and on the Wednesday, Thursday, 
Friday, and Saturday preceding Commencement. To save expense to 
candidates, examination papers will be sent to any satisfactory person 
who will consent to conduct examinations on the days appointed in June. 
If possible, these examinations should be in charge of the principal of 
the school. Papers will not be sent at any other time. The questions 
are to be submitted under the usual restrictions of a written examina- 
tion, and the answers returned to the university immediately, accom- 
panied by the endorsement of the examiner. The examination must be 
given on the days appointed in the schedule. Applications for such 
examinations must be made out on blanks to be obtained from the 
Registrar. Candidates for admission by examination, particularly those 
examined at Orono in September, should present statements from the'r 
school principals regarding their fitness to take the examinations and to 
undertake college work. 

The examinations given by the College Entrance Examination Board 
will be accepted by the University. These examinations will be held 
during the week June 12-17, 1916. All applications for these examina- 
tions must be addressed to the Secretary of the College Entrance Exami- 

43 



University of Maine 

nation Board, Post Office Sub-Station 84, New York, N. Y., and must 
be made upon a blank form to be obtained from the Secretary of the 
Board upon application. 

A candidate who wishes 'to be examined on part of his work in 
advance of the year in which he proposes to enter the university may 
receive credit for such examination, provided he has completed not less 
than one-half of his preparatory work. It is advised that candidates 
avail themselves of this privilege as far as possible. Examinations on 
subjects which are to be continued in college should not be taken more 
than one year in advance. 

Admission of Graduates from Class A Schools in Maine 

Graduates from Maine high schools and academies placed by the State 
Superintendent of Schools in Class A may be admitted upon their school 
records, provided they have pursued a course of study including all the 
subjects required for admission to the curriculum that they propose to 
follow and a sufficient number of the elective subjects to make a total of 
fourteen and a half units. 

The school record of the candidate must be certified by the principal, 
upon blanks furnished by the university, and should be submitted be- 
fore August I. 

Admission by Certificate from Schools Outside of Maine 

Principals of schools situated outside of Ma'ine who desire the cer- 
tificate privilege must make application to the Dean of the University, 
and must furnish satisfactory evidence that the course of study in the 
school meets the requirements, for admission. Blank forms for this 
purpose will be supplied on request. 

Certificates will not be accepted for non-graduates except in unusual 
cases, and then only provided the candidate is expressly recommended! 
for admission by the principal of the high school from which he corner 
Certificates must be made out on blanks furnished by the university. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

To gain admission to any of the curricula leading to the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science, 14 1-2 units must be offered 
by the candidate, according to the following schedules (to count 



44 



Admission 

one unit, a subject must be persued for one school year, with five 
recitation periods a week): 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Required Subjects 

Foreign languages count 4 units 

English courts 3 " 

History " 1 unit 

Mathematics " 2J units 

iol units 
Not less, than two units of any foreign language may be offered. 
Credit for advanced work will be accepted at the rate of one unit for 
each year of work. 



Optional Subjects (4 units to be chosen) 

Greek counts 2 or 3 units 

Latin " 2, 3, or 4 " 

French " 2, 3, or 4 " 

German " 2, 3, or 4 

Advanced algebra 2 unit 

Solid geometry " 2 

Trigonometry " 2 

Chemistry (including note-book) " 

Physics (including note-book) 

Physiography (one-half or one year) " i unit or 

Biology (including note-book) " 

Eotany (including note-book) " 

Zoology (including notebook) " 

Physiology ' " 

Ancienit history (1 year) 

English history ( 1 year) 

American history and civil government (1 year) 
Medieval and modern history 



45 



University of Maine 

Colleges of Agriculture and Technology 

Required Subjects 

English counts 3 units 

*Algebra " ii " 

Flane geometry " 1 unit 

Solid geometry (College of Technology except Pharmacy) | " 

Foreign languages (two years of one language) " 2 units 

Sciences " 1 unit 

History " l " 

92 or 10 units 

Optional Subjects (4 1-2 or 5 units to be chosen) 

Each year of French counts 1 unit 

" German " 1 " 

" " Latin n 1 " 

" Greek H 1 " 

Advanced algebra " \ " 

Trigonometry " | " 

tMechanical drawing '. . . " \ " 

tManual training " i " 

Chemistry (including note-book) " 

Physics (including note-book) " 

Physiography (one-half year or one year) ....counts i unit or 

Biology (including notebook) counts 

Botany (including note-hook) " 

Zoology (including note-book) M 

Physiology " 

Roman history " 



* Candidates who have had two full years of algebra, including a 
review during the last year, and the use of an advanced text-book, may 
receive credit of two units. Such a course is recommended for those 
who wish to pursue a curriculum in engineering or chemistry. 

tGraduates from high schools giving a full manual training course 
may receive credit for mechanical drawing, manual training, and free- 
hand drawing, on the basis of one-half unit for live forty-five minute 
periods per week for one year in one subject taken in the high school. 

46 



Admission 

Greek history counts h unit 

English history " I or I " 

American history and civil government " 1 " 1 " 

Candidates for admission to any curriculum, who are well prepared in 
all the required subjects, but whose high school course has included 
studies other than the electives mentioned above, will be allowed to 
substitute such as will furn'ish a real equivalent. Each case of proposed 
substitution will be considered upon its merits. 

Credit for industrial and commercial subjects may be given at the 
discretion of the committee on admission. The total credit for these 
subjects will be limited to four units for admission to the Colleges of 
Agriculture and Technology, and to two units for the College of Arts 
and Sciences. 

The requirement in history will be satisfied by a year of Greek and 
Roman history, or a year of English history, or a year of medieval and 
modern history, or a year of American history and civil government. A 
choice will be allowed between the last half year of algebra and solid 
geometry for those who do not expect to continue mathematics in college. 

College of Law 

This college admits college graduates and such graduates of secondary 
institutions as are able to present fourteen and one-half units obtained 
in an approved school. 

REQUIREMENTS IN DETAIL 

The! following statement shows in detail the requirements in each 
subj ect : 

Languages 

English. — The entrance examination in English presupposes courses 
in composition and English literature pursued in the high school during 
four years. Prospective students are warned against attempting to pre- 
pare the required work in one year. Progress in composition particu- 
larly is of slow growth and requires almost daily cultivation during a 
long period of time. Books, to be thoroly enjoyed and appreciated, 
should be read leisurely and under favorable circumstances. 

Rhetoric. — Candidates are expected to have had practice in composi- 
tion for at least three days a week during the whole four years of the 



47 



University of Maine 

high school, and to have included in the latter part of their course such 
work in the elements of rhetoric as, for example, is contained in Car- 
penter's Rhetoric and Composition. 

Grammar. — The examination will include questions on the syntax of 
sentences, and on general grammatical principles. 

Weight of Composition. — The examination is mainly designed to test 
the candidate's ability to express his thought correctly and clearly. It 
is quite possible to answer all questions on the literature correctly, and 
yet fail on the examination as a whole because of crude and ungram- 
matical English. Prospective candidates are advised to give especial 
attention to spelling, punctuation, grammatical correctness, idiomatic 
words and phrases, sentence and paragraph formation. 

Subjects. — The subjects for the short compositions will be taken from 
the A list of books; also from the candidate's general knowledge and 
experience. 

The prescribed books are those adopted by the Conference on Uni- 
form Entrance Requirements. The A list is for general reading; the 
B list is for study. The candidate is not expected to have a detailed 
knowledge of these books, but such acquaintance with them as naturally 
follows intelligent and appreciative reading. Two books are to be 
selected from each group. 

Books in the A List 

Group I 

(For any unit of this group a unit from any other group may be 
substituted) Old Testament— Comprising the chief narrative episodes 
in Genesis, Exodus, Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings, and Daniel, together 
With the books of Ruth and Esther. Homer— The Odyssey, (English 
translation) with the omission, if desired, of Books I, II, III, IV, V, 
XV, XVI, XVII; The Iliad, (English translation) with the omission, if 
desired, of , Books XI, XIII, XIV, XV, XVII, XXL Vergil— ^Eneid 
(English translation). 

Group II 

Shakespeare — Merchant of Venice, Midsummer-Night's Dream, As 
You Like It, Twelfth Night, King Henry V, Julius Caesar. 

4 8 



Admission 

Group III 

Defoe — Robinson Crusoe, Part I. Goldsmith— The Vicar of Wake- 
field. Scott — Ivanhoe or Quentin Durward. Hawthorne — The House of 
the Seven Gables. Dickens — David Copperfield or A Tale of Two Cities. 
Thackeray — Henry Esmond. Gaskell — Cranford. Eliot — Silas Marner. 
Stevenson — Treasure Island. 

Group IV 

Bunyan — 'Pilgrim's Progress, Part I. Addison, Steele, and Budgell — 
The Sir Roger de Coverley Papers in "The Spectator." Franklin — Auto- 
biography. Irving — Sketch-Book. Macaulay — Essays on Lord Clive and 
Warren Hastings. Thackeray — English Humorists. Lincoln — Selections 
from, including the two Inaugurals, the Speeches in Independence Hall 
and at Gettysburg, the Last Public Address, and Letter to Horace 
Greeley, along with a brief memo'ir or estimate. Parkman — The Oregon 
Trail. Thoreau — Walden. Huxley — Autobiography and Selections from 
Lay Sermons, including the Addresses on Improving Natural Knowl- 
edge, A Liberal Education, and A Piece of Chalk. Stevenson — An In- 
land Voyage, and Travels with a Donkey. 

Group V 

Palgrave — Golden Treasury (First Series), Books II and III, with 
especial attention to Dryden, Collins, Gray, Cowper, and Burns. Gray — 
An Elegy in a Country Churchyard, and Goldsmith — The Deserted Vil- 
lage, combined. Coleridge — The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, and 
Lowell — The Vision of Sir Launfal, combined. Scott — The Lady of the 
Lake. Byron — Childe Harold, Canto IV, and the Prisoner of Chillon. 
Palgrave — Golden Treasury (First Series), Book IV, with especial at- 
tention to Wordsworth, Keats, and Shelley. Poe — The Raven ; Long- 
fellow — The Courtship of Miles Standish, and Whittier — Snow Bound, 
combined. Macaulay — Lays of Ancient Rome, and Arnold — Sohrab and 
Rustum, combined. Tennyson — Gareth and Lynette, Lancelot and Elaine, 
and The Passing of Arthur. Browning — Cavalier Tunes, The Lost 
Leader, How They Brought the Good News from Ghent to Aix, Home 
Thoughts from Abroad, Home Thoughts from the Sea, Incident of the 
French Camp, Herve Riel, Pheidippides, My Last Duchess, Up at a 
Villa, Down in the City. 



49 



University of Maine 

Books in the B List 

Shakespeare's Macbeth, Militon's Comus, L'Allegro, and II Penseroso. 
Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America, or Washington's Farewell 
Address, and Webster's First Bunker Hill Oration. Macaulay's Life of 
Johnson, or Carlyle's Essay on Burns. 

French. — The admission requirements in elementary and intermediate 
French are those recommended by the Modern Language Association 
of America. 

/. Elementary French. — At the end of the second year the pupil 
should be able to pronounce French accurately, to read at sight easy 
French prose, to put into French .simple English sentences taken from 
the language of everyday life or based upon a portion of the French 
text read, and to answer questions on the rudiments of the grammar as 
defined below. 

The first year's work should comprise: (i) careful drill in pronun- 
ciation; (2) the rudiments of grammar, including the inflection of the 
regular and the more common irregular verbs, the plural of nouns, the 
inflection of adjectives, participles, and pronouns; the use of personal 
pronouns, common adverbs, prepositions, and conjunctions; order ot 
words in the sentences, and elementary rules of syntax; (3) abundant 
easy exercises, designed not only to fix in memory the forms and prin- 
ciples of grammar, but also to cultivate readiness in reproducing natural 
forms of expression; (4) the reading of 100 to 175 duodecimo pages of 
graduated texts, with constant practice in translating into French easy 
variation of the sentences read (the teacher giving the English), and 
in reproducing from memory sentences previously read; (5) writing 
French from dictation. 

The second year's work should comprise: (1) the reading of 250 to 
400 pages of easy modern prose in the form of stories, plays, or histor- 
ical or biographical sketches; (2) constant practice; as in the previous 
year, in translating into French easy variations upon the texts read; (3) 
frequent abstracts, sometimes oral and sometimes written, of portions of 
the text already read; (4) writing French from dictation; (5) con- 
tinued drill upon the rudiments of grammar, with constant application 
in the construction of sentences ; (6) mastery of the forms and use of 
pronouns, pronominal adjectives, of all but the rare irregular verb 
forms, and of the simpler uses of the conditional and subjunctive. 



50 



Admission 

Suitable texts for the second year are: About, le Roi des montagnes; 
Bruno, le Tour de la France; Daudet, Easier Short Tales; De la 
Bedolliere, La Mere Michel ct son chat; Erckmann-Chatrian's Stories; 
Foa, Contcs biographiques and le Petit Robinson de Paris; Foncin, le 
Pays de France; Labiche and Martin, la Poudre aux yeux and le Voy- 
age de M. Perrichon; Legouve and Labiche, la Cigale chez les fourmis; 
Malot, Sans Famille; Mairet, la Tdche du petit Pierre; Merimee, 
Colomba; Extracts from Michelet ; Sarcey, le Siege de Paris; Verne's 
Stories. 

77. Intermediate French. — At the end of the third year the pupil 
should be able to read at sight ordinary French prose or simple poetry, 
to translate into French a connected passage of English based on the 
text read, and to answer questions involving a more thoro knowledge 
of syntax than is expected in the elementary course. 

This should comprise 'the reading of 400 to 600 pages of French of 
ordinary difficulty, a portion to be in the dramatic form ; constant prac- 
tice in giving French paraphrases, abstracts, or reproductions from mem- 
ory of selected portions of the matter read; the study of a grammar of 
moderate proportions ; writing from dictation. 

Suitable texts are: About's Stories; Augier and Sandeau, le Gendre 
de M. Poirier; Beranger's Poems; Corneille, le Cid and Horace; Cop- 
pee's Poems; Daudet, la Belle Nivernaise ; La Brete, Mon oncle et mon 
cure ; Madame de Sevigne's Letters ; Hugo, Hernani and la Chute; 
Labiche's Plays ; Loti, Pechcur d'Islande; Mignet's Historical Writings, 
Moliere, YAvare and le Bourgeois gentilhomme ; Racine, Athalie, 
Andromaque, and Esther; George Sand's Plays and Stories; Sandeau, 
Mademoiselle dc la Seiglicre; Scribe's plays; Thierry, Recits; Vigny, 
la Canne de jonc ; Voltaire's Historical Writings. 

At the end of the fourth year the pupils should be able to read at 
sight, with the help of a vocabulary of special or technical expressions, 
difficult French not earlier than that of the seventeenth century; to write 
in French a short essay on some simple subject connected with the 
works read ; to put into French a passage of easy English prose, and ^0 
carry on a simple conversation in French. 

This should comprise the reading of from 600 to 1,000 pages of stand- 
ard French, classical and modern, only difficult passages being explained 
in the class; the writing of numerous short themes in French; the 
study of syntax. 



51 



University of Maine 

Suitable reading matter will be: Beaumarchais's Barbier de Seville; 
Corneille's Dramas; the elder Dumas's Prose Writings; the younger 
Dumas's la Question d'argent; Hugo, Ruy Bias, Lyrics, and Prose 
Writings; La Fontaine's Fables; Lamartine, Gramella; Marivaux's 
Plays; Moliere's Plays; Musset's Plays and Poems; Pellissier, Mouve- 
ment litter aire au XIX siecle; Renan, Souvenirs d'enfance et de 
jcunesse; Rousseau's Writings; Sante-Beuve's Essays; Taine, Origines 
de la France contemporaine ; Voltaire's Writings; Selections from Zola, 
Maupassant, and Balzac. 

The examination of the College Entrance Certificate Board in ele- 
mentary French will be accepted for two units, and that in intermediate 
French for two additional units. 

German. — The admission requirements in elementary and advanced 
German are those recommended by the Modern Language Association 
of America. 

/. Elementary German. — The first year's work should comprise: (i) 
careful drill upon pronunciation; (2) memorizing and frequent repeti- 
tion of easy colloquial sentences; (3) drill upon the rudiments of gram- 
mar ; that is, upon the inflection of the articles, of such nouns as belong 
to the language of every-day life, of adjectives, pronouns, weak verbs, 
and the more unusual strong verbs ; also in the use of the more common 
prepositions, the simpler uses of the modal auxiliaries, and the elemen- 
tary rules of syntax and word order; (4) abundant easy exerciseb 
designed not only to fix in mind the forms and principles of grammar, 
but also to cultivate readiness in reproducing natural- forms of expres- 
sion ; (5) the reading of 75 to 100 pages of graduated texts from a 
reader, with constant practice in translating into German easy varia- 
tions upon sentences selected from the reading lesson (the teacher giv- 
ing the English), and in reproducing from memory sentences previously 
read. 

The second year's work should comprise: (1) the reading of 150 to 
200 pages of literature in the form of easy stories and plays; (2) ac- 
companying practice, as before, in translating into German easy varia- 
tions upon the matter read, also in the off-hand reproductions, some- 
times orally and sometimes in writing, of the substance of short and easy 
selected passages; (3) continued drill in the rudiments of grammar, to 
enable the pupil first, to use his knowledge with facility in forming sen- 
tences, and second, to state his knowledge correctly in the technical lan- 
guage of grammar. 



52 



Admission 

Stories suitable for the elementary course can be selected from the 
following list : Anderson, Mdrchen and Bilderbuch ohne Bilder; Baum- 
bach, Die Nonna and Der Schwiegersohn; Ger stacker, Germelshausen; 
Hcyse, UArrabbiata, Das Mddchen von Treppi, and Anfang und Endc ; 
Hillern, Hoher als del Kirche; Jensen, Die braune Erica; Leander, 
Traumercien and Kleine Geschichten; Seidel, Mdrchen; Stokl, Unter 
dem Christbaum; Storm, Immense e and Geschichten aus der Tonne; 
Zschokke, Der zerbrcchene Krug. 

The best shorter plays available are: Benedix, Der Prozess, Der 
Weiberfeind, and Gunstige Vorzeichen; Elz, Er ist nicht eifersiichtig ; 
Wichert, An der Major secke ; Wilhelmi, Einer muss heiraten. Only 
one of these plays need be read, and the narrative style should pre- 
dominate. A good selection of reading matter for the second year 
would be Anderson, Mdrchen or Bilderbuch, or Leander, Traumercien, 
to the extent of about forty pages. Afterward, such a story as Das 
Icalte Herz, or Der zerbrochene Krug; then Hoher als die Kirche, or 
Immense e; next a good story by Heyse, Baumhach, or Seidel; last Der 
Prozess. 

II. Advanced German. — The work should comprise, in addition to 
the elementary course, the reading of about 400 pages of moderately 
difficult prose and poetry, with constant practice in giving, sometimes 
orally and sometimes in writing, paraphrases, abstracts, or reproductions 
from memory of selected portions of the matter read; also grammatical 
drill in the less usual strong verbs, the use of articles, cases, auxiliaries 
of all kinds, tenses and modes (with especial reference to the infinitive 
and subjunctive), and likewise in word order and word formation. To 
do this work two school years are usually required. 

Suitable reading matter for the third year may be selected from such 
work as the following: Ebner-Eschenbach, Die Freiherren von Gem- 
pcrlein; Freytag, Die Journalist en and Bilder aus der deutchen Ver- 
gangenheit, Karl der Grosse, Aus den Kreuzziigen, Doktor Luther, 
Aus dem Staat Friedrichs des Gross en; Fouque, Undine; Gerstacker, 
Irrfahrten; Goethe, Hermann und Dorothea and Iphigenie; Heine's 
poems and Reisebilder; Hoffman, Historische Erzdhlungen; Lessing, 
Minna von Barnhelm; Meyer, Gustav Adolf s Page; Moser, Der Biblw- 
thekar; Riehl, Novellen, Burg Neidecix, Der Fluch der Schonheit, Der 
Stumme Ratsherr, Das Spielmannskind; Rosegger, Waldheimat; Sch : l- 
ler, Der Neffe als Onkel, Der Geisterscher, Wilhelm Tell, Die Jungfrau 
von Orleans, Das Lied von der Glocke, Balladen; Scheffel, Der Trom- 



53 



University of Maine 

peter von Sdkkingcn; Uhland's poems; Wildenbruch, Das cdle Bint. A 
good selection would be: (i) one of Riehl's novelettes; (2) one of 
Freytag's "pictures;" (3) part of Undine or Der Geisterscher ; (4) a 
short course of reading in lyrics and ballads; (5) a classical play by 
Schiller, Lessing, or Goethe. 

The examinations, of the College Entrance Certificate Board in ele- 
mentary German will be accepted for two units, and that in advanced 
German for one additional unit. 

Spanish. — The admission requirements in Spanish are those of the 
College Entrance Examination Board. 

Elementary Spanish. — At the end of the second year of the ele- 
mentary course the pupil should be able to pronounce Spanish accu- 
rately, to read at sight easy Spanish prose, to put into Spanish simple 
English sentences taken from the language of everyday life or based 
upon a portion of the Spanish text read, and to answer questions on 
the rudiments of the grammar, as indicated below. 

The first year's work should comprise: (1) Careful drill in pronun- 
ciation ; (2) the rudiments of grammar, including the conjugation of 
the regular and the more common irregular verbs, the inflection of 
nouns, adjectives, and pronouns, and the elementary rules of syntax; 

(3) exercises containing illustrations of the principles of grammar; 

(4) the careful reading and accurate rendering into good English of 
about ico pages of easy prose and verse, with translation into Spanish 
o f easy variations of the sentences read; (5) writing Spanish from 
dictation. 

The second year's work should comprise: (1) The reading of about 
200 pages of prose and verse; (2) practice in translating Spanish in'o 
English, and English variations of the text into Spanish; (3) con- 
tinued study of the elements of grammar and syntax; (4) mastery 
of all but the rare irregular verb forms and of the simpler uses of the 
modes and tenses; (5) writing Spanish from dictation; (6) memorizing 
of easy short poems. 

The emphasis should be placed on careful thoro work with much 
repetition rather than upon rapid reading. The reading should be 
selected from the following: A collection of easy short stories and 
lyrics, carefully graded; Juan Valera, El pdjaro verde ; Perez Escrich, 
Fortuna; Ramos Carrion and Vital Aza ; Zaragiieta; Palacio Valdes, 
Jose; Pedro de Alarcon, El Capitdn Veneno; the selected short stories 
of Pedro de Alarcon or Antonio de Trueba. 



54 



Admi 



Latin. — The entrance examination in Latin will consist of four parts, 
as follows: 

i. An examination on the elements of Latin grammar and easy trans- 
lations. 

2a. An examination in sight translation of Latin prose suited to test 
the ability of a candidate who has read from Caesar (Gallic War and 
Civil War) and Xepos (Lives) an amount not less than Caesar, Gallic 
War, I-IV. 

b. Questions on the ordinary forms and constructions of Latin gram- 
mar and the translation of easy English sentences into Latin. 

3a. An examination on Cicero, speeches for the Manilian Law and 
for Archias, with questions on subject-matter, literary and historical 
allusions, and grammar. 

b. An examination in sight translation of Latin prose adapted to 
candidates who have read from Cicero (speeches., letters, and De Senec- 
tute) and Sallust (Catiline and Jugurthine War) an amount not less 
than Cicero, speeches against Catiline I-IV, for the Manilian Law, and 
for Archias. 

c. A test in writing simple Latin prose which shall demand a thoro 
knowledge of all regular inflections, all common irregular forms., and 
the ordinary syntax and vocabulary of the prose authors read in school. 

4a. An examination on Vergil, ^neid, I, II, and either IV or VI 
at the option of the candidate, with questions on subject matter, literary 
and historical allusions, and prosody. 

b. An examination in sight translation of Latin poetry adapted to 
candidates who have read from Vergil (Bucolics., Georgics, and ^Eneid) 
and Ovid (Metamorphoses, Fasti, and Tristia) an amount not less than 
Vergil, ^Eneid, I-VI. 

A candidate may obtain separate credit for each part except in die 
College of Arts and Sciences. Each represents a year's work and 
entrance credit for one unit. 

In parts 2 and 3 candidates must deal satisfactorily with both the 
sight and set passages, or they will not be given credit for either. 

Greek. — The grammar, including prosody; Xenophon's Anabasis, books 
I-IV ; Homer's Iliad,, books I-III ; the sight translation of easy passages 
from Xenophon ; the translation into Greek of easy passages based on 
the required books of the Anabasis. For the last a vocabulary of le.->s 
usual words will be furnished. Equivalent readings will be accepted in 
place of those prescribed. 



DD 



University of Maine 

History 

Greek History. — History of Greece, to the capture of Corinth, 146 
B. C. ; Myers, Morey, or Botsford. 

Roman History. — A knowledge of Roman history, down to the death 
of Marcus Aurelius, such as may be obtained from Allen's Short His- 
tory of the Roman People, or from Myers's Rome: Its Rise and Fall, 
or from Morey's Outlines of Roman History. 

English History. — A knowledge such as may be obtained from Mont- 
gomery, Coman and Kendall, Terry, or Cheyney's History of England. 

United States History and Civil Government. — A knowledge such 
as may be obtained from the works of Fiske, Hart, Montgomery, oi 
McLaughlin. 

Mathematics 

Algebra. — The four fundamental operations for rational algebraic 
expressions ; factoring, determination of highest common factor and 
least common multiple by factoring; fractions, including complex frac- 
tions, and ratio and proportion ; linear equations, both numerical and 
literal, containing one or more unknown quantities ; problems depend- 
ing on linear equations ; radicals, including the extraction of the square 
root of polynomials and of numbers ; exponents, including fractional 
and negative; quadratic equations, -both numerical and literal; simple 
cases of equations with one or more unknown quantities, that may be 
solved by the methods of linear or quadratic equations ; problems 
depending on quadratic equations ; the binomial theorem for positive 
integral exponents ; the formulas for the wth term and the sum of the 
terms of arithmetical and geometrical progressions, with applications. 

It is assumed that pupils are required thruout the course to solve 
numerous problems which involve putting questions into equations. Some 
of the problems should be chosen from mensuration, from physics, and 
from commercial life. The use of graphical methods and illustrations, 
particularly in connection with the solution of equations, is also ex- 
pected. 

Plane Geometry. — The usual theorems and constructions of good 
textbooks, including the general properties of plane rectilinear figures ; 

56 



Admission 

the circle and the measurement of angles; similar polygons; areas; regu^ 
lar polygons and the measurement of the circle. 

Solid Geometry. — The usual theorems and constructions of good text- 
books, including the relations of planes and lines in space ; the prop- 
erties and measurement of prisms, pyramids, cylinders, and cones; the 
sphere and the spherical triangle. 

Trigonometry. — Definitions and relations of the six trigonometric 
functions as ratios; circular measurement of angles; proofs of principal 
formulas, in particular for the sine, cosine, and tangent of the sum and 
the difference of two angles, of the double angle and the half angle; 
the product expressions for the sum or the difference of two sines or of 
two cosines, etc. ; the transformation of trigonometric expressions by 
means of these formulas ; solution of trigonometric equations of a sim- 
ple character; theory and use of logarithms (without the introduction 
of work involving infinite series) ; the solution of right and oblique tri- 
angles, and practical applications, including the solution of right spher- 
ical triangles. 

Advanced Algebra. — Permutations and combinations, limited to simple 
cases ; complex numbers, with graphical representation of sums and 
differences; determinants, chiefly of the second, third, and fourth orders, 
including the use of minors and the solution of linear equations; 
numerical equations of higher degree, and so much of the theory of 
equations, with graphical methods, as is necessary for their treatment, 
including Descartes' s rule of signs and Horner's method, but not Sturm's 
functions or multiple roots. 

Sciences 

*Biology. — This may consist of a continuous course for one year 
dealing with the problems of general biology, including the study of 
the structure, functions, and habits of both plants and animals; a course 
for one year in botany alone; a course for one year in zoology alone; 
or a course for one-half year in human physiology. The human physi- 
ology may be arranged to form a part of the general biology, or of the 
zoology; but in such cases it must be treated as an integral part of the 
subject under consideration. 



57 



University oi Maine 



"Chemistry. — The necessary ground is covered by the following text- 
books: Brownlee and others. Hessler and Smith, McPherson and Hen- 
derson. Newejl. 

Physical Geography (Physiography). — A satisfactory preparation 
may be obtained from either Appleton's or Tarr's Physical Geography. 

*Physics. — The wcrk usually covered in one year in a good fitting 
school. 

The requirements in botany and zoology are the same as those of the 
College Entrance Examination Board, and are outlined in the syllabus 
of the board. The note-book should include properly labeled drawings, 
and descriptions of experiments, representing as much of the work in 
this syllabus as may be practicable, and should be the record of a year's 
laboratory work in the subject. The making of an herbarium is optional. 



*The work in these sciences must include certiried note-books exhib- 
iting the results of experimental work performed by the student. In 
physics forty exercises are required and in chemistry fifty exercises. 
These note-books should be presented at the examination. In the case 
of students certified in the sciences, the principal is expected to pa : s 
upon the quality of the note-books rather than send them to the uni- 
versitv. 



58 



Organization of the University. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE UNIVERSITY 



The university Is divided for purposes of administration into the 
Colleges of Agriculture, Arts and Sciences. Law, and Technology, and 
the Maine Agricultural Experiment Station. The policies of the Uni- 
versity as a unit are determined by the Board of Trustees and the 
General Faculty, but each division regulates those affairs which con- 
cern itself alone. 

College of Agriculture 

Curricula in Agronomy, Animal Husbandry, Biology, Dairy Hus- 
bandry, Forestry, Home Economics, Horticulture, Poultry Husbandry, 
and for Teachers of Agriculture 

Two Years Course in Home Economics for Teachers; School 
Course in Agriculture (two years) 

Short Courses; Farmers' Week; Correspondence and Lecture 
Courses; Demonstration Work 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Major subjects may be selected in Biology, Chemistry, Economics 
and Sociology, Education, English, French, German, Greek and Clas- 
sical Archeology, History, Latin, Mathematics and Astronomy, Fhi- 
losophy, Physics, and Spanish and Italian 

College of Law 
This College is located in Bangor 

College of Technology 

Curricula in Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, 
Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Pharmacy 



59 



University of Maine 

Maine Agricultural Experiment Station 

Offices and principal laboratories in Orono ; Highmoor Farm in Mon- 
mouth; Aroostook Farm at Presque Isle 



Graduate Courses leading to the Master's degree are offered by 
various departments 

Summer Term of six weeks 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

The college year is divided equally into a fall semester and a spring 
semester. Five recitation hours a week of successful work for one 
semester entitle a student to one unit. The minimum regular work for 
a semester in the College of Arts and Sciences is fourteen hours a 
week (exclusive of physical training and military science) leading to 
two and four-fifths units. In the College of Agriculture and the 
College of Technology the minimum is seventeen hours a week (ex- 
clusive of physical training and military science), leading to three and 
two fifths units. Six units in the major subject represent the minimum 
requirement for a degree. 



60 



General Information 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



FACULTY OF INSTRUCTION 

LEON STEPHEN MERRILL, M. D. 

Director of Agricultural Extension Service 
Dean 
LUCIUS HERBERT MERRILL, Sc. D. 

Professor of Biological and Agricultural Chemistry 
FREMONT LINCOLN RUSSELL, B. S., V. S. 

Professor of Bacteriology and Veterinary Science 
MINTIN ASBURY CHRYSLER, Ph. D. ' Professor of Biology 
JOHN MANVERS BRISCOE, M. F. Professor of Forestry 

GEORGE EDWARD SIMMONS, M. S. Professor of Agronomy 

BLISS S BROWN, M. S. Professor of Horticulture 

LAMERT SEYMOUR CORBETT, M. S. 

Professor of Animal Industry 
FRANCES ROWLAND FREEMAN, M. S. 

Professor of Home Economics 
EDSON FOBES HITCHINGS, C. E., M. S. 

Associate Professor of Horticulture 
ALICE MIDDLETON BORING, Ph. D. 

Associate Professor of Zoology 
HARRY NEWTON CONSER, M. S, M. A. 

Assistant Professor of Botany 
RALPH WOODBURY REDMAN, B. S. 

Assistant Director of Agricultural Extension Service 
HAROLD SCOTT OSLER, B. S. Assistant Professor of Agronomy 
CARLETON WHIDDEN EATON, A. B., M. F. 

Assistant Professor of Forestry 
HARRY WOODBURY SMITH, B. S. 

Assistant Professor of Bacteriology 

61 



College of Agriculture 

FRANCES MARIE WHITCOMB, B. S. 

Assistant Professor of Home Economics 
CLARENCE WALLACE BARBER, M. S. 

Extension Representative, Cumberland County 
JOSEPH HENRY BODWELL, B. S. 

Extension Representative, Piscataquis County 
CLARENCE ALBERT DAY 

Extension Representative, Washington County 
ARTHUR LOWELL DEERING, B. S. 

Extension Representative, Kennebec County 
MAURICE DANIEL JONES, B. S. 

Extension Representative, Penobscot County 
WILSON MONTGOMERY MORSE, B. S. 

Extension Representative, Franklin County 
HAROLD HARLAN NASH 

Extension Representative, York County 
HAROLD JOSEPH SHAW 

Extension Representative, Sagadahoc County 
GEORGE NEWTON WORDEN, B. S. 

Extension Representative, Cumberland County 
GEORGE ALBERT YEATON 

Extension Representative, Oxford County 
PAUL WHEELER MONOHON, B. S. 

Assistant State Leader, Farm Demonstration Work 
RALPH PIKE MITCHELL 

In charge of Boys' Agriculture Club Work 
MARIE WILHELMINA GURDY, B. S. 

In Charge of Girls Agriculture Club Work 
WILLIAM COLLINS MONAHAN, B. S. 

In Charge of Poultry Extension Work 
JAMES EVERETT CHAPMAN, B. A., M. S. 

Extension Instructor in Soils 
CATHARINE NORTON PLATTS, B. S. 

Extension Representative in Home Economics 
DOROTHEA BEACH Instructor in Home Economics 

ALEXANDER LURIE, B. S. Instructor in Horticulture 

SIDNEY WINFIELD PATTERSON, B. S, 

Instructor in Biological and Agricultural Chemistry 
GLEN BLAINE RAMSEY, A. B. Instructor in Biology 



62 



General Information 

NEIL CARPENTER SHERWOOD, B. S. 

Instructor in Animal Industry 
WILBERT AMIE CLEMENS, Ph. D. Instructor in Biology 

LAWRENCE VIVIAN JONES, LL. B. Lecturer on Forestry Law 

HELEN ANN KNIGHT, Ph. B. Instructor in Home Economics 

ALTON WILLARD RICHARDSON, B. S. 

Instructor in Animal Industry 
STANLEY BEN SINK, B. Sc. Instructor in Agronomy 

J FRED THOMAS, B. S. Instructor in Animal Industry 

WILLIS CARL LANE, B. S. Assistant in Biology 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The College of Agriculture comprises the departments of Agricultural 
Extension, Agronomy, Animal Industry, Biological and Agricultural 
Chemistry, Biology, Farm Management and Agricultural Engineering, 
Forestry, Home Economics, Horticulture, Veterinary Science and Bac- 
teriology. The aim of this college is to train young men for service 
as farmers, teachers of agriculture and the allied sciences in schools and 
colleges, investigators, in agricultural experiment stations, and foresters ; 
and to prepare young women to become teachers of home economics 
and to comprehend the problems of administration in the home and in 
public institutions. On entering either a four years curriculum or the 
two years School Course in Agriculture a student is required to fill out 
a practical experience blank. Those who have not had experience in 
general farming are required to work during at least one summer vaca- 
tion on some farm approved by the faculty of the college. 

The college curricula are designed for those who wish to follow gen- 
eral farming, animal husbandry, dairy husbandry, poultry husbandry, 
horticulture, home economics, chemistry as related to experiment station 
work, biological chemistry, bacteriology and veterinary science, biology, 
farm management, and forestry either as a business or as a profession. 

One of the following curricula, embracing 150 college hours each, is 
required for the students taking a four years curriculum in the College 
of Agriculture. 

The courses of instruction are organized as follows : 



63 



College of Agriculture 

1. Regular Curricula 

The four years general curricula in Agronomy, Animal Hus- 
bandry, Biology, Dairy Husbandry, Forestry, Home Economics, 
Horticulture, and Poultry Husbandry, and the four years cur- 
riculum for Teachers in General Agriculture 

2. Short Courses 

The two years Teachers' Course in Home Economics 
The two years School Course in Agriculture 

The short winter courses in General Agriculture, Dairying, Horti- 
culture, and Poultry Management 
Farmers' week 

3. Extension Courses 

The correspondence courses 
The lecture courses 
The traveling schools 

CURRICULA IN AGRICULTURE 

Certain studies are fundamental to all work in agricultural lines. As 
many as possible of these subjects are offered in the first two years, 
during which the student is necessarily given no choice of subjects. 
By the beginning of the junior year each student must decide whether 
he is to specialize in Agronomy, Animal Husbandry, Dairy Husbandry, 
Poultry Husbandry, Horticulture, or Biology. To specialize in any one 
of these lines, he must during his junior and senior years take the 
studies given in the schedules which follow. 

Students in agriculture who contemplate entering experiment station 
work should elect the course offered by the department of agricultural 
chemistry covering the qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis 
of fodders, fertilizers, and dairy products. They should also elect a 
preparatory course in quantitative chemical analysis. 

The elective subjects are selected with the advice of the major in- 
structor. 



64 



The College Curricula 

Curriculum for the First Two Years for All Students 
Taking Four Years Curricula in Agriculture 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Subject Hours 

Agronomy u, f4 . 2 

Chemistry i or 3 2 

Chemistry 5, f 4 2 

Drawing 9, *3 1 

Public Speaking 3 1 

English 7 2 

Military 1, *3 1 

Modern Language 3 

Zoology 1, 2 t4 4 



Spring Semester 
Subject Hours 

Animal Industry 2 2 

Animal Industry 4, f 2 1 

Botany 2, 2 t4 4 

Chemistry 2 or 4 3 

Chemistry 6, t4 2 

Drawing 10, *3 1 

Public Speaking 1 

English 8 2 

Military 2, *3 t 



Physical Training 1 i Modern Language 2 

Physical Training 2 1 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Agronomy 1, 2 *3 3 

Animal Industry 3 2 

Animal Industry 5, f2 1 

Biochemistry 1 2 

Biology 3 2 

Chemistry 15, 2 f2 3 

Mathematics 11 3 

Military 1, *3 1 

Poultry Husbandry 1, 2 t2 . . . 3 



Agronomy 12, 2 f2 3 

Biochemistry 2, 3 t4 5 

Biology 8, 2 t4 4 

Horticulture 2, 2 *3 3 

Mathematics 12 2 

Military 2, ^3 1 

Poultry Husbandry 2, 1 t2 ... 2 



65 



College of Agriculture 



Curriculum for Students Specializing in Agronomy 



Fall Semester 



Subject 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Hours Subject 



Spring Semester 



Hours 



Agronomy 13, i t2 2 

Animal Industry 7, 2 t4 4 

Bacteriology 1, t6 3 

Bacteriology 3 2 

Biology 9, 2 f 6 5 

English 17 2 

Elective 2 



Agricultural Chemistry 6 2 

Agronomy 14, 1 f 2 2 

Agronomy 16, I f 2 2 

Agronomy 18 2 

Animal Industry 6 2 

Biology 10, 2 f 6 5 

English 18 2 

Elective 3 



SENIOR YEAR 

Agronomy 3 2 Farm Management 2, t4 2 

Agronomy 15, 1 f2 2 Farm Management 72, 2 *3 ... 3 

Farm Management 71, 2 *3 ... 3 Farm Management 74, 2 *3 . . . 3 

Elective 10 Elective 7 



Note. Biology 18, Entomology, will be required of Seniors in 1915-16 
Curricula for Students Specializing in Animal Industry 
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Subject 
Animal Industry 7, 2 f4 

Bacteriology 1, f6 

Bacteriology 3 

Biology 51, 2 f4 

English 17 

Farm Management 71, 2 



Spring Semester 



Hours Subject Hours 

. . . 4 Agricultural Chemistry 6 2 

. . . 3 Animal Industry 6 2 

. . . 2 Animal Industry 52, t2 I 

. . . 4 Bacteriology 52, t6 3 

. . . 2 Biology 52, 2 f 4 4 

. . . 3 English 18 2 

Veterinary Science 14 3 

Veterinary Science 16 1 



66 



The College Curricula 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Subject Hours 

Agronomy 3 2 

Animal Industry 53 2 

Veterinary Science 15 2 

Veterinary Science 17 1 

Veterinary Science 19 2 

Elective 9 



Spring Semester 
Subject Hours 

Animal Industry 54 2 

Farm Management 2, t4 2 

Farm Management 72, 2 *3 . . . 3 
Elective 11 



Note. Biology 18, Entomology, will be required of Seniors in 1915-16 
DAIRY HUSBANDRY 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Animal Industry 7, 2 t4 4 

Bacteriology 1, f6 3 

Bacteriology 3 2 

English 17 2 

Farm Management 71, 2 *3 . . . 3 
Elective \ 



Agricultural Chemistry 6 2 

Animal Industry 6 2 

Animal Industry 8, 1 *6 3 

Bacteriology 52, t6 3 

English 18 2 

Veterinary Science 14 3 

Veterinary Science 16 1 

Elective 3 



SENIOR YEAR 



Agronomy 3 2 

Animal Industry 9, 2 *6 4 

Animal Industry 51 3 

Veterinary Science 15 2 

Veterinary Science 17 i 

Elective 6 



Bacteriology 102, t4 2 

Farm Management 2, f 4 2 

Farm Management 72, 2 *3 ... 3 

Elective 10 



67 



College of Agriculture 
POULTRY HUSBANDRY 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Son ester 



Subject 



Hours Subject 



Spring Semester 



Bacteriology i, t6 3 

Bacteriology 3 2 

Biology 51, 2 t4 4 

English 17 2 

Poultry Husbandry 3, 1 f 2 . . . 2 

Elective 2 



Hours 



Animal Industry 7, 2 J4 \ Agricultural Chemistry 6 2 



Animal Industry 6 

Biology 52, 2 t4 

English 18 

Poultry Husbandry 4, 1 t2 
Elective 



SENIOR YEAR 



Agronomy 3 2 

Farm Management 71, 2 *3 . . 3 

Poultry Husbandry 5 2 

Poultry Husbandry 7, 2 f 2 . . . 3 

Elective 7 



Farm Management 2, t4 2 

Farm Management 72, 2 *3 . . . 3 

Poultry Husbandry 6, 3 t2 . . . 4 

Veterinary Science 12 2 

Elective 6 



Note. Biology 8, Entomology, will be required of Seniors in 1915-16 
Curriculum in Horticulture 



Fall Semester 



Subject 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Spring Semester 



Hours Subject 



Hours 



Bacteriology 3 2 

Biology 9, 2 f 3 5 

English 17 2 

Horticulture 1, 2 12 3 

Horticulture 7, 2 f2 3 

Horticulture 9, 2 t2 3 



Agricultural Chemistry 6 2 

Animal Industry 6 2 

Bacteriology 2, f 6 3 

Biology 10, 2 t6 5 

English 18 2 

Horticulture 10 2 

Elective 2 



68 



The College Curricula 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Subject 

Agronomy 3 

Farm Management 71, 2 *3 

Horticulture 3, 2 f 2 

Horticulture 5, 2 f 2 

Horticulture 51 



Hours 
. . . 2 
... 3 
■-. 3 
.• 3 



Subject 



Spring Semester 



Hours 



Farm Management 2, f4 2 

Horticulture 4, 2 t2 3 

Horticulture 8, 2 f 2 3 

Horticulture 52 1 

Elective 9 



Elective 6 



Note. Biology 8, Entomology, will be required of Seniors in 1915-16 
Curriculum in Biology 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Bacteriology 3 2 Bacteriology 2 3 

English 17 2 English 18 2 

Geology 5 3 Modern Language 2 

Modern Language 3 Plant Pathology 66 j 

Plant Histology 61 j or I 3 

or - 4 Elective \ 

Vertebrate Anatomy 51 . . . ) Animal Embryology 52 . . . i 

Elective 3 Plant Physiology 62 > 4 

or ) 

Elective 4 



SENIOR YEAR 



Animal Physiology 53 . 
or Plant Taxonomy , 
and Morphology 63 . . 

Biology Seminar 

Thesis or Elective 

Vertebrate Anatomy 51 

or , 

Plant Histology 61 



Animal Embryology ) 

o r ^ [4 

Plant Physiology \ 

Animal Histology 54 4 

or Plant Pathology 66 3 

or Elective \ 

Biology Seminar 1 

Thesis or Elective 3 

Elective 6 



Elective 61 



69 



College of Agriculture 



The Forestry Curriculum 

A complete undergraduate curriculum is arranged which will serve 
as the basis not only for practical work in forestry, but also for a liberal 
education. During the first two years much attention is given to biology 
and civil engineering, both of which are important fundamental subjects 
upon which are built the technical forestry courses. A knowledge 
of the principles of forestry in its different branches is gained by the 
student, and considerable practical work is done in the forest. The 
woodlands belonging to the university, together with adjacent lands 
covered by young forest, furnish a field for the study of many forest 
problems. Field trips are made and demonstration thinnings and 
plantings made at various places thruout the State. 

The instruction in this department consists of lectures, recitations, 
laboratory, and field work; the latter consumes a considerable portion 
of the scheduled time during the junior and senior years. 

Curriculum in Forestry 

FRESH MAX YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Subject 

Chemistry i or 3 

Chemistry 5, ^4 2 

Drawing 1, *6 2 

English 7 2 

Mathematics 1 and 3 5 

Military I, *3 I 

Zoology 1, 2 14 4 

Physical Training 



Hours 
. . 2 



Spring Semester 
Subject Hours 

Botany 2, 2 t4 4 

Chemistry 2 or 4 3 

Chemistry 6. "^4 2 

Drawing 2, *6 2 

English 8 2 

Mathematics 2 3 

Mathematics 4 2 

Military 2, *3 ; 

Physical Training 1 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Biology 8, 2 T4 ., 
Biology 68, 2 ?4 



Agronomy 1, 2 *3 3 

Biology 67, 2 t4 4 

Civil Engineering 1 2! Civil Engineering 

Public Speaking 3 ? 

English 9 2 

History 9 3 

Military I, *3 1 

Modern Language 3 Military 2, *3 1 

Modern Language 2 



4 

4 

1 

Civil Engineering 4 J 

Public Speaking 4 I 

English 10 2 

Horticulture 2, 2 *3 3 



70 



The College Curricula 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Subject Hours 

Biology 61, 2 t4 4 

Civil Engineering 21 1 

Civil Engineering 23 1 

Civil Engineering 27 1 

Forestry 11 2 

Forestry 13, *6 2 

Geology 5 3 

Horticulture 5, 2 f 2 . . 3 

Modern Language 3 



Spring Semester 
Subject Hours 

Biology 62 or 66 4 or 3 

Civil Engineering 22 1 

Civil Engineering 24 2 

Forestry 6 2 

Forestry 8, *6 1 

Forestry 10, *3 1 

Modern Language 2 

Physics 6 2 

Electives 3 



SENIOR YEAR 



Biology 3 

Forestry 1 

Forestry 3 

Forestry 5 

Forestry 9 

Forestry 15 2 

Forestry 17, *6 2 

Forestry 19 1 

Forestry 21 3 

Elective 4 



Biology 66 or 62 3 or 4 

Forestry 12 2 

Forestry 14, *6 2 

Forestry 16 2 

Forestry 18, *6 2 

Forestry 20 1 

Forestry 22 i 

Elective 4 



Four Years Curriculum in Home Economics 

This curriculum leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science. In 
addition to the prescribed studies, elective courses are offered for 
those who wish to teach. 

Students desiring to follow this curriculum must meet the regular 
university requirements. 

Laboratory fees are as follows : Courses 1, 2, 7, 8, 12, 13, each $1 a 
semester. Courses 5, 6, 10, 11, each $6 a semester. All materials for 
garment making must be provided by the students. 

Students taking courses 5, 6, 10, and 11 are required to wear in the 
laboratory white tailored waists, high collars, washable ties, caps, shoes 
with rubber heels, and white aprons with bibs. They must also he 
provided with small white hand towels. 



71 



College of Agriculture 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Subject Hours Subject Hours 

Chemistry i or 3 2 Chemistry 2 or 4 3 

Chemistry 5, t4 2 Chemistry 6, t4 2 

English 7 2 English 8 1 

History 7 3 History 8 3 

Home Economics 1, 1 t4 3 Home Economics 2, 1 t4 .... 3 

Home Economics 3, 1 t2 2 Home Economics 4, 1 f 2 . . . . 2 

Modern Language 3 Modern Language 2 

Physical Training \ Physical Training : 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Art 3 2 

Chemistry 15, 2 f2 3 

Elementary Physiology 5, 2 t4 -{ 

English 29 3 

Home Economics 5, 2 f 4 ... . 4 

Modern Language 3 



Art 4 2 

Botany 2, 2 f 4 4 

English 30 3 

Food Analysis 8, 1 16 4 

Home Economics 6, 2 t4 4 

Modern Language 2 



Physical Training 2 Physical Training 1 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Bacteriology I, f6 3 Home Economics 8, 2 f 4 ... . 4 

Bacteriology 3 ^ Home Economics 10, 3 t4 . . . 5 

Biochemistry 7, 3 f 4 5 Philosophy 52 3 

Home Economics 7, 2 t4 4 Physics 8, 4 $22 5 

Philosophy 51 3 Electives 3 

Electives 3 

SENIOR YEAR 

English 45 3 Home Economics 12, 3 f 2 4 

Home Economics 9 3 Home Economics 14 2 

Sociology 55 3 Sociology 56 3 

Elective 9 Elective 8 



Students desiring to teach should elect Education 51 and 52, and 
Home Economics 16. 



The College Curricula 

Two Years Curriculum in Home Economics 

This curriculum is offered for those students who can not meet the 
entrance requirements for the four years curriculum in Home Econo- 
mics. The work does not lead to a degree, but a certificate is granted 
when it is completed. For information regarding courses and fees, 
see the four years curriculum in Home Economics. After September, 
191 5, entering students zvill not be registered for this curriculum. 

FIRST YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Subject Hours 

Chemistry I or 3 2 

Chemistry 5, f4 2 

English 7 2 

Home Economics 1, 1 J4 3 

Home Economics 3, 1 t2 2 

History 7 3 

Home Economics 13, 1 f4 3 



Spring Semester 
Subject Hours 

Chemistry 2 or 4 3 

Chemistry 6 2 

English 8 2 

Home Economics 2, 1 f4 3 

Home Economics 4, 1 t2 2 

History 8 3 

Home Economics 14 2 



Physical Training h Physical Training 1 



SECOND YEAR 



Home Economics 5, 2 f4 4 

Home Economics 7, 2 t4 . . 
Bacteriology 1, f6 



■ 4 
. 3 
Bacteriology 3 2 



English 29 3 

Electives 4 



Home Economics 6, 2 f 4 4 

Home Economics 8, 2 t4 4 

English 30 3 

Electives 9 



Special Courses in Agriculture and Home Economics 

The Special Courses in Agriculture and Home Economics are designed 
for young men and women who cannot well spend four years in prepa- 
ration, but who desire to secure special training in this line. No fixed 
schedule of studies is prescribed, but students may elect along the line 
of horticulture, dairying, poultry management, veterinary science, agri- 
cultural chemistry, bacteriology, farm management, general agriculture, 
or home economics. 



73 



College of Agriculture 

Persons not candidates for a degree who wish to take special studies 
may be permitted to do so, if, upon examination, they give satisfactory 
evidence that they are prepared to take the desired studies. This privi- 
lege is intended for students of unusual maturity or previous advance- 
ment in particular subjects, and not for those who are incompetent to 
pursue a regular course. If they subsequently desire to become candi- 
dates for a degree, they will be required to meet all the entrance re- 
quirements. 

The annual expenses for courses of one year or more are the same as 
those for students in the four years curricula. Tuition is free to resi- 
dents of Maine except in Forestry and Biology. 

Two Years School Course in Agriculture 

This is a course designed to train young men and women who wish 
to become practical farmers, farm superintendents, dairymen, poultry- 
men, or gardeners, but who cannot devote time to high school or college 
training. 

The same equipment is used as in the four years curricula, but the 
^ork is of a more elementary nature. All the classes are separate and 
distinct from the four years classes, and in no case will college credit 
be allowed for work done in the School Course. 

There are no entrance examinations required of those who desire to 
enter the School Course. Students over fifteen years of age who are 
prepared for advanced grammar or high school work are eligible for 
registration. No tuition is charged in this course, but the same regis- 
tration and incidental fees of fifteen dollars a semester, or thirty dollars 
a year, are charged School Course students in agriculture as are charged 
all others attending the university. Fees amounting to two dollars and 
fifty cents are charged in each of the carpentry and blacksmithing 
courses to cover cost of material used. Fees are also charged in several 
agricultural laboratories. 

The practical side of the work in this course is strongly emphasized, 
and since students are expected to be able to do work and handle men 
when they have finished, those taking this course are required to spend 
the summer vacation between the first and second years in work either 
at the college or on some farm approved by the faculty. 

On completion of the course a certificate is awarded those who have 
satisfactorily done the work. 

The following is a schedule of the work given: 

74 



The College Curricula 



FIRST YEAR 



Fall Semester Spring Semester 
Subject Hours Subject Hours 
Animal Husbandry, 3 t2 \ Dairy Husbandry, 3 *3 4 



Business Arithmetic and Farm 

Accounts 2 

Carpentry, *3 I 

English 3 

Farm Crops, 3 *3 4 

Fruit Handling, 3*3 \ 

Poultry Husbandry 2 



English 3 

Farm Botany 2 

Forge Work, *3 1 

Fruit Growing, 3 *3 4 

Poultry Husbandry, 2 f 2 3 

Soils and Fertilizers, 3 *3 4 



SECOND YEAR 

Animal Husbandry, 3 f2 4 Animal Husbandry, 3 T2 4 

English 2 Engfeh 2 

Farm Chemistry 3 Farm Management, 3 *3 4 

Farm Crops 2 Forestry 2 

Farm Engineering and Me- Insects 2 

chanics, 1 *3 2 Poultry Husbandry 2 

Poultry Husbandry 2 Small Fruit Culture and Plant 

Vegetable Gardening, 3 *3 . . . 4 Propagation, 3 *3 4 

Veterinary Science 3 Veterinary Science 3 



Short Winter Courses in General Agriculture, Dairying.. 
Horticulture, and Poultry Management 

The short course in general agriculture deals especially with farm 
crops. Special attention is given to the potato, corn, oat, and hay 
crops, — the preparation of the seed bed, selection of seed, seeding, fer- 
tilization, culture, and harvesting. Such general subjects as drainage, 
maintenance of soil fertility, rotation of crops, control of weeds, etc., 
are considered. Potato, corn, and small grain judging is made a prom- 
inent feature. 

The short course in dairying is designed to meet the requirements 
of creamery assistants, practical farmers, herdsmen, and others who 
desire to learn milk testing, butter making, the principles of animal 
nutrition, and practices of feeding, breeding, judging stock, and the 
diseases of farm animals. 

75 



College of Agriculture 

The short course in horticulture is offered for those who wish :o 
acquaint themselves with the most approved methods of orchard man- 
agement. Special attention will be given to such subjects as the selec- 
tion of orchard sites, selecting and obtaining nursery stock, pruning, 
cultivation, spraying, packing, and cooperation in the fruit business. 
Opportunity will be given for the laboratory study of spraying, packing, 
planting, pruning, and grafting. An effort is made to show where 
money is lost and made in the fruit business. 

The short course in poultry management is given each year to aid 
persons who wish to gain a practical knowledge of the handling of incu- 
bators and brooders, the feeding and rearing of young chicks, the 
general management of mature fowls, scoring, judging, killing, and 
marketing. For purposes of instruction the College of Agriculture 
keeps representatives of the leading breeds of fowls. 

Very few text-books are used in any of the courses and the expenses 
for board and room, which are the only other expenses, are moderate. 
Circulars giving the dates and programs of these courses are published 
each year and will be sent upon application to the College of Agriculture. 

Farmers' Week 

There are a large number of people who cannot come to the college 
for a great length of time, but who desire a few days of practical 
instruction. To reach and accommodate these, "Farmers , Week" is held. 
Lectures on practical agricultural subjects are given morning, afternoon, 
and evening. Practical demonstrations occupy a part of each afternoon. 
Besides the practical subjects discussed, one or more sessions are given 
up to problems of rural betterment. A section is arranged where home 
economics for farmers' wives is taught. Dates and programs may be 
secured each year by addressing the College of Agriculture. 

Department of Agricultural Extension 

This department of the College of Agriculture offers correspondence 
courses, lecture courses, demonstration work, cooperative experiments, 
and extension schools in agriculture. 

This work is intended to give direct help to those on the farm and in 
the home; to aid those who desire definite instruction in practical agri- 
culture, animal and dairy husbandry, poultry husbandry, home econo- 
mics, forestry, and horticulture. It supplements the teaching and* 

7 6 



The College Curricula 

experimenting of the College of Agriculture and the Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station. It is professedly a popular work, because it endeavors to 
aid the farmer to solve the practical problems of the farm, to quicken 
agricultural work, and to inspire greater interest in country life. 

Correspondence Courses 

These courses are given by means of text-books and publications of 
the college, the U. S. Department of Agriculture, or of the various 
experiment stations. The text-books are furnished at publishers' prices. 
The courses are free and may be taken by individuals, granges, reading 
circles, or other organizations. A certificate will be given to students 
completing any of these courses with satisfactory standing. 
The following courses are offered : 

Course i — Farm Crops and Crop Production 

Course 2 — Farm Management 

Course 3 — Feeding and Breeding of Farm Animals and Dairying 

Course 4 — Poultry Keeping 

Course 5 — Fruit Growing 

Course 7 — Elementary Agriculture 

Course 8 — Home Economics 

Course 9 — Vegetable Gardening 

Course 10 — The Business of Dairying 

Lecture Courses 

Lectures in these courses are given under the auspices of granges, 
clubs, societies, and other gatherings by the members of the agricul- 
tural faculty. 

A complete list of the lectures will be forwarded on request. 

Demonstration Work 

For this work members of the agricultural faculty will make demon- 
strations, showing, as well as telling, how to solve many practical farm 
problems. These demonstrations are made on the farms and are offered 
under the same conditions as the lectures. 

The following is a partial list of the demonstrations that may be 
secured: home mixing of fertilizers; milk testing (use of Babcock 
tester); stock judging; corn and small grain judging and breeding; 
potato judging, breeding, and spraying; orchard spraying, pruning, and 

77 



College of Agriculture 

grafting; apple packing; method of killing and dressing poultry; 
method of determining the age of horses; methods of giving medicine 
to domestic animals. All demonstrations are accompanied by lectures. 

Farm Demonstration Work 

This form of extension service consists of practical demonstration of 
farming operations, of the values of various projects, and of proper 
equipment in the farming business. 

The demonstration work is now established in ten counties with every 
prospect of spreading to the remaining counties in the State within a 
few years. 

Boys' and Girls' Agricultural Clubs 

The organization of junior agricultural and home economics clubs was 
begun in 1913, under the direction of the Extension Department, with 
State Leaders in active charge of the field 1 work. The club work is 
conducted very largely in cooperation with the schools, granges, and 
the Y. M. C. A. county work. It will be extended thruout the State 
as rapidly as possible. Local exhibits will be held the present year and 
the winners at these exhibits will compete later in a State contest to be 
held at the College of Agriculture. 

Extension Schools in Agriculture 

To extend the advantages of agricultural instruction to persons 
actively engaged in agriculture, the Extension department will conduct 
a limited number of three day schools in various parts of the State. 
Members of the agricultural faculty will teach in these schools. 

Correspondence 

Besides the Demonstration, Correspondence, and Lecture courses, the 
College of Agriculture welcomes correspondence on practical farm 
topics. If information is desired along lines relating to crops, fertilizers, 
dairy work, feeding, or orcharding and gardening, the various in- 
structors are ready to give such assistance as they are able. 

A free publication, "Extension Bulletin", dealing with agricultural 
and home economics subjects, is issued at frequent intervals thruout 

78 



The College Curricula 

the year. This bulletin is sent to all persons whose names appear on 
the bulletin mailing list and to such other persons as may apply for 
same. 

Circulars giving full information upon these subjects will be sent 
upon request. 



College of Agriculture 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



Note. — A star (*) before the time designated for a course indicates 
that three hours of actual work are required to obtain credit for 
one hour; a dagger (t) indicates that two hours are required to 
obtain this credit: a double dagger (t) indicates that two and one- 
half hours are required. Courses having an odd number are given in the 
fall semester and those having an even number in the spring semester. 

If the student so elects, he may prepare a thesis upon some subject 
related to his major work. The subject should be selected and ap- 
proved by the head of the department before the close of the junior 
year. 

AGRONOMY 

Professor Simmons; Assistant Professor Osler; Mr. Sink 

Soils 

For undergraduates only 

I. Soils. — Lectures and recitations on the origin, types, physical prop- 
erties, moisture content, and distribution of soils, and their relation to 
crop production. The fundamental principles underlying soil manage- 
ment for soil conservation and improvement will be studied. Class 
room, two hours a week; laboratory, *three hours a week. 

3. Soil Fertility. — This course deals with stable manures, green 
manures, commercial fertilizers, and soil amendments ; also a study of 
soil organisms as affecting the plant food in the soil. Two hours a zveek. 



80 



Departments of Instruction 

For graduates and undergraduates 

52. Soil Surveying and Mapping. — A study is made of soil types, 
the principles of correlation and methods of soil surveying and map- 
ping. Class room, two hours a week; laboratory, * three hours a week. 

54. Soil Fertility. — Soid improvement investigation. A review of 
the experimental work in this country and abroad. The application of 
these results to soil improvement and crop production problems. Pre- 
requisites, Courses 1 and 3. Two hours a week. 

Crops 

For undergraduates only 

11. Field Crops. — A laboratory course in seed and grain identifica- 
tion, improvement by grading, testing, selecting, and preparing seed for 
planting. A collection of weeds and their seeds will be required. 'tFour 
hours a week. 

12. Field Crops. — A general course including a study of the most 
important cereal, grass, forage, and root crops, their adaptation to sys- 
tems of rotation, culture and uses, with special reference to New England 
conditions. Class room, two hours a week; laboratory, itw.o hours a 
week. 

13. Field Crops. Judging and Commercial Grading. — Comparative 
judging of corn, small grains, and potatoes, according to standards. A 
study of market grade requirements. Class room, one hour a week; 
laboratory, ttwo hours a week. 

14. Field Crops. Corn — A course dealing with the production of 
corn and the care and marketing of the crop. Types and varieties of 
both field and sweet corn will be considered in this course. Class room, 
one hour a week; laboratory, "ttwo hours a week. 

15. Field Crops. Roots and Tubers. — A course dealing with the 
production, storage, and marketing of roots and tubers. Class room, 
one hour a week; laboratory, \two hours a week. 

81 



College of Agriculture 

16. Field Crops. Grasses and Forage Crops. — Lectures and labora- 
tory work dealing with the grasses and forage plants. A study of the 
hay crop and markets ; soiling systems, and their adaptation to local con- 
ditions. Class room, one hour a week; laboratory, 1'two hours a we?'iz. 

18. Field Crops. Crop Improvement. — A study of the principles and 
methods involved in field crop improvement. The work of experiment 
stations in this country and abroad is reviewed. Prerequisites, Courses 
ii and 12. Two hours a week. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

62. Systematic Field Crops. — A course designed for advanced or 
graduate students preparing for experimental work, teaching, or plant 
breeding. Students will be expected to grow and collect material under 
the supervision of the department during the summer months. Prerequi- 
site, adequate training in botany and field crops. Time must be arranged 
with the instructor not later than the middle of the junior year. Two 
or more hours a week. 

63. Systematic Field Crops. — A continuation of Course 62. Two 
or more hours a week. 

65. Seminar. — A study of recent literature, problems, and experi- 
ments pertaining to Agronomy and Farm Management. One hour a 
week. 

66. Seminar. — A continuation of Course 65. One hour a week. 

67. 68. Thesis. — Three hours a week. 

ANIMAL INDUSTRY 

Professor Corbett; Mr. Thomas; Mr. Sherwood; Mr. Richardson 

Animal and Dairy Husbandry 

For undergraduates only 
2. Types and Breeds of Farm Animals. — A study of the types and 
breeds of farm animals. A course covering the history, development, 
and characteristics of farm animals. Two hours a week. 

82 



Animal Industry 

3. Care, Feed, and Management of Live Stock. — A course dealing 
with the selection, breeding, growing, and maintenance of horses, cattle, 
sheep, and swine. Prerequisites, Courses 2 and 4. Two hours a week. 

6. Live Stock Feeding. — A study of the general principles of nutri- 
students with the types an'd breed characteristics of farm animals, by use 
01 the score card, comparative judging, and the selection of breeding 
stock. To be taken in connection with Course 2. "\Two hours a week. 

5. Live Stock Judging. — A continuation of Course 4. ^Two hours 
a week. 

6. Live Stock Feeding. — A study of the general principles of nutri- 
tion as applied to live stock, composition of feed stuffs, comparison and 
use of feeding standards, calculating rations, methods of feeding for 
economic production. Prerequisites, Course 3, Biochemistry 1 and 2. 
Two hours a week. 

7. General Dairying. — Given by lectures, assigned readings, recita- 
tions, and laboratory practice. Milk; its secretion, composition, proper- 
ties, pasteurization, separation ; dairy practices in handling milk and 
cream, dairy equipment, use of common dairy machinery; preparation 
of starters; test of dairy products for fat (Babcock method), acidity, 
total solids, common adulterations, and preservatives. Class room, two- 
hours a week; laboratory, \four hours a week. 

8. Butter Making. — Lectures and laboratory practice in starter 
making, cream ripening, churning, and preparing butter for market. 
Prerequisite, Course 7. Class room, one hour a week; laboratory, "\si.v 
hours a week. 

9. Cheese Making. — Lectures, recitations, and laboratory practice 
in the manufacture and curing of various types of cheese, including 
Cheddar and soft cheeses adapted to the New England trade. The 
laboratory work requires six consecutive hours. Prerequisite, Course 7. 
Class room, two hours a week; laboratory *six hours a week. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

51. Dairy Technology. — A study of dairy products; dairy by-pro- 
ducts; factory machinery and operations; certified milk; markets and 
marketing; educational work with dairymen. Given by lectures, reci- 

83 



College of Agriculture 

tations, assigned readings, and round table conferences. Prerequisite, 
Course 7. Three hours a week. 

52. Advanced Live Stock Judging and Management. — A laboratory 
course in which the individual student gets experience in handling live 
stock and preparation of stock for the show ring and market. As far as 
possible, visits will be made to live stock farms. ^[Two hours a week. 

53. Advanced Live Stock Feeding and Management. — Nutrition 
and feeding experiments, as well as the methods and practices of the 
most successful feeders in the production of milk, meat, and the rearing 
of horses, are studied. Two hours a week. 

54. Advanced Animal Breeding. — Principles and theories of breed- 
ing as applied to the live stock industry; study of pedigrees and records 
by the use of the different herd books ; an economic study of the gen- 
erative systems of domestic animals. Prerequisites, Course 3, and 
Veterinary Science 6. Two hours a week. 

55. 56. Thesis. — Three hours a week. 

58. Ice Cream Making. — Lectures and recitations on the history 
and methods of the manufacture of ice cream and ices. Laboratory 
practice in the manufacture of ice cream and ices. Prerequisite, 
Course 51. Class room, one hour a week; laboratory, three hours a 
week. 

Poultry Husbandry 

For undergraduates only 

1. Types, Breeds, and Management of Poultry. — Lectures and 
recitations on the origin and development of the types, breeds, and 
varieties of fowl, ducks, geese, and turkeys; the general care, feed, and 
management of farm poultry; and the marketing of poultry products. 
Laboratory exercises include practice in poultry management, poultry 
judging, and the preparation of poultry products for market. Class 
room, two hours a week; laboratory, "ttwo hours a week. 

2. Types, Breeds, and Management of Poultry. — A continuation of 
Course 1. Class room, one hour a week; laboratory, "ttwo hours. 

84 



Poultry Husbandry 

3. Commercial Poultry Farming. — Lectures and recitations on the 
business of poultry farming; the systems and operations in use on large 
poultry farms ; the planning of specialized poultry farms. Class room, 
cue hour a week; laboratory, ^two hours a week. 

4. Poultry Feeding. — Lectures and recitations on the general prin- 
ciples of nutrition as applied to poultry; poultry feeds; calculating 
rations ; estimating cost of feeds and feeding, and methods of feeding 
for economical production. Prerequisites, Courses 1 and 2. Class 
room, one hour a week; laboratory, "\two hours a week. 

5. Poultry Literature. — A study of experimental data on poultry 
management. Prerequisites, Courses 1 and 2 and 4. Class room, two 
hours a week. 

6. Incubation and Brooding. — Lectures and recitations on the prin- 
ciples of incubation and brooding. Laboratory practice in incubator and 
brooder management. Prerequisites, Courses 1 and 2. Class room, 
three hours a week; laboratory, ttwo hours a week. 



Note. During incubation period, extra time will be required. 

7. Poultry Breeding. — Lectures and recitations on the principles of 
breeding as applied to poultry ; the inheritance of egg productivity ; 
systems of breeding ; mating of utility and exhibition poultry and care 
of breeding stock. Prerequisites, Courses 1, 2, and 4. Class room, 
two hours a week; laboratory, "\two hours a week. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

51, 52. Thesis. — Three hours a week. 

Bacteriology and Veterinary Science 

Professor Russell; Assistant Professor Smith 

For undergraduates only 

1. Bacteriology. — A laboratory course in general bacteriology. Open 
to all students. The work includes the preparation of the usual culture 
media and the study of the morphological and biological characteristics 



85 



College of Agriculture 

of typical bacteria. Some outside reading will be required. Required 
or students taking major work in Agriculture, "\Six hours a week. 

2. Bacteriology. — Similar to Bacteriology i. Offered for students 
in the College of Technology and others who may elect it. \Six hours 

eek. 

3. Bacteriology. — A lecture course open to all students. It should 
be elected by students taking Course 1 as well as by students not taking 
a laboratory course. Subjects considered will include the history of 
bacteriology; classification and biological characteristics of bacteria, 
bacteria in air, water, soil, and dairy products; the relation of bacteria 
to health and disease; immunity. Two hours a week. 

12. Veterinary Science. — This course deals with the anatomy, phy- 
siology, and diseases of poultry. Two hours a week. 

14. Veterinary Science. — A combined lecture and laboratory course 
dealing w T ith the anatomy and physiology of our domestic animals, and. 
their treatment to preserve and restore health. Three hours a week. 

15. Veterinary Science. — A continuation of Course 14. Two hours 
a week. 

16. Veterinary Science. — A clinic open to all students studying vet- 
erinary science. One hour a week. 

17. Veterinary Science. — A continuation of Course 16. One hour 
- *ek. 

19. Veterinary Science. — Veterinary materia medica and pharmacy. 
Two hours a week. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

Bacteriology. — A study of the physiology of bacteria; bacterio* 
logical analysis of water; and investigation into the sources of milk 
bacteria. Prerequisite, Course 1 or 2. Class room, one hour a week; 
laboratory, ^four hours a week. 



86 



Biological and Agricultural Chemistry 

53. Bacteriology. — A study of the physiology of bacteria; bacterio- 
logical analysis of water; and a study of soil bacteria. Prerequisite, 
Course 1 or 2. Class room, one hour a week; laboratory, tfour hours 
eek. 

Primarily for graduates 

101-102. Bacteriology. — This is a laboratory course for students who 
desire to pursue some particular line of bacteriological investigation. 
Open only to students who have done considerable work in bacteriology. 
The kind of work and the time will be arranged to suit individual stu- 
dents. 

Biological and Agricultural Chemistry 

Professor Merrill ; aIr. Patterson 
For undergraduates only 

1. Biochemistry. — Lectures and recitations on the composition of 
the plant ; the source, nature and assimilation of plant food ; fermen- 
tation, its nature, effects, and control. Two hours a week. 

2. Biochemistry. — A continuation of Course 1. The composition of 
the animal body and of food materials ; the adaptation of food to ani- 
mal requirements; the chemical changes involved in the digestion and 
assimilation of foods ; respiration ; absorption and liberation of energy. 
Class room, three hours a week; laboratory, ^ffour hours a week. 

3. Economic Geology. — A course in applied geology, including a gen- 
eral survey of our mineral resources, with special reference to the min- 
eral fuels ; the distribution and manner of occurrence of the move 
useful metals ; the economically important nonmetallic minerals ; and a 
study of the rocks and their uses as building stone, as road material, 
and as sources of lime and cement. Two hours a week. 

5. Geology. — A study of the earth's history and development, with 
especial attention to dynamical, structural, and physiographical geology. 
Three hours a week. 

6. Agricultural Chemistry. — This course includes a study of the 
origin and composition of soils; the sourse and composition of fertiliz- 

87 



College of Agriculture 

ing materials; the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen; the composition of 
insecticides and fungicides; the chemistry of milk and other dairy 
products. Prerequisite, Course I. Two hours a week. 

7. Biochemistry. — An abridged course, including a study of the 
proteins, fats, and carbohydrates, the digestive enzymes and processes, 
the tissues and secretions of the body. Class room, three hours a weeh; 
laboratory, \four hours a week. 

8. Food Analysis. — A brief introduction to quantitative analyst, 
with laboratory practice in the analysis of foods; lectures on food 
adulteration and methods for its detection. Class room, one hour a 
week; laboratory, fsix hours a week. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

51. Biochemistry. — Lectures and recitations on the composition ot 
the plant ; the source, nature, and assimilation of plant food ; the 
composition of the animal body and of food materials ; the adaptation 
of food to the animal requirements ; the chemical changes involved in 
the digestion and assimilation of foods; respiration; absorption and 
liberation of energy ; general metabolism ; the chemical processes and 
methods of investigation by which these subjects are studied. Pre- 
requisite, Chemistry 52. Five hours a week. 

52. Laboratory Biochemistry. — A study of the carbohydrates, fats, 
and protein bodies ; the digestive enzymes ; the blood muscles, bones, 
and other tissues of the body; milk, bile, and other secretions. A con- 
tinuation of the preceeding course. tFour hours a week. 

60. Agricultural Analysis. — A course in the qualitative and quanti- 
tative analysis of fodders, fertilizers, milk, butter, and other dairy pro- 
ducts. The course is designed for students desiring to take up experi- 
ment station and inspection work. Prerequisites, Chemistry 53 and 60. 
\Ten hours a week. 

Biology 

The courses in this department are described under the College of Arts 
and Sciences 



88 



Farm Management and Agricultural Engineering 

Farm Management and Agricultural Engineering 

Professor Simmons; Mr. Sink 

For undergraduates only 

2. Farm Accounting: (a) Farm Mathematics. — Instruction in this 
subject consists in the application of its principles to all kinds of farm 
problems where measurements of material, extension, capacity, etc., are 
required. 

(b) Farm Records and Accounts. — A system of records of the vari- 
ous operations of the farm, such as records of field labor, crop yields, 
milk production in the dairy, etc. ; a system of accounts showing the 
receipts and expenditures of the farm. \Four hours a week. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

71. Agricultural Engineering and Rural Architecture: (a) Agri- 
cultural Engineering. — Farm surveying and leveling; the plotting of 
farms and measurements of land; a study of drainage; estimating the 
investment and returns from a system of drainage; the making of roads; 
road material. 

(b) Rural Architecture. — The planning, designing, location, and 
construction of farm buildings, water systems, sewerage, concrete con- 
struction. Class room, two hours a week; laboratory, * three hours a 
week. 

72. Farm Mechanics and Machinery : (a) Farm Mechanics. — 
A study of the simpler laws of mechanics as applied to farm implements 
and farm machinery. 

(b) Farm Machinery. — A study of machinery used on the farm, 
farm power, etc. Demonstrations and tests are made with various 
machines and implements. Class room, two hours a week; laboratory, 
*ihree hours a week. 

73. History and Economics of Agriculture: (a) History of Argi- 
culture. — A history of agriculture from early times to the present day; 
the beginning of British agriculture, and the development of modern 
agriculture; the agriculture of the United States, its influence on social 
conditions; the importance of our leading products, and their effect on 



89 



College of Agriculture 

the world's commercial life; the agriculture of different sections; the 
development of farm machinery; progress in agricultural education. 
Lectures supplemented by illustrative material and slides. 

(b) Economics. — The factors of agricultural production, and their 
economic properties ; organization of the farm ; rent of farm land and 
the law of diminishing returns from the land; systems of distribution; 
a study of life in the rural communities; schools and other rural organi- 
zations. Class room, two hours a week ; laboratory, "{two hours a week. 

74. Farm Management. — A study of the various types of farming, 
with comparison of investment and returns from each. A study will 
be made of the conditions under which extensive, intensive, and mixed 
systems of farming prosper or fail; laying out of fields and rotations of 
crops; investigation of cost of different farming operations; management 
of men and teams ; markets and marketing. Farm surveys, with a 
detailed study of the conditions on different farms, will be made. Farm 
plans will be outlined to suit various conditions. Class room, two 
hours a week; laboratory, * three hours a week. 

Forestry 

Professor Briscoe; Assistant Professor Eaton 

1. Forest Economics. — The influence of forests on climate, on con- 
servation and distribution of water, on soils, topography, and public 
health ; relation of forestry to agriculture, mining, stock raising, manu- 
facturing, railroads, and other industries; character and extent of our 
natural forest resources ; importance of the conservation of these 
resources. Second half of semester. Two hours a week. 

2. General Forestry. — The importance and scope of the subject; 
forests as soil formers, soil fixers, and soil improvers; relation of forests 
to the health of the community; relation to state and national govern- 
ment; influence of forests on floods and drouths; geographical distribu- 
tion of forests. Two hours a week. 

3. Wood Preservation. — The structural, physical, and chemical prop- 
erties of wood, particularly with relation to durability; the seasoning ol 
wood; relation of moisture content to decay; the theory of impregnating 
wood; commercial methods of preservation; fire-proofing. One hour a 
week. 

90 



Forestry 

4. Wood Technology. — The identification and classification of the 
economic woods of the United States, based on inspection and simple 
lens laboratory work; distinguishing by means of structure, color, gloss, 
grain, texture, weight, density, odor, resonance, and taste ; abnormal 
structures and defects in the woods; occurrence of various species, and 
their uses in the arts and trades. Class room, one hour a week; labora- 
tory, 'tone hour a week. 

5. History of Forestry. — The development of forestry in European 
countries and the United States. First half of semester. Two hours a 
week. 

6. Forest Mensuration. — A continuation of Forestry 11. Two 
hours a week. 

7. Forest Protection. — Systems of fire protection practiced by the 
Federal government, state governments, and individuals or associations; 
protection against atmospheric agencies ; against insect damages ; against 
grazing and browsing animals ; against parasitic plants and weeds. One 
hour a week. 

8. Forest Mensuration Field Work. — A continuation of Course 13. 
*Six hours a week. 

9. Forest Products. — Dealing with forest products other than logs 
and lumber, such as pulp wood, veneer wood, shingles and lath, tight and 
slack cooperage, hoops and headings, excelsior, vehicle woods for spokes 
and hubs, box boards, turpentine, tannin, gums, sirups, dye woods, and 
charcoal ; methods of utilization, markets and values. Two hours a 
week. Second half of semester. 

10. Forest Mapping. — Making type and topographical maps ; using 
data of valuation survey and also traverse board; practical work in com- 
puting aneroid readings for elevation ; timber estimates for valuation 
survey. Prerequisites, Courses 6 and n. *Six hours a week. Second 
half of semester. 

11. Forest Mensuration. — Instruction in the theory of forest meas- 
urements. Lectures and recitations. Calculations and computations 
from data obtained in field work; construction of tables of growth, 
volume, and yield. Two hours a zveek. 

91 



College of Agriculture 

12. Forest Management. — Applied systems of silvicultural manage- 
ment are considered in relation to all the commercially important species 
and types of forest in the United States. Critical discussion of manage- 
ment practiced on forest tracts in various regions ; comparison with 
European systems; the work now being done in this country; practical 
problems to work out in the field. Two hours a week. 

13. Forest Mensuration Field Work. — Use of various instruments 
in forestry practice, determining the contents of standing and felled 
trees and the volume of stands; study of the use of American log scales 
and rules ; consideration of the various methods and systems of meas- 
urement used in the United States ; studies of the rate of growth of 
trees in diameter, height, and volume; growth and increment of stand. 
*Six hours a week. 

14. Forest Management Field Work. — The practical application of 
all the forestry courses in the preparation of a working plan for an 
assigned tract. *Six hours a week. 

15. Silviculture. — A study of the facts which concern forest growth 
and the relation of the tree to external influence; the forest as a whole; 
characteristics of the forest, and of the forest regions of the United 
States ; systems of forest reproduction ; methods of tending and culti- 
vating the forest. Prerequisites, Biology 61, 62, 67, and 68. Two hours 
a week. 

16. Silviculture. — A continuation of Course 15. To be taken in 
connection with Course 18 as field work. Two hours a week, 

17. Silviculture Field Work. — Special studies and practical work m 
the forest. A part of the time is devoted to the making of a forest map 
of 1000 or more acres of land in the vicinity of the University. A report 
accompanies the map describing the condition of the tract and the types 
of forest growth in detail. To be taken in connection with Course 15. 
*Six hours a week. 

18. Silviculture Field Work. — Practice in thinning and planting, 
practical tests of the germinating quality of tree seeds, and a study of 
seedlings. The student is required to prepare a map and planting plan 
of an assigned tract. To be taken in connection with Course 16. *Six 
hours a week. 



92 



Home Economics 

19. Lumbering. — The industry considered from the economic stand- 
point; an account of the methods of lumbering in the different regions 
of the United States. Required of all major students. First half of 
semester. One hour a week. 

20. Valuation and Regulation. — Economic and business principles 
underlying the management of forest products. The application of 
mensuration to the management of forests; principles and preparation 
of working plans; the normal forest; methods of obtaining sustained 
yields and continuous revenue. First half of semester. One hour a 
week. 

21. Lumbering Field Work. — In this course the student is expected 
to spend two weeks in a lumber camp and to prepare a written report on 
the operation of lumbering in that locality. Required of all major stu- 
dents. Time to be arranged. Three hours a week. 

22. Forest Policy. — National and State forest policy and administra- 
tion ; relation of corporations and private owners in regard to forest 
policies; applied forest management. Open to major students only. 
Second half of semester. One hour a week. 

23. Current Forestry Literature. — This course consists of review- 
ing periodicals and current forestry literature and in making a card 
index for reference work for the same. Elective for seniors majoring 
in Forestry. Class room, one hour a week. 

24. Forest Law. — Laws of the Federal Government and of the 
several states concerning forests and forestry. One hour a zveek. 

25. Thesis. — Two hours a week. 

26. Thesis. — Three hours a week. 

Home Economics 

Professor Freeman ; Assistant Professor Whitcomb ; Miss Beach ; 

Miss Knight 

For undergraduates only 

1, 2. Textiles and Clothing. — A study of fibers and fabrics from a 
historic, economic, and social standpoint. The laboratory work con- 
sists of the making of plain garments, involving drafting and design, 

93 

/ 



College of Agriculture 

and selection of materials. Class room, one hour a week; laboratory, 
tfour hours. 

3, 4. Design and Color. — The object is to develop the appreciation 
of harmony of line, space, and color. Class room, one hour a week; 
laboratory, "ttwo hours a week. 

5, 6. Foods. — A study of food composition, cost, and the principles 
involved in preparation. The laboratory work consists in the prepara- 
tion of the various types of foods. Prerequisites, Chemistry 1 or 3, 5, 
2 or 4, and 6. Class room, two hours a week ; laboratory, "\four hours 
a week. 

7. Dress. — Economics, hygiene, design, and color are studied in 
their relation to dress. The laboratory work consists in designing and 
drafting of pattern, selection of materials, and the making of dresses. 
Prerequisites, Courses 1, 2, 3, and 4. Class room, two hours a week; 
laboratory, "tfour hours a week. 

8. House Construction and Furnishing. — The evolution of the 
house, of house furnishings, their color, design, and cost. The labora- 
tory work consists in the planning of the house, making plans and esti- 
mates for house furnishings, and visiting of shops. Also the designing 
and making of accessories in furnishing and decorating the house. 
Prerequisites, Courses 1, 2, 3, and 4. Class room, two hours a week; 
laboratory, \four hours a week. 

9. Sanitation. — The situation of the house regarding general sur- 
roundings ; sanitary conditions in and around the house, ventilation, 
water supply, heating, and plumbing; the householder's interest in 
public sanitation and hygiene. Prerequisites, Bacteriology 1 and 3. 
Class room, three hours a week. 

10. Dietetics. — The chemical, economic, and physiological principles 
of human nutrition are studied. Prerequisites, Courses 5 and 6, and 
Biochemistry 7. Class room, three hours a week; laboratory, ^four hours 
a week. 

11. Foods. — Problems in the preparation and serving of foods. A 
continuation of Courses 5 and 6. Class room, one hour a week; labor- 
atory, jfour hours a week. 

94 



Horticulture 

12. Household Management. — A study of economic and social prin- 
ciples of the household, organization of the household, division of in- 
come, labor, household processes, and care of the household. Open to 
seniors. Class room, three hours a week; laboratory, itwo hours a 
week. 

13. Handwork. — Historical and social development of textile indus- 
tries from primitive man to modern times. Prerequisites, Courses 1 
and 2. Class room, one hour a week; laboratory, \four hours a week. 

14. Hygiene and Home Nursing. — Personal hygiene; the practical 
application of bacteriology and physiology in health and disease; the 
care of the baby; first aid to the injured. Prerequisites, Bacteriology 
1 and 3, and Biology 5. Two hours a week. 

16. Teachers' Course. — Methods of presenting the work and its 
correlation with other subjects. Practice in planning courses of study 
and equipment. Open to seniors. Three hours a week. 

17, 18. Thesis. — Different phases of home economics; individual 
problems. Open to seniors. Two to four hours a week. 

Horticulture 

Professor Brown; Associate Professor Hitchings; Mr. Lurie 

For undergraduates only 

1. Commercial Pomology. — A course in methods of picking, grading, 
packing, storing, and marketing fruit. The laboratory work of this 
course will acquaint the student with the more important varieties of 
fruit in this State. Class room, two hours a week; laboratory, Uwo 
hours a week. 

2. Practical Pomology. — A study of orchard sites and soils, methods 
of propagating, setting, cultivating, fertilizing, pruning, and spraying. 
Class room, two hours a week; laboratory, *three hours a week. 

3. Systematic Pomology. — A systematic study of the types and vari- 
eties of the leading groups of fruits, their evolution and adaptation to 

95 



College of Agriculture 

environment; also distribution of varieties in the State. Prerequisites 
Courses i and 2. Class room, two hours a week; laboratory, "ftwo hours 
a week. 

4. Vegetable Gardening. — A course in practical vegetable gardening; 
grading, marketing and storing of vegetables, including the systematic 
study of varieties and types for home and commercial use. Class room, 
two hours a week; laboratory, "ftwo hours a week. 

5. Landscape Gardening. — A study of the principles of landscape art 
and of the materials used in making landscape pictures. Special atten- 
tion is given to the improvement of the home grounds. Class room, 
iwo hours a week; laboratory, itwo hours a week. 

7. General Floriculture. — A study of the culture, propagation, man- 
agement, and care of flowers for commercial purposes. Methods of 
producing, shipping, marketing, and designing, will be considered. Class 
room, two hours a week; laboratory, "ttwo hours a week. 

8. Greenhouse Construction. — A study of the various types of 
greenhouses and the methods of construction. Estimates and plans are 
made for houses suitable for conservatories, private estates, and com- 
mercial floriculture. Cost and methods of installing heating systems, 
show rooms, and storage houses are also considered. Class room, two 
hours a week; laboratory, "ftwo hours a week. 

9. Small Fruit Culture. — A study of the bush and vine fruits, 
including strawberries ; adapted varieties ; methods of propagation, cul- 
ture, harvesting, and marketing. Class room, two hours a week; 
laboratory, Jtwo hours a week. 

10. Plant Breeding. — A course in plant breeding, as applied to vari* 
ation, selection, and hybridization, adapted to garden and fruit crops. 
Prerequisite, Biology 3. Twc hours a week. 

11. 12. Thesis. — Three hours a week. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

51. Seminar. — Preparation and discussion of papers dealing w'th 
the recent problems and experiments in Horticulture. Required of 
students taking major work in Horticulture. Prerequisites, Courses 1 
and 2. One hoar a week. 

96 



Horticulture 

52. Seminar. — A continuation of Course 51. Requirements and pre- 
requisites the same. One hour a week. 

54. Floriculture. — A course designed to give practical knowledge 
of the propagation and culture of annuals, herbaceous perennials, bulbs, 
roses, bedding plants, and other garden plants, with especial reference 
to care of public parks and private estates. Class room, two hours a 
week; laboratory, ttwo hours a week. 

56. Plant Disease Control. — A course designed to acquaint the stu- 
dent with the various kinds and types of spray machinery, and with 
the preparation and application of the various sprays used in disease 
control. Prerequisites, Courses 1 and 2. Class room, one hour a week; 
laboratory, "ftwo hours a week. 

MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

The courses in this department are described on page 205. 

PHYSICAL CULTURE AND ATHLETICS 

The courses in this department are described on page 207 



97 



College of Arts and Sciences 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCE 



FACULTY OF INSTRUCTION 

JAMES STACY STEVENS, M. S, LL. D. Professor of Physics 

Dean 
MERRTT CALDWELL FERNALD, Ph. D., LL. D. 

Emeritus Professor of Philosophy 
LUCIUS HERBERT MERRILL, Sc. D. 

Professor of Biological Chemistry 
JAMES NORRIS HART, C E., M. S., Sc. D. 

Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy 
JOHN HOMER HUDDILSTON, Ph. D. 

Professor of Greek and Classical Archeology 
RALPH KNEELAND JONES, B. S. Librarian 

JACOB BERNARD SEGALL, Ph. D. Professor of French 

GEORGE DAVIS CHASE, Ph. D. Professor of Latin 

CAROLINE COLVIN, Ph. D. Professor of History 

WALLACE CRAIG, Ph. D. Professor of Philosophy 

ROLAND PALMER GRAY, A. M. Professor of English 

RALPH HARPER McKEE, Ph. D. Professor of Chemistry 

GARRETT WILLIAM THOMPSON, Ph. D. Professor of German 
GUY ANDREW THOMPSON, Ph. D., 

Professor of English Literature 
WINDSOR PRATT DAGGETT, Ph. B. 

Professor of Public Speaking 
MINTIN ASBURY CHRYSLER, Ph. D. Professor of Biology 

GEORGE WARE STEPHENS, Ph. D. 

Professor of Economics and Sociology 
ANDREW PAUL RAGGIO, Ph. D. Professor of Spanish and Italian 
ROY FRANKLIN RICHARDSON, Ph. D. Professor of Education 
CHARLES WILSON EASLEY, Ph. D. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

9 8 



Faculty 

LEON ELMER WOODMAN, Ph. D. Associate Professor of Physics 
HARLEY RICHARD WILLARD, Ph. D. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 
ALICE MIDDLETON BORING, Ph. D. 

Associate Professor of Zoology 
JAMES McCLUER MATTHEWS, A. M. 

Associate Professor of Economics and Sociology 
DANIEL WILSON PEARCE, A. M. 

Associate Professor of Education 
ROBERT RUTHERFORD DRUMMOND, Ph. D. 

Associate Professor of German 
TRUMAN LEIGH HAMLIN, M. A. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
HARRY NEWTON CONSER, M. S., M. A. 

Assistant Professor of Botany 
LLOYD MEEKS BURGHART, M. A. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
RAYMOND HARMON ASHLEY, Ph. D. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
ALBERT GUY DURGIN, M. S. Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
LOWELL JACOB REED, M. S. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
RALPH MAYNARD HOLMES, M. A. Assistant Professor of Physics 
JOSEPH NEWELL STEPHENSON, M. S. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
BURNETT OLCOTT McANNEY, A. B, B. Lit. 

Assistant Professor of English 
WALTER EDMUND WILBUR, M. S. Instructor in Mathematics 

HERBERT SOLEY BAIN, A. B. Instructor in German 

DAVID LEE CLARK, A. M. Instructor in English 

MARTIN ANDREW NORDGAARD, M. A. Instructor in Mathematics 
RAYMOND FLOYD, B. A. Instructor in German 

NORMAN RICHARDS FRENCH, B. A. Instructor in Physics 

FRANCOIS JOSEPH KUENY, L es L. Instructor in French 

SIDNEY WINFIELD PATTERSON, B. S. 

Instructor in Biological and Agricultural Chemistry 
GLEN BLAINE RAMSEY, A. M. Instructor in Biology 

HARRY GILBERT MITCHELL, B. S., A. M. Instructor in Chemistry 
ROSCOE WOODS, B. A. Instructor in Mathematics 



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College of Arts and Sciences 

WILBERT AMIE CLEMENS, Ph. D. Instructor in Biology 

CHESTER HAMLIN GOLDSMITH, B. S. Instructor in Chemistry 

FREDERICK WILLIAM LANE, B. S. Instructor in Chemistry 

ZOETH RANSOM RIDEOUT, A. M. Instructor in English 

MYER SEGAL, A. M. Instructor in German 

THOMAS WILLIAM SHEEHAN, M. A. Instructor in English 

HILDA ESTELLE VAUGHAN, A. M. Instructor in English 

ALBERT AMES WHITMORE, B. S. Instructor in History 

GUY LINTON DIFFENBAUGH, B. A. Instructor in English 

MARGARET JUNE KELLEY, B. A. Assistant in German 

AVA HARRIET CHADBOURNE, B. A. Assistant in Education 
HENRY VIGOR CRANSTON, B. S. Assistant in Public Speaking 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The College of Arts and Sciences offers a course of liberal training 
equivalent to that of the standard New England college. It designs 
particularly to meet the needs of three classes of students : 

i. Men and women who desire to pursue a cultural college course. 

2. Men and women who desire to enter professional schools which 
require a collegiate degree. 

3. Men and women who wish to fit themselves for the profession of 
teachers in secondary schools, or for school superintendencies. 

ADMISSION 

The requirements for admission are given in full on pages 42-5S. 
They are practically the same as for other New England colleges, and 
may be met by a four years preparatory course in a good high school 
or academy. 

FRESHMAN STUDIES 

The character of the work of the first year is conditional somewhat 
upon the subjects offered for admission. 

It is recommended that all students in this college register for as 
much of the required work as practicable in their freshman year, and 
they are expected to complete the whole of this work by the end of 
their sophomore year. 



IOO 



General Information 

MAJOR SUBJECT 

During the freshman year the student does not select a major sub- 
ject and the registration is more or less prescribed. 

Beginning with the sophomore year each student must select, in some 
one department, work to be pursued three or four years, on the average 
oi five recitations a week. Any one of the following departments may 
be chosen for major work: Biology, (including Zoology, Botany, Physi- 
ology, and Entomology), Chemistry, Economics and Sociology, Educa- 
tion, English, French, German, Greek and Classical Archeology, His- 
tory, Latin, Mathematics and Astronomy, Philosophy, Physics, Spanish 
and Italian. 

The major subject must include work counting not less than six nor 
more than eight units. In the case of departments in which less work 
is offered than amounts to six units, this must be made up from such 
other related departments as the professor under whose direction the 
major subject is taken may prescribe. The remainder of the student's 
work may be selected from any department or departments of the uni- 
versity. This must be done with the approval of the head of the de- 
partment in which the student has chosen his major subject and must 
bear some useful relation to his other work. 

The head of the department in which the student has chosen his major 
subject becomes his major instructor, and during the remainder of the 
course this instructor acts as chief adviser in all matters relating to the 
curriculum, and is the representative of the student before the faculty. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

The College of Arts and Sciences has the following graduation 
requirements: (One year's work in college is regarded as the equivalent 
to two years' work in preparatory school.) 

Every candidate for the Bachelor of Arts degree is required to com- 
plete the following amount of work in college: (a) eight hours pre- 
scribed in English; (b) ten or sixteen hours elected in Group i, of 
which six or ten hours must be in foreign languages ; (c) ten hours 
elected in Group 2; (d) ten hours elected in Group 3; (e) military 
science and tactics, two years, three hours a week; (f) physical train- 
ing, one year, two hours a week. 



IOI 



College of Arts and Sciences 

A student who enters college with a minimum of four units in foreign 
languages is required to elect sixteen hours in Group I, of which at 
least ten hours shall be in foreign languages. A student who enters 
with more than the minimum of four units credit is required to elect 
at least ten hours in Group I, of which at least six hours shall be in 
foreign language. 

i. Language Group. — This is composed of courses in language and 
literature, including all the courses offered in the departments of Eng- 
lish, Public Speaking, German, French, Spanish and Italian, and such 
courses offered by the departments of Greek and Latin as deal with the 
Greek and Latin languages and literatures, or presume some knowledge 
of these languages. 

2. Science and Mathematics Group. — This is composed of the 
courses offered in mathematics and the biological and physical sciences, 
including all the courses offered by the departments of Mathematics, 
Biology, Chemistry, Biological Chemistry, and Physics. 

3. Social Science Group. — This is composed of the courses offered 
in the departments of History, Economics and Sociology, Philosophy, 
Education, and Bibliography; and the courses in History, Archeology, 
Fine Arts, and Biblical Literature offered in other departments and not 
included in the first group. 

4. Military Science and Tactics, two years, three hours a week. 

5. Physical Training, one year, three hours a week. 

GENERAL LECTURE COURSE 

A course of weekly lectures is given in the College of Arts and 
Sciences each semester. Attendance is open to all, and credit is granted 
when the course is completed. This year, the lectures will be in charge 
of the departments of German, French, and Spanish and Italian in the 
fall semester, and the department of Biology in the spring semester. 



I02 



General Information 

BACHELOR OF ARTS CURRICULA 
The work in the College of Arts and Sciences leads to the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts (B. A.). The curricula demand 25 units and art 
regularly completed in four years; but a student of exceptional prepara- 
tion and application may complete the requirements in three years. 
Students fitting themselves for professional or technical schools are 
often encouraged to do this, but prospective teachers are recommended 
to spend four years in college. 

No outline of the curricula in the College of Arts and Sciences is 
given in the catalog, but students may have such an outline presented 
to them by applying to the professor in charge of the department in 
which they are interested. Groups of studies may be made up which 
would be desirable for students intending to prepare for teaching, or 
to enter upon the study of law, medicine, or theology. 

In this college, 95 out of the 125 required hours must be made with 
a grade of C or above. 

BACHELOR OF PEDAGOGY CURRICULA 
Graduates of the Maine normal schools who have completed a course 
in a Class A high school, and who have had one year of successful 
experience in teaching, are admitted to the university as candidates for 
the degree of Bachelor of Pedagogy. Such students are required to 
complete seventy-five semester hours, of which twelve shall be in trie 
department of Education, and a sufficient number of the remaining 
hours shall be devoted to some one department to give them a satis- 
factory equipment for high school teaching. 

CURRICULUM IN JOURNALISM 

The university has recently established a curriculum in journalism, 
which extends over four years and includes the following subjects: 

Freshman year, English, French, German, or Spanish ; Science — 
Physics, or Chemistry, or Biology; English, 18th and 19th Century 
Prose; Bibliography; History and Government; Military and Physical 
Training. Sophomore year, Economics, Sociology, and Social Reforms, 
alternating with Municipal Government; History of English Litera- 
ture; English History, alternating with History, Medieval History, 
Science ; Victorian Literature ; Military and Physical Training. Junior 
year, Economics, Advanced Political Economy ; Democracy ; History 
of the United States; History of American Literature; Shakespeare, 
or History of the English Drama; Journalism; Elective, Science, or 

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College of Arts and Sciences 

Language, or Philosophy, or Art, three hours, Senior year, Economics, 
Public Finance, International Law, Business Law; Specialized Writing; 
Recent History; Literary Criticism; Journalism; Elective, Language, 
or Philosophy, or History of Education, or Art, five hours. 

Students who complete this curriculum will receive the Bachelor of 
Arts degree for major work in English. 

COURSES IN PRE-MEDICAL WORK 

The marked increase in the number of pre-medical students in at- 
tendance at the university has led the departments concerned to 
establish definite programs of work for such students. For students 
who cannot spend more than a single year in pre-medical work, a one- 
year curriculum is provided which meets the entrance requirements of 
a number of medical colleges, but prospective medical students are 
strongly recommended to spend at least two years in such work, not 
only because a better general education is thus possible, but because 
a pre-medical course of at least two years is rapidly becoming recog- 
nized as essential, as is shown by the fact that thirty-nine of the best 
medical colleges in this country require for admission two or more 
years of college work. By arrangement with certain medical colleges 
a student completing three years at this institution may enter the 
medical college, and receive his bachelor's degree here at the comple- 
tion of his first year at the medical college. 

One-Year Course 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Subject Hours Subject Hours 

General Biology 4 General Biology . . . . ; 4 

General Chemistry 4 General Chemistry 5 

General Physics 5 Laboratory Physics 2 

English 2 English 2 

German 3 German 2 

Elective 2 

Two-Year Course 

FIRST YEAR 

General Biology 4 General Biology 4 

General Chemistry 4 General Chemistry 5 

English 2 English 2 

German (or French) 5 German (or French) 5 

Military I Military I 

Physical Training h Physical Training 1 

IO4 



General Information 



SECOND YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Subject Hours 

Vertebrate Anatomy 4 

Qualitative Analysis 5 

General Physics 5 

Psychology (or Sci. Ger.) 

(2 or) 3 

Alilitary 1 



Spring Semester 
Subject Hours 

Animal Embryology 4 

Organic Chemistry 5 

Laboratory Physics 2 

Animal Histology 4 

Alilitary 1 



Three-Year Course 



General Biology 4 

General Chemistry 4 

English 2 

German (or French) 5 

Military 1 

Physical Training 



FIRST YEAR 

4 General 
General 
English 
German 
Military 



Biology 4 

Chemistry 5 

(or French) 5 



Physical Training 1 



SECOND YEAR 



Vertebrate Anatomy 4 

Qualitative Analysis 5 

General Physics 5 

English 1 

Scientific German 2 

Military I 



Animal Embryology 4 

Quantitative Ana 1 ysis 5 

Laboratory Physics 2 

English 1 

Organic Pharmacognosy 4 

Military 1 

Elective 2 



THIRD YEAR 



Animal Physiology 4 

Materia Medica 3 

Genetics 2 

English 3 

Psychology 3 

Elective 2 



Animal Histology 4 

Organic Chemistry 5 

English 3 

Social Psychology 2 

Elective 2 



ioq 



College of Arts and Sciences 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



Note: A star (*) before the time designated for a course indicates 
that three hours of actual work are required to obtain credit for one 
hour; a dagger (f) indicates that two hours are required to obtain 
this credit; a double dagger ($) indicates that two and one-half hours 
are required. 

Courses designated by an odd number are given in the fall semester; 
those designated by an even number, in the the spring semester. 

ART 

Professor Huddilston 

Courses extending thru four semesters present an opportunity for 
the student to cover the entire field of ancient and medieval and 
modern art history in its various bearings on the history of Europe 
down to the close of the 18th century, and when taken in succession all 
but the first course may be counted toward an advanced degree. 

Oriental, Greek, and Roman art will be given in a three hour course 
occupying one year and medieval and modern art will follow this for 
two semesters for the same number of periods. 

While it is not absolutely essential that a student should have taken 
Courses I and 56 in order to be admitted to 57 and 58, it is highly 
desirable that a sequence should be observed and that the historical 
evolution of the great art epochs should be approached in such a 
manner as to contribute the largest educational values. 

1. Art. — The history of art in ancient Egypt and western Asia, with 
special reference to the buildings of the Egyptians as exhibiting the 
best index to the history of that remarkable race. This chapter will be 

106 



Art 

a foreword to the beginning of art in southeastern Europe; the Cretan 
and Mycenaean periods preceding the early Greek period. The history 
ot Greek architecture and sculpture will be given down to the begin- 
ning of Athenian supremacy. The extant monuments will be studied 
in photographs and with the aid of the stereopticon. Lectures, note- 
books, text-books, and discussions. Three hours a week. Given in 
1914-15 and alternate years. 

3. General Art History. — From the Greek age down to the time 
of the French Revolution. Main emphasis will be laid on the 
architecture and sculpture of the ancients and the painting of 
Renaissance and later times. This course is intended for a rapid sur- 
vey of the subject and is presented with the idea of accommodating 
such students as can not afford the time required by the twelve semes- 
ter hours involved in the other courses described in this department. 
Instruction will be given by lectures, with a text-book for occasional 
quiz. Two hours a week. 

56. Art. — Greek and Roman art in their broad relations to the life 
of classical times; the influence of art as a dominant force in Greece 
and the effects of Greek culture upon Rome; the passing of Greek art 
to Latin soil ; the notable national monuments of Rome. The existing 
remains in the European museums as well as the monuments still in 
siiu in Italy, Sicily, Greece, and Asia Minor will be gone over with the 
photographs. 

Each student will be expected to acquire some ability in estimating 
the styles of the various epochs. Lectures. Three hours a week. Given 
in 1914-15 and alternate years. 

57. Medieval Art. — The history of art as influenced and modified by 
Christianity; Romanesque and Gothic in the West and North; the early 
centuries of painting in Italy and the influence of the fine arts in the 
14th and 15th centuries, particularly in Florence, Siena, Ravenna, 
Venice, and Rome; the spirit of the Renaissance in Italy, France and 
Germany under the domination of Italy. Lectures, study of photo- 
graphs, and investigation of various topics. Three hours a week. 
Given in 1915-16 and alternate years. 

58. Modern Art. — Art in the north of Europe and in Spain, particu- 
larly the schools of painting and palace architecture in France. The 

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College of Arts and Sciences 

age of Louis XIV reflected at Versailles and in the Louvre ; the new 
importance of artists as international factors at Madrid, Paris, and 
London ; social evolution and contemporary history reflected in the 
successive schools of artists with the gradual ascendency of France 
until the time of the French Revolution. Lectures ; study of pictures ; 
special subjects for individual investigation. Three hours a week. 
Given in 1915-16 and alternate years. 

ASTRONOMY 

Professor Hart; Assistant Professor Reed; Mr. Wilbur 
10. Descriptive Astronomy. — An elementary course. The text-book 
is supplemented by informal lectures, illustrated by lantern slides, 
drawings of celestial objects, and work in the observatory. Open to 
all students. Three hours a week. 

15, 16. General Astronomy. — Designed for general culture and for 
students in mathematics and physics. Recitations, lectures, solutions of 
problems, observations with instruments in the observatory. Open to 
sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have had Mathematics I. Three 
hours a week. Given in 1915-16 and alternate years. 

57. Practical Astronomy. — A course arranged to meet the needs cf 
engineering students, and consisting mainly of problems in the conver- 
sion of time, the determination of terrestial latitudes, and the estab- 
lishment of meridian lines. The data for these problems are taken 
largely from the students' own observations, and the course is intended 
to emphasize the necessity of careful work in the field, as well as accu- 
rate and well arranged computations. The instruments employed are 
the sextant, artificial horizon, portable chronometer, theodolite, vertical 
circle, astronomical transit, and zenith telescope. Open to students 
who have taken Mathematics 1, 3, 9, and Astronomy 10. Two hours ( / 
recitations or lectures and two hours of observatory work a week. 

59, 60. Practical Astronomy. — The theory and use of the sextant, 
universal instrument, zenith telescope, transit, and equatorial. Open 1o 
students who have taken Mathematics 6, 7, 8, and Astronomy 10, and, 
preferably, 57. Three hours a week. Given in 1916-17 and alternate 
years. 

62. History of Astronomy. — Lectures and recitations. Two hours 
a week. Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 

T08 



Bibliography 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Professor Jones 

i. Bibliography. — Origin of the alphabet; development of writing; 
inscriptions; manuscripts; invention of printing; early printed books; 
modern bookmaking; bookbinding and the care of books; library pro- 
cesses and aids ; public documents ; periodicals ; libraries, ancient and 
modern. A lecture course, with collateral reading and reference work. 
One hour a week. 

Three lectures are given on The Library and its Uses ; Classification 
and the Catalog; and Reference Books and their Use. Required of all 
freshmen. 

BIOLOGY 

Professor Chrysler; Associate Professor Boring; Assistant Pro- 
fessor Conser; Mr. Ramsey; Doctor Clemens; Mr. Lane 

General Biology. — Course i, General Zoology, together with course 
2, General Botany, comprise a year's work in General Biology. After 
completing courses i and 2 a student may specialize on either the 
botanical or the zoological side of Biology. The science requirement 
in the College of Arts and Sciences may be met by taking Courses 1, 2, 
and 7. 

1. General Zoology. — The fundamental principles of animal life, 
illustrated by examples from the principal groups, and including some 
work on the anatomy and physiology of higher animals. Required of 
students taking the curricula in Agriculture and Forestry and Pre-medi- 
cal work. Class-room, two hours a week; laboratory, if our hours a 
week. 

2. General Botany. — The fundamental principles of plant life, 
illustrated by examples from the various groups, but with special at- 
tention to the seed-plants. Required of students taking the curricula 
in Agriculture, Forestry and Home Economics, and Pre-medical work. 
Prerequisite, Course 1. Class-room, two hours a week; laboratory, 
if our hours a week. 



109 



College of Arts and Sciences 

7. Principles of Breeding, or Genetics. — A general treatment of 
the facts that form the basis of our knowledge of inheritance. Pre- 
requisite, Courses 1 and 2. Two hours a week. 

8. Entomology. — A study of the structure, life-histories, and classi- 
fication of insects, illustrated by common farm and forest species; the 
special insect pests of farm, garden, orchard, and forest, and of domes- 
tic animals ; methods of control. Some work on animal parasites other 
than insects is included. Prerequisite, Courses 1 and 2. Class-room, 
tzvo hours a week; laboratory, t/owr hours a week. 

9. Plant Taxonomy and Histology. 10. Plant Physiology and 
Pathology. — A combined course for one year for students in Agricul- 
ture, consisting of: practice in the identification of the higher plants; 
microscopic work on the cell, tissues, and organs of the higher plants; 
a study of the functions of plants, including nutrition, growth and 
response; a study of the diseases of plants, especially those caused by 
fungi. Prerequisite, Courses 1 and 2. Class-room, two hours a ween; 
laboratory, tsix hours a week. 

Note. Pharmaceutical botany is given in Courses 14 and 15, which 
are designed to meet the needs of students in Pharmacy, according 10 
the syllabus of the National Committee. 

14. Elementary Botany. — The fundamentals of the subject. Re- 
quired of Two Year Pharmacy students. Class-room, one hour a week; 
laboratory, if our hours a week. 

15. Pharmaceutical Histology. — The technique of preparation and 
study of the tissues of the higher plants. Prerequisite, Course 14. 
Class-room, one hour a week; laboratory, \four hours a week. 

17. Wood Identification. — The identification of the various com- 
mercial woods by means of the unaided eye and the microscope. Open 
to students in Chemical Engineering, and to others by permission. 
\jour hours a week (counts one unit). Second half of fall semester. 

51. Vertebrate Anatomy. — A comparative study of the organ sys- 
tems of vertebrates, with the dissection of the dogfish and cat. Pre- 
requisite, Courses 1 and 2. Class-room, two hours a week; laboratory, 
Iffour hours a week. 



IIO 



Biology 



52. Animal Embryology. — A study of the fundamental principles 
ci development, and the formation of organ systems and tissues in 
vertebrates. Laboratory work on fish, frog and chick. Prerequisite, 
Course 51. Class-room, two hours a week; laboratory, if our hours a 
week. 

53. Advanced Animal Physiology. — A study of the activities of 
cells and organ systems, with experimental work on the muscles, nerves, 
circulation, etc., in frog and man. Prerequisite, Course 51. Class-room, 
two hours a week; laboratory, if our hours a week. 

54. Animal Histology. — A study of the structure of protoplasm, 
cells, and tissues. Practice in microscopical technique. Prerequisite, 
Course 51. Class-room, two hours a week; laboratory, if our hours a 
week. 

61. Plant Histology. — The microscopic structure of the higher 
plants : the cell ; the various tissues ; the root, stem, leaf, and spore- 
bearing organs ; the adaptations of plants to external conditions, con- 
sidered from the standpoint of structure; killing, sectioning, staining, 
and mounting of plant tissues. Prerequisite, Courses 1 and 2. Class- 
room, two hours a week; laboratory, if our hours a week. 

62. Plant Physiology. — The plant is considered from the stand- 
points of its activities ; absorption and transport of raw material ; manu- 
facture, transport, and storage of food; growth; movement in response 
to stimuli. Prerequisite, Course 61. Class-room, two hours a week; 
laboratory, if our hours a week. 

63. Plant Taxonomy and Morphology. — The identification of seed- 
plants by the use of a manual ; the structure and relationships of vas- 
cular plants from the evolutionary standpoint. Prerequisite, Course 61. 
Class-room, field and laboratory work; time to be arranged, giving 
four units. 

64. Plant Ecology. — Presents briefly two aspects of the subject: 
(1) Physiographic ecology studied in the field as far as the season 
permits ; (2) Structural ecology, viz., the histological features char- 



III 



College of Arts and Sciences 

acteristic of plants growing in extreme habitats, and of those having 
special modes of nutrition. Prerequisite, Course 9 or 61. Class-room, 
one hour a week; laboratory, \four hours a week. Given in 1915-16 and 
alternate years. 

65. Plant Pathology. — The diseases of plants, especially those 
caused by fungi; destruction of timber by fungi; methods of combat- 
ing plant diseases. Prerequisite, Course 61. Class-room, two hours 
a week; laboratory, ftwo hours a week. Given in 1916-17 and alter- 
nate years. 

67, 68. Forest Botany. — A systematic study of the trees of North 
America. The course includes dendrology and forest ecology. Pre- 
requisite, Courses 1 and 2. Class-room, two hours a week; field or 
laboratory, "\four hours a week. 

71, 72. Seminar. — Preparation and discussion of papers dealing 
with recent advances in zoology and botany. Open to seniors and 
graduate students. One hour a week. 

73, 74. Thesis. — Students in the College of Agriculture specializing 
in biology may prepare a thesis on some subject approved by the head 
of the department. Time varies. 

75, 76. Advanced Zoology. — This course offers an opportunity for 
special zoological work along lines suited to the future plans of the 
student. It may consist of field work, laboratory work, or reading, or a 
combination of all three. In general each student is given a problem 
for investigation and encouraged to devise methods for its solution. 
The time varies and the work may be continued a number of semesters. 

77, 78. Advanced Botany. — This course offers an opportunity for 
special work in botany along the lines best suited to the future plans of 
the student. It may consist of laboratory work, field work, or reading, 
or a combination of all three. Courses which have recently been given 
under this caption include: morphology of pteridophytes ; structure 
and technology of woods; structural and physiographic ecology; ad- 
vanced plant physiology; special problems assigned to individuals. The 
time varies and the work may be continued a number of semesters. 



112 



Economics and Sociology 

ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY 

Professor Stephens; Associate Professor Matthews 

For undergraduates only 

ia. Elements of Economics. — An introductory course dealing with 
the general principles and problems of modern economic activity, pro- 
duction, distribution, and consumption ; value, commerce, labor prob- 
lems, and various other topics in this field of study. Three hours a 
week. 

ib. Elements of Economics. — In general, similar to ia, but abbre- 
viated and modified to meet the needs of technical and agricultural 
students. Two hours a week. 

2a. Money and Banking. — A course introductory to the study of 
money, banking, and finance. The history of currency and banking in 
the United States and the leading countries of the world. Three 
hours a week. 

2b. Money and Banking. — Essentially similar to 2a, but planned 
especially for students in the Colleges of Technology and Agriculture. 
Two hours a week. 

3. Elements of Politics. — An introductory course dealing with the 
basic principles of government, nature of the state, sovereignty, liberty, 
governmental structures, political parties. Two hours a week. 

6. Business Law. — The legal principles of modern business; con- 
tracts, agency, corporations, partnerships, bailments, guaranty, insur- 
ance. This course is intended primarily for seniors. Three hours a 
week. 

7, 8. Elementary American Government. — Open to freshmen only, 
in connection with History 7 and 8. Two hours a week. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

52. Public Finance. — Various systems for the collection of public 
revenue in America and Europe; governmental budgets; taxation,— 
incidence and shifting, general property, customs and excises, mort- 

113 



College of Arts and Sciences 

gage, insurance, income, inheritance, corporation, single tax. Three 
hours a week. 

55. General Sociology.— The principles underlying normal social 
processes and relations; societal development and selection. Three 
hours a week. 

56. Social Pathology. — The dependent, defective, and delinquent 
classes ; their causes, magnitude, methods of prevention, and ameliora- 
tion. Three hours a week. 

60. Public Utilities. — Municipal utilities in the United States and 
Europe ; their economic, social, and legal principles and problems ; 
regulation by commission ; public and private ownership. Two hours 
a week. Given in 1915-16 and alternate years. 

63. Government of Europe. — A comparative study of the modern 
government of the principal counties of Europe; party development 
and current problems national and local. Three hours a week. Given 
in 1915-16 and alternate years. 

65. Socialism and Social Reform. — Socialism as a movement, a 
philosophy, and a program ; the various schools of socialistic thought ; 
anarchism; syndicalism; social reform. Two hours a week. Given in 
1916-17 and alternate years. 

66. Municipal Government. — The forms of government and the 
principal problems of American and European cities; recent movements 
for social and civic betterment. Two hours a week. Given in 1915-16 
and alternate years. 

68. American Government. — The principles and interpretation oi 
the American federal, state, and local governments; the study of 
American problems and the growth of political parties. Three hours 
a week. Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 

71. Labor Problems.— The evolution of organized labor; present- 
day industrial problems of trade unions, woman and child labor, im- 
migration, employers' associations, agencies of industrial peace. Three 
hours a week. Given in 1915-16 and alternate years. 



114 



Economics and Sociology 

74. Transportation. — The historical development of transportation 
in the United States ; railway organization, financing, rate-makin:>- ; 
public regulation and ownership of railroads in leading European 
countries ; federal and state legislation and regulation. Three hours 
a week. Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 

75. Business Organization. — The origin and development of the 
corporation ; significance of large-scale enterprize ; the economic and 
legal aspects of business combinations; corporation finance; govern- 
mental regulation. Three hours a week. Given in 1916-17 and alter- 
nate years. 

76. Business Management. — The methods of business; system; 
efficiency; cost accounting; principles of buying and selling. Three 
hours a week. Given in 191 5-16 and alternate years. 

79. International Law. — The nature, sources, evolution, and re- 
cent modification of international law; significance of the Great War; 
the position and influence of the United States. Three hours a week. 
Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 

82. Rural Sociology. — The social factors affecting country life; 
the economics of farming ; rural co-operative organizations ; the 
movement for the improvement of rural life. Two hours a week. 
Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 

85. American Commerce. — American commercial relations with for- 
eign countries ; the development of foreign trade ; the problems and 
methods of international business. Spanish America is treated the 
first half-year. Two hours a week. Given in 191 5-16 and alternate 
years. 

86. American Commerce. — A continuation of Course 85, with em- 
phasis upon American trade relations with the countries of Europe 
and the Far East. Two hours a week. Given in 1915-16 and alternate 
years. 

89. American Diplomacy. — A review of a century of American 
diplomatic relations ; famous treaties and prominent men and adminis- 
trations connected with such negotiations. Pan-American diplomacj 
constitutes the subject of study the first semester. Two hours a week. 
Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 

"5 



College of Arts and Sciences 

90. American Diplomacy. — A continuation of Course 89, chief at- 
tention being given to diplomatic relations with the countries of 
Europe and the Orient. Two hours a week. Given in 1916-17 and 
alternate years. 

93. The Family. — An historical consideration of the origin and 
development of the family; the legal and economic relations of its 
members ; its significance as an institution ; its pathological manifesta- 
tions. Two hours a week. Given in 1915-16 and alternate years. 

Primarily for graduates 

102. Economic Theory. — A critical study of modern theories of 
wealth and its distribution ; the contributions to theory of the classical, 
historical, and Austrian schools; current writers; Two hours a week. 

107, 108. Seminar in American Government. — Given at the option 
of the instructor to a limited number of students who have shown 
special ability in the study of American government. Two hours a 
week. 

109, no. Seminar in Economics. Extended original investigation 
upon some specific topic to be selected by students properly qualified 
to engage in economic research. Two hours a week. 

EDUCATION 

Professor Richardson ; Associate Professor Pearce; Miss 
Chadbourne 

For undergraduates and graduates 

51. History and Principles of Education. — The principles under- 
lying modern educational theory and practice; the historical develop- 
ment of our present school system and school curriculum; the profes- 
sional training of the teacher; the biological bases of education; a 
survey of the history of education from the Athenians to the present 
time. Three hours a week. 

52. History and Principles of Education. — A continuation of 
Course 51. A study of various phases of educational theory and 

Il6 



Education 

practice ; their historical development, the principles underlying them, 
and their application to present conditions. The school as a social 
institution; public support and control of education; interest; corre- 
lation ; formal discipline. An intensive study by each student of 
some topic more or less directly connected with his major work. 
Recitations, readings, reports, and discussions. Three hours a week. 

54. Contemporary Movements in Education. — A critical examina- 
tion of contemporary principles and movements influencing present 
educational thought and practice based chiefly on the study of the 
doctrines of Parker, Harris, Hall, Montessori, and Dewey. Three 
hours a week. 

55. Social Education. — The purpose of this course is to formulate 
the social concept of education; to make a tentative statement of the 
social principles underlying the educational aim and process. The vari- 
ous educational agencies — school, home, community, church, and state — 
will be discussed from the sociological viewpoint. Special emphasis 
is placed on present social demands. Three hours a week. Given in 
1915-16 and alternate years. 

61. Administration and Supervision of Education. — The organi- 
zation and administration of school systems; a study of theoretical and 
practical aspects ; relation of national government to education ; modes 
of organization of state, city, and rural educational agencies; forms of 
educational control; comparative study of organization and adminis- 
tration of education in Canada and in one European country; school 
laws ; financial support of schools ; duties and powers of school boards, 
superintendent, and teachers ; school buildings and grounds ; heating, 
lighting, and ventilation ; scientific management of schools. Three 
periods a week. 

62. Administration and Supervision of Education. — A continua- 
tion of Course 61. The classification, grading, promotion, and retarda- 
tion of pupils ; the training, certification, appointment, tenure, and 
supervision of teachers; general aspects of the course of study; men- 
tal and physical tests of pupils ; school records and accounts. Thret 
hours a week. 



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College of Arts and Sciences 

72. The Pedagogy and Psychology of High School Subjects. — A 
study of the principles underlying the methods of instruction of the 
various high school subjects, including the place and function of these 
subjects in high school and special discussion of mental processes in- 
volved in their study. Three hours a week. 

73. Secondary Education. — The development of our present sys- 
tem of secondary schools; the function of the secondary school, its 
relation to the elementary school, to the college, and to the social 
state; the adolescent; the course of study; the equipment; secondary 
school activities ; organization and management of the secondary school. 
Three hours a week. 

74. Mlthods in Teaching Agriculture. — The present status of agri- 
cultural instruction in secondary schools, the application of principles 
of pedagogy to the teaching of agriculture and the organization of agri- 
cultural materials into a course. Required of all taking the practice 
course in the teaching of agriculture. Two hours a week. 

75. 76. Practice Teaching. — Class teaching of regular grammar 
school and high school studies in schools of Orono and Old Town. 
There are special conferences with instructors in charge of these 
courses. Other courses in practice teaching may also be arranged with 
credit in proportion to time and character of work. Prerequisites, one 
semester's work in education. Five periods a week; four hours credit. 
Practice teaching in agriculture in connection with School Course in 
Agriculture. Three periods a week; two hours credit. 

77, 78. Class Management. — General conduct of classes; art of 
questioning; oral and written tests; systems of marking; observation 
of classes. Required of all taking regular practice course. One hour 
a week. 

81. Vocational Education. — The history and status of vocational 
education in the United States and Europe ; pertinent lessons to be 
learned from foreign systems; attitude of organized labor; attitude 01 
employers of labor; relation to manual training; legislation; experi- 
ment of private philanthropic institutions, industrial corporations, and 
public schools; articulation with present school system; placement; 



n8 



Education 

employment ; supervision ; vocational analysis ; cumulative school 
records ; vocational guidance surveys and vocational bureaus. Three 
hours a week. Not given in 1915-16. 

Primarily for graduates 

101, 102. Seminar in Education. — Current methods in measuring th<. 
products of education, including standard tests in writing, reading, 
spelling, drawing, and English. Experiments in the learning process 
of these subjects will be studied. Each student will be required to. 
work out some one phase of the subject by the application of the 
measurements to the schools in Orono or other towns. This course is 
recommended for superintendents and principals. Two hours a week. 

Summer Term 

Associate Professor Pearce 

Three of the following courses will be given. The choice of courses 
will be determined largely by the number desiring the work. Advance 
registration will be especially considered. 

61s. School Problems. — This course is especially designed for super- 
intendents, principals, and others who wish to make a study of prob- 
lems of school organization, administration and supervision. The topics 
and details dealt with will be determined by the needs of those taking 
the course. The following topics are suggested : classification, promo- 
tion, retardation, acceleration, and elimination of pupils; the course of 
study; school programs; consolidation; the training, certification, ap- 
pointment, promotion, tenure and supervision of teachers ; and the 
widening scope of public education. Brief reports on assigned reading- 
will be required weekly. 

77s. Classroom Management and School Hygiene. — The purpose 
of this course is to consider the fundamentals of class instruction and 
the hygiene of the school and the teaching process. The following are 
some of the points considered : routine and habit ; the daily program ; 
order and discipline ; penalties ; problem of attention ; testing results ; 
preserving hygienic conditions in the classroom ; ventilation ; contagious 
diseases ; eye, ear and mouth defects ; fatigue and overpressure ; home 
study; seating of pupils; recesses; etc. Some attention will be given 
to methods of teaching personal and social hygiene. 



119 



College of Arts and Sciences 

51s. Educational Classics. — This course embraces the study of rep- 
resentative pedagogical writings of modern times. Selections will be 
made from the following : Rosseau's Emile, Pestalozzi's Leonard and 
Gertrude, Herbart's Outlines of Educational Doctrine, Froebel's The 
Education of Man and Dewey's (1) The School and Society, (2) The 
Child and the Curriculum, (3) Interest as Related to Will. The aim 
is to ascertain (1) their inner consistency, (2) their relation to the 
civilization of their times, (3) the elements which they contribute to 
sound educational philosophy. 

55s. The Principles of Education. — The design of this course is to 
set forth (1) the meaning and aims of education as related to the 
individual and society; (2) the relative educational value of studies 
and their organization into the curriculum, as indicated by the recapitu- 
lation, culture epoch, formal discipline and other theories; and (3) the 
methods of teaching as determined by the mental process involved, 
particularly, instinct, habit, attention, interest, apperception, induction 
and deduction. 

Graduate Courses. — One or more courses will be offered each sum- 
mer for those who wish to undertake work toward an advanced degree. 
For the summer of 1915, Courses 51s, 55s, and 77s are the specific ones 
offered, but it may be possible to arrange other courses for any who 
have had adequate preparation and who wish to pursue a special line 
of work. 

In addition to the regular courses, opportunity will be given for the 
investigation of special problems in education. Teachers, whether work- 
ing for credit or not, will be given the advice and help necessary for 
such investigation. If teachers who wish to do work of this kind 
will consult with the instructor some weeks in advance, arrangements 
may be made by which special material for the study may be collected. 

Credit towards Professional Certificates. — By arrangement with the 
State Department of Education, certain courses given in the Summer 
Term may be counted toward fulfilling the requirements of the profes- 
sional secondary certificate. A rotation of courses will be arranged 
from year to year such that it will enable teachers to secure this certifi- 
cate by attendance at several sessions of the Summer Term. Courses 
51 s, 55s, and 77s, are the courses for which such credit will be given. 



I20 



English 

ENGLISH 

Professor Gray; Professor G. A. Thompson; Assistant Professor 
McAnney; Mr. Clark; Mr. Rideout; Miss Vaughan ; Mr. Shee- 
han ; Mr. Diffenbaugh 

Eight hours in English are required for the Bachelor of Arts, and 
ten hours (men) or thirteen (women) for the Bachelor of Science 
degrees. These credits are obtained somewhat differently in the several 
colleges: (i) in the College of Arts and Sciences by taking, during 
the freshman year, Courses 5, 6 and in Public Speaking Courses 1, 2; 
and during ithe sophomore year, Courses 9, 10, or 11, 12, or 27, 28, or 
29, 30, or 37, 38; (2) in the College of Agriculture by taking, in the 
freshman year, Courses 7, 8; in the sophomore year, Courses 3, 4 in 
Public Speaking; in the junior year, Courses 17 and 18; women in 
Home Economics, in the freshman year, Courses 5, 6; and during the 
sophomore year, Courses 29, 30; and during the senior year, Course 45; 
(3) in the College of Technology by taking Courses 7, 8; and in the 
sophomore year, Courses 3, 4 in Public Speaking; and in the senior 
year Course 15. 

English 5, 6 or 7, 8 are prerequisite, in all colleges, for courses of the 
sophomore year. The required courses of the freshman and sophomore 
years may not be postponed until the junior or senior year, without 
permission of the head of the department. 

Elective courses in this department should be taken, so far as prac- 
ticable, in the following order : 

First year : Courses 29, 30. 

Second year: Courses 29, 30, 27, 28, perhaps 51 and 52, 35, 36, 39, 40, 
3i. 

Third year: Courses ^3, 54, 3 1 and 32, 41 and 42, 55 and 56, 13, 35, 36, 
37 and 38, 19 and 20, 33 and 34, 39, 40, 21, 61, 62, 23, 24. 

Fourth year : Courses 31 and 32, 55 and 56, 13, 53 and 54, 21, 61, 62, 
19 and 20, perhaps 59, 60, 66, 67, 68, 25, 26. 

Students are expected to consult the head of the department, if they 
find it necessary to make a change. 

For undergraduates only 

5. English Composition and Rhetoric. — The object of this course 
is to give training in writing correct and clear English, with attention 
also to oral expression. The theoretical work consists of the study of 
the fundamental principles of good usage in English writing; and of 

121 



College of Arts and Sciences 

the expository form of composition, with some attention to the narra- 
tive and descriptive forms. In illustration of the theory many selections 
from literature are studied. Weekly themes and monthly essays, wltii 
conferences. This course is prescribed for freshmen in the College of 
Arts and Sciences. Two hours a week. 

6. English Composition and Rhetoric. — The object of this course 
is the same as in Course 3. The theoretical work consists of the more 
elementary principles of argumentation ; practice in making outlines and 
briefs ; weekly ithemes and monthly essays. This course is prescribed 
for freshmen in the College of Arts and Sciences. Two hours a week.. 

7. English Composition. — The theory and practice of composition 
adapted to the needs of technical students. The writing is mainly ex- 
pository; weekly themes and monthly essays, with conferences. This 
course is prescribed for freshmen in the Colleges of Technology and 
Agriculture. Three hours a week in the College of Technology and 
two hours a week in the College of Agriculture. 

8. English Composition. — The theory and practice of composition 
adapted to the needs of technical students. The writing is mainly argu- 
mentative, with attention to the less literary aspects of narrative and 
descriptive writing. Weekly themes and monthly briefs and essays, with 
conferences. This course is prescribed for freshmen in the Colleges ox 
Technology and Agriculture. Three hours a week in the College of 
Technology and two hours a week in the College of Agriculture. 

9. 10. Expository Composition. — A detailed and fairly complete study 
of the theory of exposition, with attention to prose style. Monthly 
essays and conferences. Two hours a week. Prerequisites, Courses 

5, 6 or 7, 8. 

11, 12. Argumentative Composition. — An advanced course in the 
theory and practice of argumentation. Monthly essays and conferences. 
Two hours a week. Prerequisites, Courses 5, 6 or 7, 8. 

13. Advanced Composition. — Informal lectures on various literary 
forms and styles, with a large amount of writing. The object of the 
course is to cultivate clearness, facility, and individuality of style, and 



122 



English 

to train students to perceive and appreciate these qualities in the best 
books. Specialized writing, as dramatic criticism, for students in jour- 
nalism. 

Students looking forward to newspaper or magazine work, to a liter- 
ary career, or to teaching, will find this course especially helpful. 

Prerequisites: Courses 5, 6, 9, 10, or n, 12, 29, 30. Two hours a week. 

15. Business English. — Correspondence, mechanical details, reports, 
preparation of manuscript for theses, and for technical journals. Pre- 
scribed for seniors in the College of Technology. Two hours a week. 
Fall semester. 

17. Composition. — This course gives practice in technical journalism 
and news writing, in making reports and summaries of investigation, 
and in the preparation of theses. Open only to juniors and seniors in 
the College of Agriculture. Two hours a week. 

18. Literary Types. — Great books, typical of the several forms of 
literature, will be read. An endeavor will be made to cultivate an appre- 
ciation of the best, both in prose and poetry, and to acquire critical 
knowledge of what constitutes a great drama, a great epic, a great lyric, 
a great novel, etc. Open only to juniors and seniors in the College of 
Agriculture. Two hours a week. 

23, 24. Journalism. — This course gives training and practice in the 
fundamentals of newspaper writing: such as, observation or the seeing 
stories that have unique interest, "turning in tips," developing "news," 
"feature," and "human interest" stories, writing in journalistic style. A 
comparative study is made of the leading newspapers. Three hours a 
week. 

25, 26. Journalism. — Practical newspaper work and technic. Three 
hours a week. Prerequisite, Courses 23, 24. 

27, 28. Practical Journalism. — This course consists in practical 
work in connection with student publications. Two hours a week. 

29. History of English Literature. An outline course, extending 
to the close of the sixteenth century, including extensive reading in the 
English classics. Lectures, assigned reading, and reports. This course 



T23 



College of Arts and Sciences 

is introductory to all other courses in English literature, and should be 
taken in the sophomore year. 

Those who can elect only one course in English will probably find this 
course best suited to their needs. Three hours a week. 

30. History of English Literature. — A continuation of Course 29, 
covering the periods from the seventeenth century to the present day. 
Three hours a week 

31. English Prose in the Eighteenth Century. — Among the writ- 
ings studied are selections from Addison, Swift, Johnson, Goldsmith, 
and Burke. Two hours a week. 

32. English Prose in the Nineteenth Century. — Among the writ- 
ings studied are selections from Macaulay, Carlyle, Ruskin, Newman, 
Matthew Arnold, and Stevenson. Two hours a week. 

33. Shakespeare and the English Drama. — A lecture course giving 
a brief historical survey of the origin and development of the English 
drama to the time of Shakespeare, with assigned reading in the old 
dramatists. Introductory lectures on the life and art of Shakespeare, 
with a study of an early and a late comedy, and an early and a late trag- 
edy. Three hours a week. Given in 191 5-16 and alternate years. 

34. Shakespeare. — A detailed study of three or four great tragedies 
of Shakespeare. Three hours a week. Given in 191 5-16 and alternate 
years. 

35. Elizabethan Poetry.— A study of Elizabethan non-dramatic 
poetry, showing its rise and development, its dominant forms and char- 
acteristics, and its relations to the life and thought of the age. Two 
hours a week. Given in 191 5-16 and alternate years. 

36. Elizabethan Prose and Poetry. — The study of Elizabethan 
poetry will be completed, and the large part of the semester given to 
the study of the prose of the period. Two hours a week. Given in 
1915-16 and alternate years. 

37. 38. Victorian Poets.— Tennyson, Browning, Rossetti, and Arnold. 
A study of selected poems, with additional assigned reading in the poets. 

124 



English 

Special attention is given to the art of Tennyson and Browning. Two 
hours a week. 

39. History of English Literature. — A lecture course giving a brief 
survey of the development of English literature, extending to the close 
of the sixteenth century. Assigned reading and reports. Two hours a 
week. Open to technical students only. 

40. History of English Literature. — This course continues the work 
of 39, covering ithe periods from the seventeenth century to the present 
time. Two hours a week. Open to technical students only. 

41. English Romantic Poets. — A general view of the English 
Romantic Movement, with some attention to the characteristics of the 
poetry that preceded this movement; a study of selected poems from the 
writings of Thompson, Collins, Gray, Cowper, and Burns. Two hours a 
zveek. Given in 1915-16 and alternate years. 

42. English Romantic Poets. — A continuation of Course 41. Study 
of selected poems from the writings of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Scott, 
Byron, Shelley, and Keats. Two hours a week. Given in 1916-17 and 
alternate years. 

43. 44. American Literature. — A lecture course giving an historical 
outline, with assigned reading. Two hours a week. Prerequisites, 
Courses 29 and 30. 

45. Composition and Literature. — (a) Practice in forms of writing 
especially suited to the needs of women, as the preparation of a cluD 
paper, etc. (b) A study of the best literature for childhood. Required 
of seniors in Home Economics and elective for other senior women. 
Three hours a week. 

. For graduates and undergraduates 

51. Old English (Anglo-Saxon).— A first course, designed to intro- 
duce the student of English to the historical study of the language, and 
to the beginnings of English prose and poetry. Elements of Old English 
grammar; reading of easy prose and poetry. Constant reference is made 
to the relation of old English to modern English and modern German. 



125 



College of Arts and Sciences 

Lectures on the literature of the period 700-1000. This course is advised 
for those intending to teach English, and for all who wish a thoro 
knowledge of the language and literature. Three hours a week. Given 
in 1915-16 and alternate years. 

52. Beowulf. — This, the oldest English epic, is read with attention to 
text, meter, literary, and archeological interest. Three hours a weet. 
Prerequisite, Course 51. 

53. Middle English Literature. — Elements of the grammar of Mid- 
dle English ; reading of the texts in Emerson's Middle English Reader. 
Langland's Piers Plowman is read with attention to text, meter, and 
literary interests. Three hours a week. Prerequisite, Course 51. Given 
in 1916-17 and alternate years. 

54. Chaucer. — All of the Canterbury Tales and some of the Minor 
Poems are read with attention to language, meter, historical and liter- 
ary interests. Three hours a week. Given in 1916-17 and alternate 
years. 

55. 56. The Novel. — A study of :the development and technique of ihe 
English novel. At least eight of the greatest English and American 
novels will be read. Two hours a week. 

57. Cynewulf. — Reading of The Christ and The Elene ; and possi- 
bly some of the poems attributed to Cynewulf, as the Phenix, and the 
Juliana, with attention to text, meter, historical and literary interests. 
Prerequisites, Courses 51, 52. Three hours a week. 

59, 60. The Victorian Period (1830-1900). — A study of the literary, 
social, and scientific movements in England and America, the rise of 
periodical literature tractarianism ; pre-Raphaelitism, with special at- 
tention to Carlyle, Emerson, Newman, Matthew Arnold, Ruskin, Ten- 
nyson, Clough, Robert Browning, D. G. Rossetti, Dickens, Thackeray, 
George Eliot, Jane Austen, and the Brontes. Two hours a week. 

61, 62. History of the English Drama. — Special attention is given 
to the immediate predecessors and the contemporaries of Shakespeare. 
Two hours a week. Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 



126 



English 

63. Teachers' Course in English. — A. This course is conducted 
in cooperation with the department of Education. It is open only to 
major students in English, and of these only, as a rule, to seniors and 
graduate students. The work is mainly practical with some theory. 
See Education 75 and 76. B. The aims, methods, and problems of 
teaching English composition and literature in high school and in 
college. Open to seniors who expect to teach English. Two hours a 
week. 

66. Poetics and Prosody. — A study of the various poetic forms, as 
lyric, epic, drama, and the English meters. Two hours a week. 

67, 68. The Eighteenth Century (1700-1770). — A study of the rise 
of prose, the essay, the magazine, the novel, and the beginnings of 
romanticism, with especial attention to Addison, Steele, Swift, Defoe, 
Pope, Johnson, Goldsmith, Gray. Lectures, assigned reading, and 
reports. Two hours a week. 

Primarily for graduates 

101, 102. History and Theory of Literary Criticism. — Thr?e 
hours a week. 

103, 104. Types of Literature. — A comparative study of various lit- 
erary forms. Three hours a week. Prerequisite, Courses 101, 102. 

105, 106. Milton and His Age. — This course is devoted to problems 
cf form, sources, and literary influences and relations. Two hours a 
week. 

107, 108. Seminar. — The subject varies from year to year, and is 
determined by the needs of students in attendance. 

Summer Term 

Professor Gray; Mr. Keyes 

5s. English Composition and Rhetoric. — Considerable attention is 
given in this course, by way of review, to matters of good and bad 
usage, the sentence, and the paragraph. The advanced work embraces 



127 



College of Arts and Seiences 

the study of rhetoric especially relative to expository writing. Daily 
themes and weekly essays, with conferences. 

6s. English Composition and Rhetoric. — This course comprises 
the theory and practice of argumentative writing. Simple briefs, short 
and long written arguments, with conferences. 

19s. Special course in argumentation, particularly for students and 
teachers interested in prepatation for the Maine State Interscholastic 
Discussion League. 

33s. Shakespeare and the English Drama. — Lectures and discus- 
sions on Shakespeare's art. Four plays are studied in detail ; and several 
more are required to be read. The origin and development of the 
English drama is outlined 03 lectures and illustrated by stereopticon. 
The Oxford Shakespeare, complete in one volume, is recommended. 

51s. Old English (Anglo-Saxon). — A first course, designed to intro- 
duce the student of English to the historical study of the language, and 
to the beginnings of English prose and poetry. Elements of Old English 
grammar; reading of easy prose and poetry. Constant reference is made 
to the relation of Old English to Modern English and Modern German. 
Lectures on the literature of the period 700-1000. This course is essen- 
tial for teachers of English, and for all who wish a thoro knowledge 
of the language and literature. This course may count three hours 
credit toward the master's degree. Open to graduate students and ad- 
vanced undergraduates. 

52s. Beowulf. — This, the oldest English epic, is read with attention 
to text, meter, literary and archeological interests. Prerequisite, Course 
51s. This course may count three hours credit toward the master's 
degree. 

Either Course 51s or 52s will be given, according to demand. 

63s. Teachers' Course. — The aims, methods, and problems of teach- 
ing English composition and literature in the high school will be discussed 
and illustrated. Stress will be placed, this session, upon the preparation 
of the teacher, drill in the criticism of essays and the consideration of 
labor-saving devices connected therewith, interest as a factor in the 



128 



French 

study of literature, development of ideas as a factor in composition, and 
the discussion of the important recently published articles on the 
teaching of English. The plan of the course is sufficiently flexible for 
the presentation of special topics or problems by the teachers in attend- 
ance, and so far as practicable, their problems will receive attention. 
This course may count three hours credit toward the master's degree. 

103s. Types of Literature. — This course is an introduction to the 
study of comparative literature. Great books, typical of the principal 
forms of literature will be read. The aim of the reading and discus- 
sions will be to cultivate an appreciation of the best and to lay the 
foundations for a critical knowledge of what constitutes a great epic, 
drama, lyric, novel, etc. This course may count three hours credit 
toward the master's degree. Open to graduate students ; and under- 
graduates only by special permission. The course pre-supposes consider 
able knowledge of literature. 

FRENCH 

Professor Segall; Mr. Kueny 

For undergraduates 

1, 2. Elementary French. — Grammar, pronunciation, composition, 
conversation, translation. Five hours a week. 

3. Intermediate French. — Translation, grammar, composition, con- 
versation. Open to students who have taken Courses 1, 2, or an equiva- 
lent. Three hours a week. 

4. Intermediate French.— A continuation of Course 3. Two hours a 

week. 

5. Advanced French. — Translation; drill in conversation. Open to 
students who have taken Courses 3, 4, or an equivalent. Three hours a 

week. 

6. Advanced French. — A continuation of Course 5. Two hours a 

week. 



129 



College of Arts and Sciences 

7. Elementary French Conversation and Composition. — Open to 
students who have taken Courses I, 2, or an equivalent. Two hours a 
week. 

8. Elementary French Conversation and Composition. — A contin- 
uation of Course 7. Two hours a week. 

9. Advanced French Conversation and Composition — Open to stu- 
dents who have taken Courses 7, 8, or an equivalent. Two hours a 
week. 

10. Advanced French Conversation and Composition. — A continua- 
tion of Course 9. Two hours a week. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

51. Introduction to the History of French Literature. — Lectures, 
recitations. Open to students who have taken Courses 5 and 6. Three 
hours a week. 

52. Introduction to the History of French Literature. — A contin- 
uation of Course 51. Three hours a week. 

53. The Modern French Novel. — Lectures, recitations. Open to 
students who have taken Courses 5, 6. Two hours a week. 

54. The Modern French Novel. — A continuation of Course 53. Two 
hours a week. 

55. The Modern French Drama. — Lectures, recitations. Open to 
students who have taken Courses 5, 6. Two hours a week. 

56. The Modern French Drama. — A continuation of Course 55. 
Two hours a week. 

57. How to Teach French. —Lectures, recitations, practical exercises. 
Open to seniors who have taken Courses 9 and 10, or an equivalent. 
One hour a week. 

58. How to Teach French. — A continuation of Course 57. One 
hour a week. 



130 



French 

Primarily for graduates 
101, 102. Moliere. — Two hours a week. 

Summer Term 
Professor Segall; Mr. Kueny 

For undergraduates 

5s. Advanced French. — This course is an equivalent of Course 5. 

6s. Advanced French. — This course is an equivalent of Course 6. 

7s. Elementary French Conversation and Composition. — This 
course is an equivalent of Course 7. 

8s. Elementary French Conversation and Composition. — This 
course is an equivalent of Course 8. 

Primarily for graduates 

57s, 58s. How to Teach French. — This course is an equivalent of 
Courses 57, 58. 

101s. Rabelais. — Renaissance and Reformation. Given in 1916. 

102s. Moliere. — The classic period. Given in 1917. 

103s. Voltaire. — The revolutionary period. Given in 1918. 

104s. Victor Hugo. — The romantic period. Given in 1919. 

GEOLOGY 

The courses in in this subject are described with those in the depart- 
ment of Biological Chemistry 



131 



College of Arts and Sciences 

GERMAN 

Professor G. W. Thompson; Assistant Professor Drummond; Mr. 
Bain; Mr. Floyd; Mr. Segal; Miss Kelly 

For undergraduates only 

i, 2. First Year German. — A course for beginners, open only to 
students who are registered in the College of Arts and Sciences. Gram- 
mar; composition; reading of numerous texts; conversation. Five 
hours a week. 

3, 4. Second Year German. — A course for students who have had 
Course 1, 2 or the equivalent. The grammar study, composition and 
text readings are progressively advanced from Course 1, 2. Three 
hours a week in the fall semester ; two hours a week in the spring 
semester. 

5, 6. Third Year German. — A course for students who have had 
Courses 1, 2, 3, 4 or the equivalent. Texts include 18th and 19th cen- 
tury literature; advanced composition; lectures on the history of Ger- 
man literature. Three hours a week. 

7, 8. Fourth Year German. — A course for students who have had 
Courses 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 or the equivalent. Critical reading of standard 
works principally from the 19th century literature; lectures on the 
structure of the drama; advanced composition with original themes. 
Three hours a week. 



Note. These courses are carefully graded in difficulty and are to be 
taken in the order named. For the convenience of students not regis- 
tered in the College of Arts and Sciences who wish to begin the study 
of German the following courses are offered: 

Course 1, 2. A separate division for those who wish to pursue be- 
ginners' German five hours a week, or Courses 9, 10 and 11, 12 in which 
the work of Course I, 2 may be completed in two years. 

9, 10. Elementary German. — Study of grammar, composition, and 
easy texts which contain a practical vocabulary. Three hours a week 
in the fall semester; two hours a week in the spring semester. 



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German 

ii, 12. Continuation of Course 9, 10. — More advanced study of 
grammar, composition and texts. Open to students who have completed 
Course 9, 10 or the equivalent. Three hours a week in the fall semester ; 
two hours a week in the spring semester. 



Note. Course 11, 12 is not an equivalent for Course 3, 4. Courses 
9, 10 and n, 12 are not open to students registered in the College of 
Arts and Sciences. 

13, 14. Elementary German Conversation. — Three hours a week. 

15, 16. Scientific German. — Separate divisions for Biology and 

Chemistry students. Open only to students whose previous study of 

German will enable them to read scientific German with profit. Two 
hours a week. 

17, 18. Advanced German Conversation and Composition — Two 
hours a week. 



Note. Courses 13, 14 and 17, 18 are conducted entirely in German. 
19, 20. German Poetry. — Two hours a week. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

51, 52. History of German Civilization. — Two hours a week. 

53, 54. Faust. — History and development of the Faust idea; incisive 
study of Goethe's Faust; Goethe's life; influence of Faust. Two hours 
a week. 

55, 56. Studies in Nineteenth Century Literature. — Lectures on 
the important literary movements in Germany; critical study of Roman- 
ticism, Young Germany, and Modern Realism ; study of current liter- 
ature. Two hours a week. 

57, 58. Studies in Eighteenth Century Literature. — Special at- 
tention is given to the life and works of Klopstock, Lessing, Wieland, 
Herder, Goethe, Schiller. Two hours a week. 



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College of Arts and Sciences 

59, 60. Advanced Composition. — Critical study of the art of para- 
graphing; discussion of German literary models; development of style. 
One hour a week. 

61, 62. Medieval Literature. — Analysis and reading of the great 
German epics; study of the Minnesong; the causes and influences which 
affected the rise and fall of medieval literature. Two hours a week. 

Primarily for graduates 

101, 102. Gothic. — Introduction to the subject of philology; pho- 
netics; study and reading of Gothic. Open to students whose major is 
German. Two hours a week. 

103, 104. Old High German. — Wright's Old High German Primer. 
The condition for electing this course is the same as for Course 101, 
102. Two hours a week. 

105, 106. Middle High German. — Translation of Middle High Ger- 
man texts. The conditions for electing this course is the same as for 
Courses 101, 102 and 103, 104. Two hours a week. 

107, 108. Advanced Literature. — Research work; original investiga- 
tion. Two hours a week. 



Note. Course 5, 6 may be taken by graduates who elected Course 3, 
4 in their senior year. Collateral reading is a part of all German 
courses, in which the use of simple texts is designed to increase the 
vocabulary and cultivate fluency of translation. The abundance of texts 
now available offers so wide a choice and variation that it is deemed 
inexpedient to name a list of books which will be read. 

Summer Term 

Professor G. W. Thompson; Assistant Professor Drummond 

is. Elementary Course. — For those who wish to acquire or review 
the essentials of German grammar and the foundation of a German 
vocabulary. 



134 



Greek and Classical Archaeology 

2s. Second Year German. — This course is designed for students who 
have completed a year's work in German, or for such teachers as may 
wish to review their work in this department. 

3s. Conversational German. — For those who have taken at least one 
year of German and wish to get practice in speaking and hearing Ger- 
man. German stories will be reproduced orally and in writing. There 
will also be German dictation and memorizing of German songs. 

4s. German Literature. — A brief course of lectures covering a period 
of German literature. This course is designed for advanced students. 

Other advanced courses in German may be substituted for Courses 
2 and 3 if they seem better adapted to the needs of the students. 

The following three courses are offered as graduate work leading to 
a degree and presuppose on the part of the student a reading and, as 
fai as possible, speaking knowledge of the language. 

5s. A Critical Study of the Classical Period of the Eighteenth 
Century. — Lectures, references, and discussions. 

6s. Naturalism in Germany, its Causes, Character, and Influ- 
ence. — Lectures, references, and discussions. Three times a week. 

7s. Goethe and Faust. — An incisive study of the life of Goethe; the 
origin and interpretation of Faust as a work of literature. Twice a week. 

GREEK AND CLASSICAL ARCHEOLOGY 

Professor Huddilston 

The department of Greek and Classical Archeology is arranged with 
the idea of presenting the several phases of Hellenic civilization. Such 
courses are offered as will prove serviceable not only to those pursuing 
the classical languages, but to the student of average interests who, not 
having studied Greek in the fitting school, may desire to include in his 
college curriculum some work bearing on the permanent literary and art 
values contributed by the ancient Greeks to the civilization of both 
ancient and modern times. 



135 



college of Arts and Sciences 

1. Xenophon. — Hellenica, Books I-IV. Study of syntax, and daily 
exercises in writing Greek. Four hours a week. 

2. Homer. — Odyssey, Books VI-XII. The reading of the remaining 
books, in English translation, is required. Assigned readings on the 
history of Greek poetry, "the Homeric question," and Homeric antiqui- 
ties. Four hours a week. 

3. Attic Orators. — Some of the shorter orations of Demosthenes; 
selections from the minor Attic orators ; parallel reading on the history 
of Greek prose literature, and the public economy and social life of 
Athens. Two hours a week. 

4. Greek Tragedy. — Euripides's Medea and Sophocles's Antigone 1 . 
The reading of several other plays in English translation is required; 
also, parallel reading on the history of the Greek tragic drama. Three 
hours a week. 

5. Elementary Greek. — The declensions, conjugations; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, Books I-II, and daily writing of Greek based on the text. 
Five hours a week. 

6. Xenophon and Homer. — Anabasis, Books III-IV; sight reading 
in Attic prose ; selections from Homer's Iliad. Five hours a week. 

Courses 7-54 offer an introduction to the literature, religion, customs, 
art, and history, and may be taken by students who wish to devote only 
a year or two to Greek subjects. 

7. Greek Private Life. — Text-book, lectures, illustrated with lantern 
slides and photographs; assigned reading. Two hours a week. 

8. Greek Religion. — A study of the chief divinities in ancient Greek 
religion, and their relation to art and literature; lectures and assigned 
reading; investigation of special topics by members of the class. Two 
hours a week. 

9. 10. Greek and Roman Civilization. — This course has nothing 
II! common with the "Ancient History" of the preparaatory schools. It 
is rather the achievements of the Greeks and Romans in laying the 

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Greek and Classical Archeology 

foundations of so much that is the basis of our modern day life and 
thought to which attention is directed. Some examination is made of 
Egyptian and Eastern civilization as the historic background on which 
developed Classical life and action. An important part of the course 
lies in the emphasis that is given to the Greek thought and Roman rule 
in the midst of which Christianity sprang up. 

Students who take Greek 53 and 54 after this course will get the 
projection of Classical civilization, especially literature and philosophy, 
as it culminated in the Renaissance of Italy, France and England. 
While especially the needs of freshmen are kept to the front in this 
course it is open to all students. 

Instruction is entirely by lectures and each student is required to 
keep a note-book, and also have as parallel reading Seignobos's Ancient 
Civilization. Three hours a week. 

51. Greek Literature. — The history of poetry; epic, lyric, and dram- 
atic. Types and standards of verse composittion established by the 
Ancient Greeks, and some consideration of the Greek influence upon later 
poetry, particularly the epic. Lectures and readings from English trans- 
lations. Each student will be expected to make a special study of some 
one author, and in the treatment of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, 
at least one play of each will be read in class, members of the class 
taking the several parts. This course as well as the next on prose 
literature, is intended to be foundational for students majoring in clas- 
sics or in modern languages. Three hours a week. Given in 1915-16 and 
alternate years. 

52. Greek Literature. — The history of prose literature in ancient 
Greece. History, oratory, and philosophy will be traced in succession. 
Students will be expected to do parallel reading, especially in Thucy- 
dides, Demosthenes and Plato. This course may be taken enly in con- 
nection with Greek 51 and like the latter is intended to place the stu- 
dent in touch with the forces of lasting value in Greek letters. Three 
hours a week. Given in 1915-16 and alternate years. 

53. 54- Classical Civilization. — A seminar course throughout the 
year, open only to those who have taken Greek 9, 10 and intended to 
place the student in touch with the Classical Heritage of the Middle 
Ages and the part played especially by Greece in the Revival of Learn- 
ing. Lectures, discussions by members of the class, and written and 
oral reports. Two hours a week. 

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College of Arts and Sciences 

HISTORY 

Professor Colvin ; Mr. Whitmore 
For undergraduates only 

i. Medieval History. — A general course covering the period from 
395 to 1500 A. D. The disintegration of the Roman Empire; ecclesias- 
tical institutions ; feudalism ; struggle between the papacy and the em- 
pire; rise of modern nations. Required of major students in history. 
Not open to freshmen. Three hours a week. 

2. Modern History. — Continuation of Course 1 to the present time. 
A rapid survey of the Reformation ; the absolute monarchy in France, 
the French Revolution; the Napoleonic era; Europe in the nineteenth 
century. Not open to freshmen. Three hours a week. 

3. History of England. — From early times to the beginning of the 
Stuart period. Especial attention is given to social and industrial con- 
ditions. Not open to freshmen. Three hours a week. 

4. History of England. — Continuation of Course 3. From the begin- 
ning of the Stuart period to the present. Not open to freshmen. Three 
hours a week. 

5. History of the United States. — A general course from 1848 to 
the present time. Open to technical students only. Two hours a week. 

6. Recent History. — This course deals mainly with the 20th century. 
A special study is made of some of the most important events in the 
year in which the course is given. Not open to freshmen. Two hours 
a week. 

7. 8. United States History and Government. — This course is open 
to freshmen only and credit will not be given except for the full years' 
work. Three hours a week. 

9. History of the United States. — The period from 1783 to 1848. 
This course will begin with a brief study of Colonial history from 1750. 
Not open to freshmen. Three hours a week. 

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History 

10. History of the United States. — A continuation of Course fo. 
from 1848 to the present time. Not open to freshmen. Three hours a 

week . 

For graduates and undergraduates 

51. The Renaissance. — This course takes up the Renaissance as 
an intellectual and social movement in Italy and its expansion into 
France, England, and Germany. Students taking this course will he 
expected to take the course in Italian Art. Three hours a week. 

52. The Reformation. — This course is primarily a study of the 
Protestant revolt, but an introductory study will be made of Waldo, 
St. Francis of Assisi, and religious conditions during the Renaissance. 
Three hours a week. 

53. Modern Continental Europe. — The period from the Peace of 
Utrecht to 1789. Three hours a week. 

54. Modern Continental Europe. — Period of the French Revolu- 
tion and Napoleon I. Three hours a week. 

55. Modern Continental Europe. — The period since 1815. Three 
hours a week. 

56. 57. Industrial and Social History of England. — The medieval 
manor town, guild, and foreign trade ; Black death and Peasants' Re- 
bellion ; breaking up of the medieval system ; expansion of England ; the 
industrial revolution; government control in the nineteenth century; and 
the growth of voluntary association. This course is continuous for the 
year and during the latter half is carried over into Colonial and United 
States social and industrial history. 

58, 59. Historical Construction and Criticism. — One hour a week. 

Summer Term 

Professor Colvin 

is. United States History. — From i860 to the present time. Especial 
attention will be given to the Civil War and Reconstruction periods. 

139 



College of Arts and Sciences 

2s. Europe since 1815. — This course will be a study of the past ceu- 
tury in an effort to understand some causes of the present war. 

3s. Spanish-American History. — This course will take up Spanish 
colonization and its comparison and contrast with the English ; the rise 
and development of independent Spanish American States ; the relations 
between the U. S. and the Spanish American state, and the Pan- 
American idea. 

Arrangements may be made for taking either Course 2s or 3s for 
graduate credit as a minor subject. 

LATIN 

Professor Chase 

For undergraduates only 

1. Livy. — Selections from Livy, History of Rome; composition, with 
review of Latin syntax. Four hours a week. 

2. Cicero and Horace. — Cicero, De Senectute; Horace, Odes and 
Epodes ; Latin composition. Four hours a week. 

3. Tacitus. — Reading and discussion of the Agricola and Germania. 
Three hours a week. 

4. Terence and Plautus. — The Phormio of Terence ; the Captivi 
and Trinummus of Plautus ; study of early Latin and the development 
of Roman comedy. Three hours a week. 

8. Teachers' Course. — Discussion of topics connected with the teach- 
ing of Latin in secondary schools. Study of selected passages of Caesar, 
Cicero, and Vergil. Two hours a week. Given in 1915-16 and alternate 
years. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

51. Latin Composition. — Practice in writing Latin; study of Latin 
syntax. One hour a week. 



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Latin 

52. Latin Composition. — Practice in writing Latin; study of Latin 
rhetoric. One hour a week. 

53. The Younger Pliny. — Reading of selected letters of Pliny; the 
Roman Empire. Three hours a week. Given in 1916-17 and alternate 
years. 

54. Horace and Juvenal. — Reading of selections from the great 
satirists ; study of Roman satire and social life. Three hours a week. 
Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 

55. Tacitus. — Reading of the Annales and study of the reign of 
Tiberius. Three hours a week. Given in 1915-16 and alternate years. 

56. The Roman Elegiac Poets. — Selections from Catullus, Tibullus, 
Propertius, and Ovid; study of elegiac poetry. Three hours a week. 
Given in 1915-16 and alternate years. 

57. 58. Roman Philosophy. — Reading from Cicero's philosophical 
writings and from Lucretius ; discussion of the leading schools of 
ancient philosophy. Three hours a week. Given in 1914-15 and alter- 
nate years. 

59, 60. Roman Rhetoric and Oratory. — Quintilian (selections from 
the Institutio Oratoria) ; Tacitus (Dialogus de Oratoribus) ; Cicero 
(selections from the Brutus, De Oratore, and Orator). Open to 
students who have taken Courses 1, 4. Three hours a week. Given m 
1915-16 and alternate years. 

61. Roman Private Life. — Text-book work, supplemented by col- 
lateral reading and lectures upon some of the more important and in- 
teresting customs and institutions of Roman every-day life. Open to 
students who have taken Courses 1, 4. One hour a week. Given in 
1915-16 and alternate years. 

Primarily for graduates 

101, 102. Roman Literature. — General introduction to the subject; 
illustrative class-room readings. Open to students who have taken 
Courses 1, 4. Three hours a week. Given in 1916-17 and alternate 
years. 

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College of Arts and Sciences 

103, 104. The Latin Language.— A discussion of the fundamental 
principles of linguistic growth and change and of the relationship of 
Latin to other languages; Latin phonetics; the development of inflec- 
tional forms in Latin. Lectures and recitations. One hour a wee 1 :. 
Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 

105. Roman Numismatics. — Practice in the use of coins as original 
sources for the study of history, mythology, archeology, etc. One hout 
a week. Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 

107. Sanskrit. — An elementary course in the classical language of 
India, with especial reference to the light it throws upon the history and 
grammar of the languages of Europe. Two hours a week. Given 
when asked for by a sufficient number of students. 

108. Sanskrit. — A continuation of Course 107, with more attention 
f o the classical literature of India. Two hours a week. 

Summer Term 

8s. Teachers' Course. — Discussion of topics connected with the 
(teaching of Latin in secondary schools. Study of selected passages 
of Caesar, Cicero, and Vergil. 

2s. College Course. — A course for students who desire college credits 
looking to the B. A. degree. It is the plan of the department to offer a 
double course that shall cover the work of an entire college semester 
and to vary the course from year to year, so that a student in a few 
summers may complete a fairly comprehensive course of college study 
in Latin. The choice of the subjects will rest partly with the class. 
We call the especial attention of secondary school teachers who have 
not had the advantage of complete college training in Latin to these 
courses, as we believe they afford an unusual opportunity to them ro 
increase their equipment. 

103s. Graduate Study. — It is possible for a graduate student majoring 
in Latin to fulfill the requirements for the M. A. degree in four sum- 
mers. The department offers a series of advanced courses, of the 
value of three semester hours' credit each, extending over a period of 
four years. These will give twelve semester hours' credit and together 



142 



Mathematics and Astronomy 

with a thesis on some suitable Latin subject, will meet all the major 
requirements for the Master's degree. The courses offered, subject ro 
modifications upon due notice, are as follows : Critical Study of Latin 
Literature of the Ciceronian and Augustan Periods; Roman Philosophy; 
Roman Rhetoric and Oratory. In addition to the major work in Latin, 
a graduate student will be required to take work amounting approxi- 
mately to twelve semester hours in minor subjects. This work can be 
carried along with the Latin work and completed at the same time. 
It may be most conveniently divided between two subjects which bear 
some relation to the major work. The subjects best adapted for minors 
are English, History, French, Education, and German. 

MATHEMATICS 

Professor Hart; Assoctate Professor Willard; Assistant Profes- 
sor Hamlin; Assistant Professor Reed; Mr. Wilbur; Mr. Nord- 
gaard; Mr. Woods 

Students electing Mathematics as a major subject should expect to 
take Courses i, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8. 9, 51, 53, 54, 52, 61, and either Courses 15 
and 57 or Mechanics 7 and 8. They are also advised to take several 
courses in Physics. 

For undergraduates only 

1. Trigonometry. — The trigonometric functions; radian measure; 
functions of two or more angles ; logarithms ; solution of right and 
oblique triangles ; trigonometric equations ; inverse functions. Five 
hours a week. First ten weeks. 

2. Solid Geometry. — Solid and spherical geometry, including original 
demonstrations and the solution of numerical problems. Three hours 
a week. Open to all freshmen who did not offer it for admission. 

3. College Algebra. — A brief review of radicals, the theory of 
exponents, quadratic equations, and the binomial theorem ; determinants ; 
theory of equations. Five hours a week. Last eight weeks. 

5. Advanced Algebra. — Determinants and the solution of highei 
equations. Open to students who have taken Courses 1, 2, and 3. Three 
hours a week. 



143 



College of Arts and Sciences 



6. Analytic Geometry. — The point, line, circle, and conic sections ; 
higher plane curves ; elements of solid analytic geometry. Five hours 
a week. Open to students who have had Courses I and 3 and the 
equivalent of Course 2. 

7. Calculus. — Differentiation of the elementary forms of algebraic 
and transcendental functions ; successive differentiation ; differentials ; 
maxima and minima. Open to students who have taken Courses 1, 2, 
3, and 6. Five hours a week. 

8. Calculus. — A continuation of Course 7. Integration of the ele- 
mentary forms ; integration between limits ; integration as a summation ; 
various methods of integration. Applications of differential and integral 
calculus. Five hours a week. 

9. Spherical Trigonometry. — The elements of this subject with 
problems and applications to spherical astronomy. Two hours a week. 

11. Trigonometry for Agricultural Students. — A course essentially 
equivalent to Course 1. Three hours a week. 

12. Applications of Trigonometry. — A course given for students in 
Agriculture and Forestry, and open to others who have taken Course 
1 or 11. Further practice in the solution of problems with applications 
to plane surveying. Two hours a week. 

13. Differential and Integral Calculus. — A course given for stu- 
dents in Chemistry and for those in the College of Arts and Sciences 
who desire only a brief course in this subject. Three hours a week. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

51. Advanced Analytic Geometry. — A course for students who have 
completed Courses 5, 6, 7, and 8. Three hours a week. Given in 1916-17 
and alternate years. 

52. Solid Analytic Geometry. — A course based upon C. Smith's 
Solid Geometry. Three hours a week. Given in 1916-17 and alternate 
years. 



T44 



Mathematics and Astronomy 

53. Advanced Calculus. — This course is varied from time to time 
by using different texts. Open to students who have taken Courses 6, 
7, and 8. Three hours a week. Given in 191 5-16 and alternate years. 

54. Advanced Integral Calculus. — A continuation of Course 53. 
Three hours a week. Given in 1915-16 and alternate years. 

56. Differential Equations. — Open to students who have taken 
Courses 7, 8. Two hours a week. 

61. History of Mathematics. — Lectures and recitations. Two hours 
a week. Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 

101. Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable. — An elementary 
course in the treatment of analytic functions. The course includes a 
consideration of infinite series, both single and double, infinite products, 
conformal representation, and a brief application of the theory to 
Fourier's series, the gamma, beta, and Bessel functions, and spherical 
harmonies. Three hours a week. 

102. Elliptic Functions. — The Weirstrass and Jacobi functions. A 
brief treatment of transformation theory, and numerous examples. 
Three hours a week. 

103. Modern Analytic Geometry. — Homogeneous coordinates, ideal 
elements, principle of duality, and an analytic treatment of the straight 
line and the conies. Three hours a week. 

104. Modern Analytic Geometry. — A continuation of Course 103. 
Three hours a week. 

105. Thermodynamics. — The subject is considered more from a 
mathematical then from a physical standpoint. The subject is developed 
from fundamental principles, and is extended to systems of a more gen- 
eral character than those usually considered. Three hours a week. 

106. Thermodynamics. — A continuation of Course 105. Three hours 
a week. 



145 

TO 



College of Arts and Sciences 
Summer Term 

Professr Hart; Associate Professor Willard; Assistant Professor 

Hamlin 

Courses A, B, I, and 2 are planned to meet the needs of high school 
teachers who wish to review the subjects, or to study methods of teach- 
ing, as well as those of prospective candidates for admission to college 
who have not fully satisfied the entrance requirements in these subjects. 
All the teachers in this department of the Summer Term had experience 
in high school work before entering upon college teaching. Courses 3, 6, 
7, 8, 10 should appeal to teachers of high school mathematics who wish 
to extend their field of mathematical knowledge or to become can- 
didates for a degree. The remaining courses may be counted toward the 
bachelor's or, under suitable restrictions, toward the master's degree. 

A. High School Algebra. — A course intended for teachers in pre- 
paratory schools and covering the second year's work. Special attention 
will be given to the methods of presenting this subject and those topics 
will be emphasized that are most important in preparation for college 
work. Candidates for admission to the university who are deficient in 
a part of their preparation in algebra are advised to take this course. 

B. Plane Geometry. — A review of the more important theorems, 
with practice in the demonstration of original propositions and in the 
solution of numerical exercises. For teachers in preparatory schools 
and for candidates for admission who are slightly deficient in geometry. 

2s. Solid Geometry. — This course is offered especially for the benefit 
of students who intend to enter college, but who have not been able to 
complete the requirements in solid geometry. 

is. Plane Trigonometry. — The elements of plane trigonometry, in- 
cluding the solution of right and oblique plane triangles, and of prob- 
lems in surveying, together with the use of surveying instruments. No 
text-book will be required for this course, but those having logarithmic 
tables should bring them, and also any modern text-book on trigo- 
nometry, which may be useful for reference. 

3s. College Algebra. — The theory of quadratic equations, the bino- 
mial theorem, and so much of the regular freshman course in algebra 
as time will permit. 

146 



Mathematics and Astronomy 

6s. Analytic Geometry. — A brief course covering the elements of 
this subject. 

ys. Differential and Integral Calculus. — A course intended for 
teachers in preparatory schools who wish to gain a knowledge of the 
elements of this subject. 

8s. Integral Calculus. — The equivalent of Course 8 of the catalog. 
Open only to those who have previously studied the subject. 

ios. Descriptive Astronomy. — Lectures accompanied by work in the 
observatory. The only mathematics required is an elementary knowl- 
edge of geometry and plane trigonometry. 

5 is. Advanced Analytic Geometry, equivalent to a part of Course 
51 of the catalog. 

53s. Advanced Calculus, equivalent to a part of Course 53 of the 
catalog. 

101s. Theory of Functions, equivalent to a part of Course 101 of the 
catalog. 

58s. Observatory Work. 

By suitable selection of topics, a candidate should be able to complete 
the work for the master's degree in four or five summer terms, the exact 
time depending upon his mathematical ability and previous mathematical 
preparation. 

The department is supplied with a small but carefully selected list of 
mathematical models, and, for work in astronomy, has an observator> 
equipped with an eight inch Clark equatorial, a three inch Bamberg 
astronomical transit, and other instruments. 

MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

The courses in this department are described on page 20s. 



147 



College of Arts and Sciences 

PHILOSOPHY 

Prfessor Craig 

i. Evolution. — Evolution of stars, of the earth, of life, of mind, 
of socieity; laws of heredity; eugenics. The course gives a concise 
treatment of these topics, as foundation for studies in psychology, 
sociology, and allied fields. Three hours a week. 

2. Anthropology. — The early history of man. Origins of the arts 
and sciences, of language, of social life, customs, and institutions. 
Comparison of races and of civilizations. Three hours a week. 

5, 6. Logic. — A course in logic will be given when there are six or 
more students who wish to take it. Two hours a week. 

51. Psychology. — The subjects treated in this course are the anatomy 
and physiology of the nervous system and sense-organs, and the psy- 
chology of sensation, perception, instinct, and habit. The methods used 
are recitation, discussion, introspection (self -observation), observation 
of others, experiment, and demonstration. Three hours a week. 

52. Psychology. — A continuation of course 51, dealing especially 
with the higher psychic functions, such as imagination, conception, 
reasoning, emotion, and will. Three hours a week. 

53. Applied Psychology. — Psychology of the fine arts ; psychology 
of business, advertising, politics, social control ; mental mechanisms, 
with a brief discussion of dreams, hypnotism, insanity. Lectures, read- 
ing. Two hours a week. 

54. Social Psychology. — A study of the social aspects of the indi- 
vidual mind; of the instincts which underlie all social life; of social 
influence and social control; of fashion, convention, and custom; of the 
crowd, the mob, the public, and the deliberative assembly. A knowledge 
of elementary psychology is a prerequisite. Two hours a week. 

55. Genetic Psychology. — Mental development of the individual : 
childhood, adolescence, maturity. Prerequisite: a knowledge of ele- 
mentary psychology. Two hours a week. 

148 



Philosophy 

58. Experimental Psychology. — A laboratory course, which is best 
taken in connection with course 52. Experiments on sensation, percep- 
tion, imagination, learning, memory, etc. Students registering for this 
course should, if possible, find partners for experiments requiring co- 
operation. *Four hours a week. 

81. History of Philosophy. — Greek Philosophy. A rapid survey of 
Jewish, Roman, and early Christian philosophy. The Middle Ages, the 
Renaissance, and the beginnings of modern thought. A text-book will 
bo used. Three hours a week. Given in 191 5-16 and alternate years. 

82. History of Modern Philosophy. — A continuation of the preced- 
ing course, bringing the history of thought down to the present day. 
German, French, British, and American philosophy. Three hours a 
week. Given in 1916 and alternate years. 

83. Ethics. — History of moral codes, ideas, and customs. The 
scientific basis of morality. Applications to practical problems. Three 
hours a week. Given in 1916-1917 and alternate years. 

98. Readings in Psychology and Philosophy. — The readings 
which will be made the basis of recitations, discussions, and lectures, 
may be in any one of the various branches of psychology and philoso- 
phy; the branch is chosen depending largely upon the interests of the 
class. Prerequisite, one or more courses in psychology or philosophy; 
students intending to register for this course should consult the in- 
structor. Three hours a week. Given in 1917 and alternate years. 

99, 100. Seminar. — Reviews of current psychological literature. So- 
cial psychology is emphasized. Magazine articles or books are assigned 
to individual students, to be abstracted and reported upon. The student 
may select those topics in which he is especially interested. The work 
may be continued a number of semesters. One hour a week. 

101, 102. Research. — The number of hours a week is not fixed, but 
must be arranged at the time of registration. 



149 



College of Arts and Sciences 

PHYSICS 

Professor Stevens; Associate Professor Woodman; Assistant Pro- 
fessor Holmes ; Mr. French ; Mr. Brown 

Note. — For students who are specializing in this department, the 
time indicated for the various laboratory courses may be extended. 
Two and one-half hours of laboratory work give a credit of one hour. 

For undergraduates only 

i. General Physics. — Recitations and lectures on the dynamics of 
solids, liquids, and gases; sound and light; experiments before the class; 
problems. Open to students who have taken Mathematics i. Five 
hours a week. 

2. General Physics. — A continuation of Course i. Heat and elec- 
tricity. Three hours a week. 

3. Qualitative Laboratory Work. — A course in which students who 
are preparing to become teachers of physics are given the opportunity 
of performing the various class-room experiments which accompany the 
lectures in Courses 1 and 2. *Five hours a week. 

4. Laboratory Physics. — The subjects usually included in an under- 
graduate course. Especial attention is given to the reduction of obser- 
vations and the tabulation of results. Open to students who have taken 
either Course 1 or Course 5. *Five hours a week. 

5. General Physics. — A course covering the ground of Courses 1 
and 2, with more attention to the experimental and historical aspects, 
and less to the mathematical. Five hours a week. 

6. Meteorology. — A course covering the essential principles of the 
subject of meteorology, including a study of meteorological instruments 
emd weather predictions. Three hours a week. 

7. Meteorology. — A continuation of Course 6, dealing with special 
topics, and a discussion of the results obtained at the meteorological 
observatory. One hour a week recitation; *two and one-half hours a 
njeek laboratory. 

150 



Physics 

8. Elementary Physics. — This course is to be taken only by stu- 
dents in Home Economics, and will consist of four recitations and one 
laboratory period per week. Five hours a week. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

50. Optics. — Lectures and recitations in continuation of Course 1. 
Open to students who have taken Mathematics 8. Three hours a week. 
Given in 1915-16 and alternate years. 

51. Mechanics and Heat. — Advanced laboratory work in continua- 
tion of Course 4. *Seven and one-half hours a week, or *five hours a 
week. 

52. Optics. — Advanced laboratory work in continuation of Course 4. 
*Seven and one-half hours a week, or *five hours a week. 

53. Electrical Measurements. — Advanced laboratory work in con- 
tinuation of Course 4. *Seven and one-half hours a week. 

55. Theory of Electricity and Magnetism. — Lectures and recita- 
tions on the mathematical theory of potential, capacity, and inductance, 
with application to direct current phenomena. Two hours a week. 

57. Problems in Electricity. — This course may only be taken in 
connection with Course 55 or Course 59, as the problems will be 
selected from the work covered in those courses. One or two hours a 
week. 

58. Mathematical Physics. — The application of mathematical 
methods to the treatment of problems in physics. Two hours a wezk- 
Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 

59. Theory of Alternating Currents. — Continuation of Course 55 
with applications to alternating current phenomena; the addition and 
subtraction of vector quantities ; the analysis of wave forms by use of 
Fourier's series ; the algebra of complex numbers. Two hours a week. 

60. Sound. — Lectures and recitations in continuation of Course 1. 
Open to students who have taken Mathematics 8. Three hours a week. 
Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 



151 



College of Arts and Sciences 

61. Heat. — An advanced course in heat in continuation of Course 2. 
Three hours a week. Given in 1915-16 and alternate years. 

62. Thermodynamics. — An elementary course in thermodynamics. 
Two hours a week. 

63. Theory of Measurements. — A text-book course covering the 
more important topics treated in this subject. Two hours a week. 

64. Problems in Thermodynamics. — This course may be taken in 
connection with Course 62, by those desiring further training in the 
solution of practical problems in thermodynamics. One or two hours 
a week. 



of juniors in 



65. Precision of Measurements. — Lectures required c 
mechanical engineering. One hour a week for five weeks. 

69. Radio-Activity. — A combined lecture and laboratory course. 
Elementary quantitative experiments in radio-activity are performed. 
Two hours a week. Given in 1915-16 and alternate years. 

Primarily for graduates 

101. Special Laboratory Course. — A course open to students who 
have completed Courses 51, 52, 53. A subject is assigned for origi- 
nal investigation, or the work of a published research is repeated. *Five 
hours a week. 

102. Special Laboratory Course. — A continuation of Course 101. 
*Seven and one-half hours a week. 

103. Radiation. — This course comprises lectures and outside read- 
ing on the following topics: the electromagnetic theory of light; the 
development of Maxwell's equations ; the application of Maxwell's 
equations to the reflection, refraction, and polarization of light; the 
radiation and absorption of a theoretical black body; the theories ot 
emission and absorption; electric waves and light pressure. Two hours 
a week. Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 



152 



Physics. 

105, 106. Mathematical Physics. — A course more advanced in char- 
acter than Course 58. It is designed to prepare students for reading 
mathematical books and papers in connection with their work for a 
doctor's degree. Three hours a week. 

Summer Term 

Professor Stevens ; Associate Professor Woodman 

is. Elementary Laboratory Course. — This includes a list of experi- 
ments which would be accepted for admission to the University of 
Maine. The course is especially adapted for teachers who wish to 
become familiar with the methods of conducting an elementary labora- 
tory course. The complete set of apparatus is assembled in the labora- 
tory, and full directions are given for performing each experiment. 

2s. General Laboratory Course. — This corresponds to the course 
given in the university for all students in the College of Technology. 
It is based on Miller's Laboratory Manual, and includes experiments 
along the lines of mechanics, heat, light, sound, and electricity. 

3s. College Physics. — A course based upon those parts of Kimball's 
College Physics which treat of mechanics, light, and sound. This course 
may be taken for credit only by students who have covered the ground 
in Physics 1. 

4s. College Physics. — A course based upon those parts of Kimball's 
College Physics which treat of electricity and heat. This course may 
be taken for credit only by students who have covered the ground in 
Physics 2. 

5s. Advanced Laboratory Courses. — These courses are offered in 
optics, electrical measurements, and heat. They are of a more advanced 
nature than those in Course 2s, which is a prerequisite for them. 

6s. Advanced Laboratory Course for Graduate Credit. — This course 
will be adapted to the requirements of the students, and will be offered 
to such students as have completed the courses above listed. The work 
will be in the nature of a repetition of a published experiment, or it may 
be an original investigation. 



153 



College of Arts and Sciences 

7s. Advanced Physics. — A course for candidates for the master's 
degree will be offered in this department each summer. The course will 
vary for four successive terms so that the student may have an oppor- 
tunity to cover a wide field. For 1916 the subject will be Theory of 
Measurements, and will, when completed, count for two credits on the 
university books. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING^ 

Professor Daggett; Mr. Cranston 

Courses 1 and 2, 3 and 4, are elementary courses; the advanced 
courses are intended for students who expect to make use of public 
speaking in college or in after life, and for students who wish to over- 
come individual faults in everyday speech. Students interested in any 
form of speech-making or debate are advised to take Course 5 at their 
earliest opportunity. This course may be followed by Course 6 or 
Course 8, according to individual interests. 

For undergraduates only 

1, 2. Public Speaking. — Practical training in the fundamentals of 
effective speaking. During the year, the student studies and analyses 
several pieces of exposition, argumentation, and persuation, and re- 
ports in writing on his investigation. He also prepares original 
speeches and delivers them before the class. In the speaking, constant 
attention is given to diction and to correction of individual faults. The 
student's grade depends more upon right effort and improvement than 
upon natural qualifications for speaking. Conferences are required. 
Open only to freshmen in the College of Arts and Sciences. One hour 
a week. 

3, 4. Public Speaking. — Similar to Courses 1 and 2, with the ex- 
ception that more attention is given to exposition and the adaptation 
of technical subject-matter to speaking. Speeches will be delivered for 
the purpose of training the speaker to address a business meeting, or a 
popular audience, on a technical subject. Outside reading and written 
reports are required of all students. Conferences are required of stu- 
dents who need special drill. With the permission of the instructor, 
especially qualified students may substitute any elective course in pub- 



154 



Public Speaking 

lie speaking, for the required 3 and 4. One hour a week. Open only 
to sophomores in the College of Agriculture and Technology. 

5. Debating. A systematic study of the principles of argumenta- 
tion. Special study of analysis of the proposition, briefing, treatment 
of evidence, refutation, and the preparation of forensics as applied ro 
formal debate. Monthly briefs, conferences, and oral debate. Two 
hours a week. Prerequisites, English 5, 6, or 7, 8. 

Students not interested in oral debate should elect Eh. n. (Argu- 
mentative composition). Either English 11, or Course 5 give funda- 
mental training for Course 6 and Course 8. 

6. Advanced Debating. — A review and continuation of 5, but devot- 
ing relatively more time to practice in oral debate. Open to a limited 
number of students who have shown ability in argumentation or de- 
bate. Prerequisites, Course 5 or English 11. Two hours a week. With 
instructor's consent, Course 6 may be repeated with credit. 

7. Oral English. — A fundamental course in voice production, dic- 
tion and extempore speaking. Practice in reading lyric, narrative, and 
dramatic forms, with constant application to the requirements of public 
speech. Prerequisites, English 5, 6 or 7, 8. 

8. The Occasional Public Speech. — A study of persuasion as ap- 
plied to the various forms of public address. The plan and method of 
typical speeches will be studied. The student will also prepare and 
deliver original speeches illustrating such various forms of public 
discourse as the eulogy, the commencement oration, the anniversary 
speech, the speech in behalf of a cause, the informal discussion, and 
the after-dinner speech. There will be both oral and written exercises, 
and monthly conferences. Two hours a week. Prerequisite, Course 5. 



L 0D 



College of Arts and Sciences 

SPANISH AND ITALIAN 

Professor Raggio 

Spanish 

For undergraduates only 

I, 2. Spanish for Beginners. — In this course stress will be laid 
upon grammar, reading, and composition. The instructor will insist 
upon careful pronunciation and accurate translation. At the end of 
the course the student should be able to read at sight easy Spanish 
prose. During the spring semester collateral reading will be assigned. 
Three hours a week. 

3, 4. Spoken Spanish. — Stress will be laid in this course upon 
dictation and conversation. There will be frequent exercises in 
declamation and oral composition. Students will be expected to read, 
memorize, and declaim selections in prose and verse. Open to students 
who pass Courses 1, 2 with a grade not lower than B, or who otherwise 
satisfy the instructor of their fitness to take the course. Tzvo hours a 
week. 

5, 6. Spanish Prose of the Nineteenth Century. — The object 
of this course is to acquire a sufficient reading knowledge of Spanish to 
be able to read at sight ordinary prose, to gain some acquaintance with 
the literature of the nineteenth century, and to facilitate the study later 
on of the Spanish classics. Collateral reading will be assigned. Open 
to students who have taken Courses 1, 2, or an equivalent. Three 
hours a week. 



For undergraduates and graduates 

51, 52. Spanish Classics. — In this course ithe first part of Cervantes' 
Don Quijote will be read entire. Selections from the works of Lope 
de Vega and Calderon will also be studied. About 1000 pages of 
collateral reading will be assigned. Open to students who have taken 
Courses 5, 6, or an equivalent. Three hours a week. 

IS6 



Spanish and Italian 

Italian 

For undergraduates only 

i, 2. Italian for Beginners. — This is a course in Italian grammar, 
reading, and composition designed for those who wish to begin as 
soon as practicable the study of the Italian classics. During the 
spring semester collateral reading will be assigned. Three hours a week. 

For undergraduates and graduates 

51. Carducci. — In this course will be included selections from the 
prose writings as well as from the poetry of Carducci. The structure 
of Italian verse will be considered. The course is intended to serve as 
an introduction to the study of the works of Dante taken up :n 
Course 52. Collateral reading will be assigned. Open to students who 
have taken Courses 1, 2, or an equivalent. Three hours a week. 

52. Dante. — In this course the Vita nuova and the Inferno will be 
read entire. Collateral reading will be assigned. Open to students 
who have taken Course 51, or an equivalent. Three hours a week. 



157 



College of Law 



COLLEGE OF LAW 



FACULTY OF INSTRUCTION 

WILLIAM EMANUEL WALZ, A. M., LL. B., Litt. D. 

Deax Professor of Law 

EDGAR MYRICK SIMPSON, A. B. Professor of Law 

GEORGE HEXRY WORSTER, LL. M. Associate Professor of Law 
BARTLETT BROOKS, A. B., LL. B., Assistant Professor of Law 
LUCILIUS ALOXZO EMERY, A. M, LL. D., Justice and Chief Jus- 
tice of Supreme Judicial Court of Maine 1883-1911 

Lecturer on Roman Law and Probate Law 
LOUIS CARVER SOUTHARD, M. S., LL. D., Member of the Massa- 
chusetts Bar and of the United States Supreme Cour: Bar 

Lecturer on Medico-Legal Relations 
EDWARD HARWARD BLAKE, LL. B., LL. D. 

Lecturer on Admiralty Law 
ISAAC WATSON DYER, A. B. 

Lecturer on Federal Jurisdiction and Procedure, and on Private 
Corporations 
JOHN ROGERS MASON, A. M, LL. B. Lecturer on Bankruptcy Law 
WILLIAM BRIDGHAM PEIRCE, B. M. E. 

Resident Lecturer on Common Law Pleading and Maine Practice 
HENRY BURT MONTAGUE, LL. M. 

Lecturer on Practice and History of Law 



General Information 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The College of Law was opened to students in 1898. It occupies the 
Isaac H. Merrill building, now Stewart Hall, purchased by the Univer- 
sity in 191 1, corner Union and Second Streets, Bangor. In this city are 
held annually one term of the U. S. District Court, five terms of the 
Maine Supreme Judicial Court, one term of the Law Court, and daily 
sessions of the Municipal Court. The law library contains over 4,500 
volumes, including the reports of the Federal Courts, and of the Su- 
preme Courts of the United States, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, 
Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and Ohio; the Court of 
appeals of New York; the New York Common Law and Chancery 
Reports; the American Decisions, American Reports, and American 
State Reports ; the complete National Reporter System ; the Lawyers' 
Reports Annotated; the English Reports, full verbatim reprint; the 
English Ruling cases; and the American Digest; all the important 
law Encyclopedias; and a considerable number of text-books. 

Advanced Standing 

A student entering from any law school having equal admission 
requirements is admitted to advanced standing and given full credit 
for work done in the school from which he comes, upon presenting cer- 
tificates of proficiency from its executive head. All other persons seek- 
ing advanced standing as regular students must have the necessary 
educational qualifications required for admission and must pass exami- 
nations in the subjects covered in the earlier part of the curriculum. 

Members of the Bar of any state may be admitted to the senior class 
in the fall semester as candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Laws on 
presentation of their certificates of admission to the Bar; graduate 
students, as well as members of the Bar having this degree, may take 
the graduate courses leading to the degree of Master of Laws. 

Methods of Instruction 

The college is not committed exclusively to any one method of 
instruction, but the case system is consistently used in all the subjects 
of the law for which good case-books have been provided, and the great 
cases of the law, the land marks of legal development, form the basis 
of the recitations. The College of Law recognizes the great value of lec- 
tures by able men, and the profit to be found in the use of standard 

iS9 



College of Law 

text-books; but the greatest stress is placed upon the study of selected 
cases, and most of the work is carried on in this way. It is believed that 
thru the case the student can best come at the controlling principles 
of the law, and that in no other way can he get so vital a comprehension 
of them. "Through the case to the principle" may, perhaps, adequately 
indicate the stand-point of the college in the matter of method. 

Particular stress is placed upon the practice court, which is held 
once a week as a part of the work of the college, and in which every 
student is required to appear regularly. The questions of law are in 
all instances made to ar ; se from the pleadings prepared by the students, 
and briefs summarizing the points involved and the authorities cited 
ar^ submitted to the presiding judge. 

Curriculum 

The curriculum covers three years, in accordance with the require- 
ments for admission to the bar in the State of Maine. College gradu- 
ates of unusual ability are permitted to arrange their work so as to 
complete the course in two years, provided they maintain an average of 
eighty percent, or above. The three years curriculum is, however, 
recommended in all cases. 

Courses designated by an odd number are given in the fall semester; 
those designated by an even number in the spring semester. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

2. Admiralty. — A course of lectures. One hour a week. Mr. Blake. 
4. Agency. — *Two hours a week. Associate Professor Worster. 
1. Bankruptcy. — Lectures. \One hour a week. Mr. Mason. 



*The subjects starred are given in alternate years. Agency alternat- 
ing with Insurance, Sales with Suretyship, Damages with Municipal 
Corporations, Real Property (cases) with Conflict of Laws. 

tAdmiralty, Bankruptcy, Executors and Administrators, History of 
Law, and International Law are given once in two years. 

JRoman Law, Probate Law, and "What to do in Court and How," 
are given about once in three years. 

All courses given are required of candidates for the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws. 

160 



Courses of Instruction 

3. Brief Making and the Use of Law Books. — One hour a week. 
Professor Walz. 

5. Carriers. — Three hours a week. Professor Simpson. 

7, 8. Common Law Pleadings. — Lectures. One hour a week. Mn 
Feirce. 

10. Conflict of Laws. — *Three hours a week. Professor Simpson, 

12. Constitutional Law. — Two hours a week. Associate Professor 
Worster. 

53, 54- Contracts. — Three hours a week. Assistant Professor 
Brooks. 

11. Criminal Law. — One hour a week. Professor Simpson. 

16. Criminal Law. — Two hours a week. Professor Simpson. 

13. Damages. — *Two hours a week. Associate Professor Worster. 
15. Domestic Relations. — Two hours a week. Professor Simpson. 

17. Equity Jurisprudence. — Three hours a week. Professor 
Walz. 

18. Equity Jurisprudence. — Two hours a week. Professor Walz. 

19. Evidence. — Three hours a week. Professor Simpson. 

20. Equity Pleading. — Two hours a week. Assistant Professob 
Brooks. 

22. Evidence. — Two hours a week. Professor Simpson. 

24. Executors and Administrators. — f Lectures. One hour a week. 
Professor Simpson. 



161 
11 



College of Law 
26. Federal Courts. — Lectures. One hour a week. Professor Walz. 
23. Federal Jurisdiction and Procedure. — Lectures. Mr. Dyer. 
21. General Review. — One hour a week. Professor Walz. 

55. General Review. — One hour a week. Professor Walz. 

28. History of Law. — fLectures. One hour a week. Professor 
Walz. 

56. Insurance. — *Two hours a week. Associate Professor Wors- 
ter. 

30. International Law. — fLectures. One hour a week. Professor 
Walz. 

31. Legal Ethics. — One hour a week. Professor Walz. 

34. Maine Practice. — Lectures. One hour a week. Mr. Peirce. 

58. Medico-Legal Relations. — Lectures. About six hours. Mr. 
Southard. 

57. Municipal Corporations. — *Two hours a week. Professor 
Walz. 

35. Negotiable Paper. — One hour a week. Assistant Professor 
Rrooks. 

60. Negotiable Paper. — Two hours a week. Assistant Professor 
Brooks. 

36. Partnership. — Two hours a week. Professor Walz. 

33. Practice and History of Law. — Lectures. Mr. Montague. 

37. 38. Private Corporations. — Two hours a week. Associate 
Professor Worster. 



162 



Courses of Instruction 

39. Private Corporations. — Lectures. Mr. Dyer. 

40. Probate Law and Practice. — Lectures, f About ten hours. Ex- 
Chief Justice Emery. 

41. Real Property. — Three hours a week. Professor Simpson. 

42. Real Property. — Two hours a week. Professor Simpson. 

44. Real Property Cases. — *Three hours a week. Professor 
Simpson. 

46. Roman Law. — Lectures, t About ten hours. Ex-Chief Justice 
Emery. 

45. Sales. — *Threc hours a week. Associate Professor Worster. 

47. Suretyship. — *Threc hours a week. Associate Professor 
Worster. 

48. What to do in Court. — Lectures, t About ten hours. Ex-Chief 
Justice Emery. 

49. 50. Torts. — Three hours a week. Professor Walz. 

52. Wills. — Two hours a week. Associate Professor Worster. 



t6^ 



College of Technology 



COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 



FACULTY OF INSTRUCTION 

HAROLD SHERBURNE BOARDMAN, C. E. 

Professor of Civil Engineering 
Dean 
CHARLES PARTRIDGE WESTON, C. E., M. A. 

Professor of Mechanics and Drawing 
CHARLES BARTO BROWN, C. E. 

Professor of Railroad Engineering 
RALPH HARPER McKEE, Ph. D. Professor of Chemistry 

WILLIAM EDWARD BARROWS, E. E. 

Professor of Electrical Engineering 
WILLIAM JORDAN SWEETSER, S. B. 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
CHARLES WILSON EASLEY, Ph. D. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 
ALBERT THEODORE CHILDS, E. E. 

Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 
ARCHER LEWIS GROVER, B. S. Associate Professor of Drawing 
WILLIAM AMBROSE JARRETT, Pharm. D. Professor of Pharmacy 
JULIUS ERNEST KAULFUSS, B. S. 

Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
CARL HENRY LEKBERG, B. S. 

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
EMBERT HIRAM SPRAGUE, B. S. 

Acting Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
LLOYD MEEKS BURGHART, M. A. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
RAYMOND HARMON ASHLEY, Ph. D. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

164 



General Information 

ALBERT GUY DURGIN, M. S. Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

ALPHEUS CROSBY LYON, B. S. 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 
JOSEPH NEWELL STEPHENSON, M. S. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
EVERETT WILLARD DAVEE Instructor in Wood and Iron Work 
CHARLES JENKINS CARTER Instructor in Machine Tool Work 
WALTER ELWOOD FARNHAM Instructor in Drawing 

ERNEST CONANT CHESWELL Instructor in Electrical Engineering 
ELWOOD WHITNEY JENNISON, B. S. 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering 
TIMOTHY JEREMIAH CONNORS, Jr., Pharm. D. 

Instructor in Pharmacy 
JAMES JOHN DONEGAN, Ph. B. Instructor in Civil Engineering 
WILLIAM GORDON JAMES, B. S. 

Instructor in Electrical Engineering 
ARTHUR WHITING LEIGHTON Instructor in Drawing 

HARRY GILBERT MITCHELL, B. S., A. M. 

Instructor in Chemistry 
ROLAND LEGARD DAVIS, B. S. Instructor in Civil Engineering 

CHESTER HAMLIN GOLDSMITH, B. S. Instructor in Chemistry 
FREDERICK WILLIAM LANE, S. B. Instructor in Chemistry 

ELMER LELAND PARTRIDGE, B. S. 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The College of Technology provides technical instruction in chemis- 
try, in various branches of engineering, and in pharmacy. The num- 
ber of hours required for graduation in this college is one hundred and 
fifty. In such technical curricula it is necessary to prescribe a large 
proportion of the work; but some elective studies may be chosen ir 
the junior and senior years. Under each of the curricula described 
below is given a tabulated statement of the subjects pursued and the 
amount of work required. The college comprises : 

Chemical Engineering Curriculum 

Chemistry Curriculum 

Civil Engineering Curriculum 

Electrical Engineering Curriculum 

Mechanical Engineering Curriculum 

Pharmacy Curricula 

165 



College of Technology 

At graduation in any of these curricula the student receives the degree 
of Bachelor of Science ; except for the short curricula in Pharmacy 
where the degrees of Graduate in Pharmacy or Pharmaceutical Chem- 
ist are conferred. The diploma indicates which curriculum has been 
completed. 

MAINE TECHNOLOGY EXPERIMENT STATION 

By action of the Board of Trustees, June, 1915, the establishment of 
a Maine Technology Experiment Station was authorized. This station 
will be under the direct control of the President of the University, the 
Dean of the College of Technology, and the heads of the departments of 
Chemistry and Engineering. The Station will carry on practical re- 
search in engineering subjects, make investigations for State boards and 
municipal authorities, furnish scientific information to the industries of 
thf State, and distribute accurate scientific knowledge to the people. A 
four-page bulletin will be issued monthly during the college year. 

Chemical Engineering Curriculum 

In view of the rapid development of the application of chemistry in 
manufacturing, this curriculum is offered to furnish training in engi- 
neering together with specialization in chemistry. The first two years 
are almost identical with those under the Chemistry curriculum, but in 
the junior and senior years the student takes the fundamental courses 
in mechanical and electrical engineering, where, in the Chemistry curricu- 
lum, the student takes subjects having a biological aspect. The training 
is thus essentially chemical, and the graduates are primarily chemists 
having a good knowledge of mechanical and electrical engineering. 
Such students will be prepared to enter the profession of chemical 
engineering and to occupy positions in manufacturing establishments 
such as metallurgical works, bleacheries, dye houses, chemical plants, 
gas works, sugar refineries, pulp and paper mills, etc. 



166 



The College Curricula 



Option I. Regular Curriculum 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



/ ; (/// Semester 
Subject Hours 

Chemistry I or 3 2 

Chemistry 5, t4 2 

Drawing 3, *6 2 

English 5 3 

German 1 or French 3 3 

Mathematics 1 &3 5 

Military 1, *3 1 



Spring Semester 
Subject Hours 

Chemistry 2 or 4 3 

Chemistry 6, t4 2 

Drawing 2, *6 2 

English 6 3 

German 2 or French 4 2 

Mathematics 6 5 

Military 1, *3 1 



Physical training *2 h Physical training *2 1 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Chemistry 11, fio 5 Chemistry 60, tio 5 



English 3 I 

Mathematics 13 3 

Mechanical Engineering 3, *4 il 

Military 1, *3 1 

Modern language 3 

Physics 1 -j 



Chemistry 52, 3 and t4 5 

English 4 i 

Military 1, *3 ... 1 

Modern language 2 

Physics 2 3 

Physics 4, $5 2 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Chemistry 53 3 

Chemistry 63, t8 4 

Chemistry 71 3 

Chemistry 17, f4 2 

Chemistry 75 2 

Mechanical Engineering 75, ?3 ii Mechanical Engineering 14 

Physics 53, $7! 3 Electrical Engineering 30 



Chemistry 72 2 

Chemistry 64, t4 2 

Chemistry 66, t4 2 

Chemistry 74, f6 3 

Chemistry 96, t4 2 

3 
2 



Elective 2 



167 



College of Technology 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Subject Hours 

Chemistry 77 3 

Chemistry 101 3 

Chemistry 57, t6 3 

Chemistry 105 

or 
Geology 3 

Electrical Engineering 35 ... . 2 

Electrical Engineering 33 t4. . 2 

English 15 2 

English 29 2 

Elective 1 



Spring Semester 
Subject Hours 

Chemistry 98, f 10 5 

Chemistry 94 1 

Chemistry 76 2 

Chemistry 104, f8 4 

Elective 5 



Option II. Pulp and Paper Curriculum 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Chemistry 1 or 3 2 

Chemistry 5, t4 2 

Drawing 3, *6 2 

English 5 3 

German 1 or French 3 3 

Mathematics 1&3 5 

Military 1, *3 1 



Chemistry 2 or 4 3 

Chemistry 6, t4 2 

Drawing 2, *6 2 

English 6 3 

German 2 or French 4 ^ 

Mathematics 6 5 

Military I, *3 1 



Physical training *2 1 Physical training *2 1 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Chemistry 11, tio 5 

English 3 1 

Mathematics 13 3 

Biology 17, t2 1 

Chemistry 17, t4 2 

Military I, *3 I 

Modern language 3 

Physics 1 5 



Chemistry 60, f 10 5 

Chemistry 52, 3 and f4 5 

English 4 1 

Modern language 2 

Physics 2 3 

Physics 4, $5 2 

Chemistry 44 2 

Military 1 



i?8 



The College Curricula 



JUNIOR YEAR 



FaH Semester 
Subject Hours 

Chemistry 83, t4 2 

Chemistry 53 3 

Chemistry 55. t4 2 

Chemistry 71 3 

Chemistry 81 2 

Chemistry 27 1 

Mechanics 11 3 

Civil Engineering 33 1 

German is 2 

Forestry 9 1 



Spring Semester. 
Subject Hours 

( hemistry 72 2 

Chemistry 82, f4 2 

Ch r m : stry 66, t4 2 

Chemistry 74, f6 3 

Chemistry 84 2 

Electrical Engineering 30 2 

Forestry 2 2 

Elective 2 



SENIOR YEAR 



' hemistry 98, f 10 5 

Chemistry 86, t2 1 

Chemistry 88 2 

Mechanical Engineering 14 . . 2 

Mechanical Engineering 94 . . . ii 

Economics 6 3 

Elective 3 



Chemistry 77 3 

Chemis'ry Pp. t4 2 

Chemistry 87, ^4 2 

Chemistry 93 I 

Electrical Frr ineering 35 2 

Electrical Engineering 33, t4 2 

English 15 2 

Civil Engineering 35 2 

Mechanical r ngineering 99 . . . 2 

At graduation the student receives the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Upon the completion of one year's prescribed work in residence, includ- 
ing the presentation of a satisfactory thesis, he receives the degree of 
Master of Science. Three years after graduation, upon the presenta- 
tion of a satisfactory thesis and proofs of professional work, he may 
receive the degree of Chemical Engineer. 

Chemistry Curriculum 

This curriculum is designed to give the student not only a thorough 
technical training, but also a breadth of education which will enable 
him readily to undertake the great variety of problems which naturally 
present themselves to a chemist. It differs from the Chemical Engi- 
neering curriculum in that in the last two years the student takes 
courses having a biological aspect (bacteriology, biological chemistry, 
and agricultural analysis) rather than those of an engineering type. 

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College of Technology 

The curriculum is a broad one and, when completed, it prepares the 
student to teach, or for the profession of chemist in experiment sta- 
tions, food laboratories, chemical fertilizer and tanning plants ; metal- 
lurgical, rubber and electrical machinery manufactories ; and the gen- 
eral consulting and analytical work of a professional chemist. 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Subject Hours 

Chemistry I or 3 2 

Chemistry 5, t4 2 

Drawing 1, *6 2 

English 5 .3 

French 3 or German 1 3 

Mathematics 1&3 5 

Military 1, *3 I 

Physical training *2 a 



Spring Semester 
Subject Hours 

Chemistry 2 or 4 3 

Chemistry 6, f4 2 

Drawing 2, *6 2 

English 6 3 

French 4 or German 2 2 

Mathematics 6 5 

Military 1, *3 1 

Physical training *2 1 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Chemistry n, fio 5 

Chemistry 17, f 4 2 

English 3 1 

Mathematics 13 3 

Modern language 3 

Military 1, *3 1 

Physics 1 5 



Chemistry 60, f 10 5 

Chemistry 52, 3 and t4 5 

English 4 1 

Modern language 2 

1 

3 



Military 1, *; 
Physics 2 . . 
Physics 4, $5 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Biological Chemistry 1 5 

Chemistry 53 3 

Chemistry 71 3 

Chemistry 75 2 

Chemistry 63, f 8 4 

Modern language 3 



Agricultural Chemistry 4, fio 5 

Bacteriology 1, f6 3 

Chenrstry 74, f6 3 

Chemistry 72 2 

Modern language 2 

Elective f 



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The College Curricula 

SENIOR YEAR 

/ ; (/// Semester Spring Semester 

Subject Hours Subject Hours 

Chemistry 57, t6 3 Chemistry 98, f 10 5 

Chemistry 101 3 Chemistry 76 2 

Chemistry JJ 2 Chemistry 94 \ 

Chemistry 61, f4 2 Chemistry 104, t8 \ 

Chemistry 105 or Geology 3 . . 2 Elective 5 

English 15 2 

Elective 3 

Civil Engineering Curriculum 

The object of the curriculum in Civil Engineering is to give the 
student as thorough a knowledge as possible of the principles underly- 
ing the profession. The attempt is made to give the student not only a 
technical education, but to form the basis for a liberal one as well. 

The endeavor is made to impress upon the mind of the student that 
the granting of his bachelor's degree does not make him an engineer. 
It simply indicates that he has received the mental technical training 
which will fit him to follow the profession, and that he must begin at 
the bottom of the ladder of practice in order to obtain experience and 
judgment, without which he can never become successful. 

The methods of instruction are recitations, lectures, original prob- 
lems, work in the testing laboratories, field practice, and designing. 
Effort is made to acquaint the student with the best engineering practice 
and with the standard engineering literature. 

The work of the first year is the same for all engineering students, 
especial attention being paid to mathematics and English. The technical 
work begins in the fall semester of the second year with field work 
and the study of surveying. This technical work is gradually increased, 
until the last year when it is nearly all professional. At the beginning 
of the fourth year an opportunity is offered to specialize slightly along 
one of three lines. The first, called Option 1, consists of work in 
hydraulic engineering and electrical transmission, the second, Option 2, 
consists of work in railroad engineering, while Option 3 consists of work 
in highway engineering. 

The following outline constitutes the regular four years' curriculum. 
Certain general subjects which are given as requirements may, on pre- 
sentation of reasons satisfactory to the head of the department, he 
omitted and others substituted. 

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FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Subject Hours 

Chemistry i or 3 2 

Chemistry 5, t4 2 

Drawing i, *6 2 

English 5 3 

Mathematics 1 and 3 5 

Military 1, *3 1 

Modern language 3 

Physical training *2 1 



Spring Semester 
Subject Hours 

Chemistry 2 or 4 3 

Chemistry 6, t4 2 

Drawing 2, *6 2 

English 6 3 

Mathematics 8 5 

Military 1, *3 1 

Modern language 2 

Physical training *2 1 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Civil Engineering 1, 5 2k Civil Engineering 2, 4 2 



Drawing 3, *6 2 

English 3 1 

Mathematics 7 5 

Military 1, *3 1 

Modern language 3 

Physics 1 5 



Civil Engineering 6, 8 3 

Drawing 4, *6 2 

English 4 1 

Mathematics 8 5 

Military 1, *3 1 

Modern language 2 

Physics 2 3 

Physics 4, $5 2 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Civil Engineering 25 2 

Civil Engineering 21, 23, *6 . . 2 

Civil Engineering 29 2 

Economics lb 2 

Geology 6 2 

M echanics 51 5 

Mathematics 57 3 

Physics 51, $2! 1 



Civil Engineering 20 2 

Civil Engineering 22 2 

Civil Engineering 26 3 

Civil Engineering 28 3 

Economics 2b 2 

Mechanics 52 5 

Mechanical Engineering 74, f2 1 

*Civil Engineering 24 2 

*Taken after Commencement 



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The College Curricula 



SENIOR 

Fall Semester 

Subject Hours 

Civil Engineering 57 3 

Civil Engineering 67 1 

Civil Engineering 59, 1 c, 4J 
Civil Engineering 55 and 51 

(Option 1) 4 

Civil Engineering 63 and 53 

(Option 2) 4 

Civil Engineering * 69 and 53 

(Option 3) 4 

History 5 2 

English 15 or 31 2 



YEAR 

Spring Semester 
Subject Hours 

Civil Engineering 58 3 

Civil Engineering 60 2 

Civil Engineering 62, f6 3 

Civil Engineering 52 and Elec- 
trical Engineering 42 (Op- 
tion 1) 5 

Civil Engineering 72 and 74 

(Option 3) ;.. 5 

Civil Engineering 70, t2 . . . . 1 

Economics 6 3 



Electrical Engineering Curriculum 

This curriculum is intended to provide the student with a thoro under- 
standing of the underlying principles of electrical engineering and to 
develop an ability to solve problems of an engineering nature from 
commercial as well as technical premises. To accomplish this, the 
student first studies the various electrical laws and methods of electrical 
measurements and correlates them with various laws previously assimi- 
lated in the study of physics and mathematics. These studies are fol- 
lowed by more advanced courses involving the fundamental electrical 
laws and theories and showing their application to the design, operation, 
and performance of electrical apparatus such as is used in the generation 
of electrical energy or in transforming electrical energy into mechanical 
energy for the various commercial requirements. 

It is the endeavor of the curriculum to acquaint the student with con- 
temporary engineering practice and, by persistent association of abstract 
analysis with practical problems, to equip him with the fundamentals oi 
a successful career Stress is laid upon the systematic reading of tech- 
nical periodicals and the acquirement of a reference library. Effort is 
made to have lectures by active engineers and alumni following their 
profession, thus bringing the student into more intimate contact with 
the engineering world. 

In addition to the purely electrical subjects, the student takes the 
customary work in mathematics, physics, mechanics, shop, drawing, and 
allied engineering courses, together with the cultural subjects enumer- 
ated below. 



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College of Technology 

Requirements for Graduation 
freshman year 



Fall Semester 
Subject Hours 

Chemistry i or 3 2 

Chemistry 5, t4 2 

Drawing 1, *6 2 

English 5 3 

Mathematics 1 &3 5 

Military 1, *3 1 

Modern language 3 



Spring Semester 
Subject Hours 

Chemistry 2 3 

Chemistry 6, t4 2 

Drawing 2, *6 2 

English 6 3 

Mathematics 6 5 

Military 1, *3 1 

Modern language 2 



Physical training *2 1 Physical training *2 1 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Electrical Engineering 1 2 

English 3 1 

Modern language 3 

Mathematics 7 5 

Physics 1 5 

Drawing 3, *6 2 

Military I, *3 1 



Electrical Engineering 2 2 

English 4 1 

Modern Language 2 

Mathematics 8 5 

Physics 2 3 

Physics Laboratory 4, $5 2 

Mechanical Eng. 56 3 

Drawing 4, *6 2 

Military 1, *3 1 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Electrical Engineering 5 3 Electrical Engineering 50 3 

Mechanics 51 5 Electrical Engineering 8. *4 . . 2 

Mechanical Engineering 7, *4 ih Mechanics 52 5 



Economics lb 2 

Civil Engineering 3 2 



Physics 53, *7i 
Elective 



Electrical Engineering 8, *4 . . 2 
Economics 2b 2 



Civil Engineering 4, *6 a Mechanical Engineering 66 



Mechanical Engineering 80 



174 



The College Curricula 



SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Subject Hours Subject Hours 

Electrical Engineering 51 ... 3 Electrical Engineering 52 . . . 2! 

Electrical Engineering 53 . . . 2 Electrical Engineering 54 . . . 1 

Electrical Engineering 55, f 4 . . 2 Electrical Engineering 56 . . . 2I 

Electrical Engineering 75, *4. . ll Electrical Engineering 58 ... 2 

Civil Engineering 33 t Electrical Engineering 76, t4 . . 2 

Civil Engineering 35 2 Economics 6 3 

Mechanical Engineering 83 . . . 3 Elective 2 

Mechanical Engineering JJ, is \\ 

Elective 2 

Mechanical Engineering Curriculum 

The field of the mechanical engineer embraces all work involving the 
design, construction, or installation of machinery, either for manufac- 
turing, transportation, or power generation ; the design, manufacture, 
and installation of heating and ventilating or refrigerating equipment ; 
the superintendence or management of factories, power plants, and 
motive power; the equipment of railways, and similar work. 

The Mechanical Engineering curriculum is arranged to fit men as 
well as possible in four years' time to enter any of these lines of work. 

It is not possible to develop the student into an expert engineer in any 
branch of the profession. It is also not possible, in general, to foresee 
what will be his ultimate occupation. Accordingly, those subjects which 
are fundamental to all engineering work and which may best be learned 
in college are most emphasized in the required courses while those sub- 
jects which are best acquired in practical work are left for the engineer 
graduate to obtain in actual practice. An endeavor is made, however, to 
give the more advanced technical courses such a trend as to make the 
period of adjustment of the graduate to practical engineering conditions 
short and his acquirement of the knowledge necessary for advancement 
rapid. 

The theoretical work is taught mainly by recitations, based upon care- 
fully chosen texts which are supplemented or brought down to date, 
where necessary, by explanations or illustrative examples on the part of 
the instructor. Numerous problems are assigned for work outside the 
class-room to make sure the student can apply the principles learned. 

Courses in the shops and laboratories illustrate the application of 
matter learned in the recitation work, and also teach methods of con- 

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College of Technology 

struction, operation, and testing of apparatus by direct contact with It. 
In the drawing rooms, application of theories to work in design is taught, 
together with methods and requirements for the production of neat and 
accurate engineering drawings. 

Thoro instruction is given in the theory and operation of both direct 
and alternating current electrical machinery, with ample practice in the 
electrical laboratory. Sufficient time is devoted to recitation and field 
work in surveying to give familiarity with instruments and methods. 
Lectures by practical engineers and trips of inspection to engineering 
works help to bring before the student the conditions existing in prac- 
tice. 

Requirements for Graduation 

freshman year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Subject Hours Subject Hours 

Chemistry I or 3 2 Chemistry 2 .•. 3 

Chemistry 5, t4 2 Chemistry 6, t4 * 2 

Drawing 1, *6 2 Drawing 2, *6 2 

English 3 3 English 6 3 

Mathematics 1&3 5 Mathematics 6 5 

Military 1, *3 1 Military 1, *3 1 

Modern language 3 Modern language 2 

Physical training *2 h Physical training *2 1 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Subject Hours 

Drawing 3, *6 2 

English 3 1 

Mathematics 7 5 

Mechanical Engineering 1, *6 2 

Military I, *3 1 

Modern language 3 

Physics 1 5 



Subject Hours 

Drawing 4, *6 2 

English 4 1 

Mathematics 8 5 

Mechanical Engineering 6, *4 T * 

Mechanical Engineering 56 . . . 3 

Military I, *3 I 

Modern Language 2 

Physics 2 3 

Physics 4, $5 2 



176 



The College Curricula 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Subject Hours Subject Hours 

Mechanical Engineering 57 . . . 1 Mechanical Engineering 8, *6. . 2 

Mechanical Engineering 7, *6.. 2 Mechanical Engineering 66 . . . 3 

Mechanical Engineering 61 . . . 2 Mechanical Engineering 80 . . . 3 

Mechanical Engineering 59, *4 ii Mechanical Engineering 70, f2 1 

Civil Engineering 3 2 Mechanical Engineering 64b, *3 1 

Civil Engineering 5 2 Electrical Engineering 30 ... . 2 

Mechanics 51 5 Mechanical Engineering 64a . . 1 

Physics 51, $5 2 Mechanics 52 5 

Economics ia 2 

Physics 65 i 



SENIOR YEAR 



Mechanical Engineering 83 . . . 3 

Mechanical Engineering 89, *3 1 

Mechanical Engineering 71, f4 2 

Mechanical Engineering 67, *6 2 

Civil Engineering S3 l 

Civil Engineering 35 2 

Electrical Engineering 31 2 

Electrical Engineering ss, t4 . . 2 

Mechanical Engineering 91 . . . 1 

Mechanical Engineering 99 . . . 2 

English 2 



ts 



Mechanical Engineering 68 
Mechanical Engineering 72, 
Mechanical Engineering 84 . . . 
Mechanical Engineering 88, *6 
^Mechanical Engineering 94 . . 

^Economics 60 3 

Electrical Engineering 32 2 

Electrical Engineering 34, f2. . 1 

Seminar 1 

Thesis , 



^Substitution may be offered for this course if approved by the major 
instructor. 

Pharmacy Curricula 

The department of Pharmacy offers two curricula, one of four 
years and one of two years. 

The four years curriculum is offered in response to a demand for a 
combined collegiate and technical -training for those who design to prac- 
tice pharmacy. It aims therefore to combine general culture studies 
with a training in those sciences fundamental to technical pharmacy, 
to the end that the pharmacist may be equipped culturally and techni- 



177 



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College of Technology 

cally to fulfil the increased demands and responsibilities of his exacting 
calling. Hence, this curriculum includes the appropriate sciences and 
laboratory courses, it also includes cultural courses in modern languages, 
history, philosophy, and economics. While in the latter three subjects* 
particular courses are not specified, a minimum number and proper 
sequence of such courses are required. 

Those who intend to prepare for pharmaceutical work are urged to 
consider carefully the superior advantages of this curriculum. The 
increasing importance of the chemical, biological, and sanitary sciences, 
and of the pharmacist's relation to them, emphasized by the era of food 
and drug legislation now upon us, points out at once the path of new 
duty and of enlarged opportunity to those fitted to enter. To the unfit, 
the new duty remains, without the enlarged opportunity. 

Instruction in pharmaceutical studies is given by lectures, recitations, 
and tests, supplemented by work in the laboratories of chemistry, biol- 
ogy, and pharmacy. Thirty credits are required for graduation. 

The library contains valuable reference literature in chemistry, phar- 
macy, and allied sciences, and the leading scientific and technical jour- 
nals. 

Requirements for Graduation, Four Years Curriculum 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Subject Hours 

Chemistry I or 2 2 

Chemistry 3, t4 2 

English 5 4 

French 3 or German 2 2 

Mathematics 1 & 3 5 

Military 1, *3 1 

Physical training *2 I 



Spring Semester 
Subj ect Hours 

Chemistry 2 3 

Chemistry 6, t4 ■ 2 

English 6 4 

French 4 or German lb 2 

Mathematics 2 3 

Military 1, *3 1 

Physical training *2 1 

Mathematics 12 2 



178 



The College Curricula 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Subject Hours 

Biology i 4 

Chemistry II, fio 5 

English 3 i 

Military 2, *3 I 

Modern language 3 

Physics I 5 



Spring Semester 
Subject Hours 

Biology 2 \ 

Chemistry 52 5 

English 4 1 

Military 2, *3 1 

Modern language 2 

Physics 2 3 

Physics 4, $5 2 



Biological chemistry 1 5 

Biology 15 3 

Chemistry 53 3 

Pharmacy 13 3 

Pharmacy 7 3 

Pharmacy 9 3 



JUNIOR YEAR 

. 5 Bacteriology 1, t6 



Chemistry 60 tio 5 

Laboratory biological chem- 
istry 2, f4 2 

Pharmacy 2 4 

Pharmacy 16, t8 4 

Pharmacy 4 2 



SENIOR YEAR 



Pharmacy 54 1 

Pharmacy 14 5 

Pharmacy 18, f 12 6 

Pharmacy 20 3 

Pharmacy 58 2 

Pharmacy 22, f 4 2 



Pharmacy 11 2 

Pharmacy 17, t8 4 

Chemistry 61, t4 2 

Pharmacy 3 3 

Elective 3 

Chemistry 41, t8 4 

Pharmacy 51 2 

From courses in history, philosophy, and economics, a total of at 
least five hours must be chosen. 

At graduation the student receives the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Upon the completion of one additional year's prescribed work in resi- 
dence, including the presentation of a satisfactory thesis, he receives 
the degree of Master of Science. 

Two Years Curriculum 

This curriculum is designed for those who, for lack of time or for 
other reasons, are unable to take the curriculum of four years. The 
more general educational studies of the full curriculum are omitted, 



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College of Technology 

but as broad a range of subjects is offered as can be undertaken without 
sacrifice of thoroness in the technical work. The curriculum corre- 
sponds, in general, to the usual full curriculum of pharmacy colleges. 
The work required of the student will occupy his whole time during 
the college year of nine months, and will usually exclude work in drug 
stores during term time. The brevity of this curriculum does not war- 
rant extending to other than advanced students the privilege of electives. 



FIRST YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Subject Hours 

Chemistry I or 3 2 

Chemistry 11, fi6 8 

Pharmacy 13 3 

Pharmacy 7 3 

Pharmacy 9 3 

Pharmacy 11 2 



Spring Semester 
Subject Hours 

Botany 14 3 

Chemistry 2 3 

Chemistry 52 5 

Pharmacy 16, f8 4 

Pharmacy 2 4 

Pharmacy 4 2 



SECOND YEAR 



Chemistry 53 3 

Pharmaceutical histology 15... 3 

Pharmacy 3 3 

Pharmacy 17, f8 4 

Chemistry 41, f8 4 



Pharmacy 54 1 

Pharmacy 18, f 12 6 

Pharmacy 14 5 

Pharmacy 58 2 

Pharmacy 20 3 



180 



Chemistry 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



Note: A star (*) before the time designated for a course indicates 
that three hours of actual work are required to obtain credit for one 
hour; a dagger (f) indicates that two hours are required; a double 
dagger ($) indicates that two and one-half hours are required. 

Courses designated by an odd number are given in the fall semester; 
those designated by an even number, in the spring semester. 

CHEMISTRY 

Professor McKee; Associate Professor Easley; Assistant Professor 
Burghart ; Assistant Professor Durgin ; Assistant Professor 
Ashley; Assistant Professor Stephenson; Mr. Mitchell; Mr. 
Goldsmith ; Mr. Lane 

For undergraduates only 

1. General Chemistry. — This course deals with the general prin- 
ciples of the science. Lectures and recitations. Open to students who 
have taken chemistry in preparatory school. Two hours a week. To 
be accompanied by Course 5. Courses 1, 2, 5, and 6; or 3, 4, 5, and 6 
constitute the first year's work in chemistry. 

2. General Chemistry. — This course is a continuation of Course 1. 
It is mainly devoted to a study of the metallic elements, their classifica- 
tion, compounds, and chemical properties. Lectures and recitations. 
Three hours a week. To be accompanied by Course 6. 

3. General Chemistry. — A course similar to 1 for those who have 
had no previous work in chemistry. Two hours a week. To be accom- 
panied by Course 5. 

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College of Technology 

4. General Chemistry. — A course similar to 2 but in continuation 
of 1 for those who did not take chemistry in the preparatory school. 
Three hours a week. To be accompanied by Course 6. 

5. Laboratory Chemistry. — Laboratory work to accompany Course 
1 or Course 3. "\Four hours a week. 

6. Laboratory Chemistry. — A continuation of Course 5 to accom- 
pany Course 2, or Course 4. Wour hours a week. 

11. Qualitative Analysis. — This course includes the general reac- 
tions of the metals and acids with their qualitative separation. The 
subject is studied from the standpoint of the law of mass action and 
the ionic theory. t7V» to t sixteen hours a week. 

15. Organic Chemistry. — An elementary one semester course in 
organic chemistry. Required of sophomores majoring in Agriculture. 
Two hours class room and "\two hours laboratory work a week. 

16. Organic Chemistry. — An elementary course giving in one sem- 
ester a rapid view of the subject. Students who have sufficient time 
available are advised to take Courses 52 and 53 instead of this course, 
or Course 15. No prerequisite other than general chemistry. Three 
hours class room and \four hours laboratory work a week. 

17. Gas and Fuel Analysis. — The work consists in the analysis of 
fuel and flue gases and the determinations of the proximate constitu- 
ents and heating values of peat, fuel oils, and the common coals. tFour 
h(>urs a week. 

20. Descriptive Mineralogy. — An elementary course in which the 
minerals pre largely identified by their physical properties. Open to 
all students. Four hours a week. 

27. Lubrication. — A study of lubricants, bearings, and methods of 
lubrication. Two hours a week. First nine weeks. 

41. Analysis of Pharmaceutical Products. — The work includes 
the simpler methods of quantitative analysis,, especially those methods 
01 interest to students in pharmacy. '\'TJ(/ht hours a week. 



182 



Chemistry 

44. Paper Mill Machinery. — The study of simple mechanism is fol- 
lowed by the study of machines common to the manufacture of paper 
of various kinds. Two hours a week. 



For graduates and undergraduates 

52. Organic Chemistry. — The work is principally with the com- 
pounds of the aliphatic series. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory 
work. Open to those who have taken Course 11. Three hours class 
room; \four hours laboratory work a week. 

53. Organic Chemistry. — A continuation of Course 52. The work 
is chiefly in the aromatic series. Three hours a week. 

54. Organic Analysis. — The methods for the quantitative deter- 
mination in organic substances of carbon hydrogen, nitrogen, sulphur, 
and the halogens. Open to those who have completed Courses 52 and 
53. tFour hours a week. 

55. Cellulose. — A laboratory course in which are studied the chem- 
ical reactions and characteristics of the commoner forms of cellulose. 
"\Four hours a week. 

57. Organic Preparations. — The work consists in the preparation 
and study of typical organic compounds. This course must be pre- 
ceded by Courses 52, 53. tSix hours a week. 

58. Dyeing. — The practical application of dyes to cotton, wool, and 
silk. ^Fifteen hours a week for two weeks. 

60. Elementary Quantitative Analysis. — An introductory course 
illustrating the fundamental principles of gravimetric and volumetric 
methods. Open to students who have had Course 11. \Ten hours a 
week. 

61, 62. Volumetric Analysis. — The student is made familiar with 
the common methods of volumetric analysis in addition to the simpler 
volumetric methods used in Course 60 which is a prerequisite. tFour 
hours a week, either semester. 

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College of Technology 

63. Quantitative Analysis. — Analysis of alloys, minerals, etc. Both 
gravimetric and volumetric methods are used. Open to students who 
have taken Course 60. ^Eight hours a week. 

64. Assaying. — The fire assay of typical ores for gold and silver. 
tFour hours a week. 

66. Water Analysis. — The analysis of water is studied both from 
the sanitary and from the industrial standpoint. Open to students who 
have taken Course 60. \Four hours a week. 

67. Electro Analysis. — The electrolytic methods of quantitative 
analysis for copper, nickel, lead, and similar determinations. Open to 
students who have taken Course 60. tFour hours a week. 

68. Chemical Calculations. The calculation of the results of 
chemical analyses by the use of graphic schemes, slide rules, factors 
and tables. Methods of changing routine analytic work so that the 
calculations may be simplified. The use of density tables as used com- 
mercially. Two hours a week. 

70. Fuel and Gas Calculations. The methods of calculating the 
heat value of a coal, the constant of a calorimeter, the heat losses of a 
furnace and similar problems. Two hours a week. Last nine weeks. 

71, 72. Physical Chemistry. — This course is devoted to the study 
of some of the more important principles and methods of physical 
chemistry in its several branches. Lectures and recitations. Open to 
students who have completed Chemistry 60, Mathematics 13, and Physics 
1, 2, 4. Three hours a week, fall semester; two hours a week, spring 
semester. 

74. Physical-Chemical Methods. — Determination of molecular 
weights ; the study of solutions through conductivity and other meth- 
ods ; rate of reaction and chemical equilibrium ; potential and electro- 
motive force; calorimetry; and the use of the more important instru- 
ments such as refractometer, polariscope, and spectrascope ^Six hours 
a week. 

75. Metallurgy of Iron and Steel. — The occurrence, methods of 
extraction, properties, and alloys of iron. Open to students who have 
completed Courses 1, 2, 5, 6 or 3, 4, 5, 6. Two hours a week. 

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Chemistry 

76. Metallurgy of the Metals other than Iron. — A course sim- 
ilar to Course 75. The metals other than iron and steel are studied. 
Open to students who have completed Course 11. Two hours a week. 

yy. Industrial Chemistry. — General processes of technical chemis- 
try, and selected topics, including the principal manufactured products 
of special interest. Lectures and recitations. As a part of this course 
an inspection trip is made to manufacturing plants of a chemical nature 
in New England. The expense of this trip the last few years has 
varied from $15 to $25 a year. Open to students who have completed 
Courses 11, 52, 53, 60. Three hours a week. 

81. Paper. — A lecture course on paper and the various processes of 
present day paper making. Open to those who have completed Courses 
11, 52. Two hours a week. 

82. Paper Manufacture. — A laboratory course in which paper 
machinery will be studied and paper of various kinds will be made. 
This course should be preceded by course 81. "\Four hours a week. 

83. The Making of Pulp. — A laboratory course in paper pulp mill 
chemistry. The work taken up is that ordinarily falling to the chemist 
of a pulp mill of either the soda, sulphate, or sulphite type. Open to 
students who have completed Course 60. tFour hours a week. 

84. Pulp. — A lecture course on the processes of manufacturing 
paper pulp. The uses of pulp other than in the manufacture of paper 
will also be discussed. Two hours a week. 

86. Bleaching of Pulp. — A laboratory course dealing with the 
methods of bleaching various kinds of pulp. Open to those who have 
taken Courses 82, 83. Wour hours a week. Last nine weeks. 

87. Paper Testing. The testing of paper for bursting strength, ten- 
sile strength, stretch, crumpling, etc. Also the methods for estimating 
the kinds and percentages of the various fibers present in a sample of 
paper. Wour hours a week. 

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College of Technology 

88. Paper Coloring. — A laboratory course on mordants, dye-stuffs, 
and their applications, testing, retention, matching of shades, etc. Open 
to those who have completed Course 55. Wour hours a week. 

89. Paper Problems. — A laboratory course for the study of selected 
processes of paper manufacture, as beating, sizing, loading, finishing, 
etc. Course 82 is a prerequisite. Wour hours a week. 

93, 94. Chemical Literature. — Reviews and discussions of leading 
articles appearing in current English, German, and French chemical 
literature. Open to juniors majoring in the department who have com- 
pleted the required work in modern languages. One hour a week, either 
semester. 

96. Mineralogy. — Open to those who have completed Course 60. 
\Four hours a week. 

98, 99. Thesis Work. — The thesis will embody the result of the study 
of a special problem in the laboratory. This problem will partake of 
the nature of original research and will ordinarily require not less than 
"\Ten hours a week. 



Primarily for graduates 

101. Advanced Organic Chemistry. — A series of lectures on special 
topics in organic chemistry. Open to students who have completed 
Courses 52, 53. Three hours a week. 

102, 103. Qualitative Analysis. — This course is similar to Course 11, 
but deals with organic compounds. It must be preceded by Courses 52, 
53. 'tFour hours a week, either semester. 

104. Technical Analysis. — An advanced course in the analysis of 
ores and industrial products. Open to students who have completed 
Courses 60, 63. f Eight hours a week. 

105. Electrochemistry. — A lecture course on the general principles 
of the subject and its applications in industrial work. Open to students 
who have completed Courses 71, 72. Two hours a week. 

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Chemistry 

Laboratory fees covering general chemicals, gas, etc., are as follows : 
Courses 5, 6, 11, 60, 98, 99, $5; Courses 16, 41, 52, 57, 63, 74, 104, $3; 
Courses 15, 17, 20, 54, 58, 61, 62, 64, 66, 67, 82, 83, 85, 87, 88, 89, 102, 103, $2. 

Broken apparatus and special chemicals are paid for at the chemical 
supply room by use of a "breakage card" obtained from the Treasurer's 
office. The portion of this card which has not been used will be re- 
deemed at the end of the semester. 

For courses in biological and agricultural chemistry, see the descrip- 
tion of courses given by the department of Biological and Agricultural 
Chemistry. 

Summer Term 

Professor McKee ; Associate Professor Easley ; Assistant Professor 

Burg hart 

3s General Chemistry. — A course of lectures and demonstrations on 
elementary chemistry. No previous knowledge of the subject is 
assumed. The course deals chiefly with the non-metals. 

4s. General Chemistry. — A continuation of Course 3s dealing chiefly 
with the metals. 

17s. Gas and Fuel Analysis. — This work consists in the analysis of 
fuel and flue gases and the determination of the proximate con- 
stituents and heating values of the more common fuels. Ten 
hours of laboratory work each week. 

51s. Organic Chemistry. — This is a general introductory course in the 
subject open to those who have had the freshman course in gen- 
eral chemistry or its equivalent. It is generally, though not 
necessarily, accompanied by laboratory work in the subject. 

55s. Cellulose and Its Use in Paper Making. — Open to students who 
have had an elementary course in organic chemistry. 

73s. Physical Chemistry. — Lectures on selected chapters of the sub- 
ject touching upon the following phases: molecular structure, 
the mass law, the theories of solution and their applications, 
especially along the line of electro-chemistry. 

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College of Technology 

91 s. Inorganic Preparations. — A laboratory course in the purification 
and preparation of typical inorganic compounds. Ten hours of 
laboratory work each week. 

92s. Methods of Laboratory Manipulation. — Glass bending, blowing, 
cutting, boring, and annealing; sealing of wires into glass and 
repair of glass apparatus ; soldering of the more common metals ; 
methods of labeling; stains, varnishes, and lacquers for wood 
and metal apparatus; setting up of apparatus. Six hours of 
laboratory work each week. 

Laboratory Work in general chemistry, qualitative analysis, quantita- 
tive analysis, physical chemistry and organic chemistry will be 
arranged according to the needs of those attending the Summer 
Term. 

Graduate Work. — Attention is called to the courses that may be taken 
for graduate credit by those who already have a bachelor's 
degree (Courses 51s, 73s, 91s, 92s, and several of the courses 
indicated under "Laboratory Work"). It is the custom of the 
department to vary from } r ear to year the courses offered in such 
a way that a student attending several successive summers will 
be able to complete the work necessary for a Master's degree. 
The fact that a considerable part of this work is of a laboratory 
character enables it to be varied in order and character to suit 
the needs of the individual student. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Professor Boardman ; Professor Brown ; Associate Professor Kaul- 

fuss; Acting Associate Professor Sprague; Assistant 

Professor Lyon ; Mr. Donegan ; Mr. Davis 

For undergraduates only 

1. Plane Surveying. — Recitations, lectures and field work. The 
lecitations and lectures cover the general theory of plane surveying; 
description of surveying equipment, and the adjustment of the instru- 
ments ; use of the chain, tape, compass, transit, and level, and other 
surveying operations. The field work consists of practice in the use of 

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Civil Engineering 

the chain, tape, compass, transit, level and other surveying equipment. 
Required of all students in the departments of Civil Engineering and 
Forestry. (Subdivision of field and recitation work determined by the 
instructor. The work shall be the equivalent of twenty-seven periods 
of recitations or lectures and fifty-four periods of field work.) 

2. Plotting. — This course consists chiefly of map drawing from field 
notes, by the different methods in common use. Course i is prerequisite. 
*Six hours a week. First twelve weeks. 

3. Plane Surveying. — A course similar to the recitations and lectures 
in Course 1, given to student? in the departments of Mechanical and 
Electrical Engineering. Two hours a week. 

4. Field Work in Surveying. — A continuation of the field work in 
Course 1. This course consists of original surveys, problem work, ad- 
justment of instruments, note keeping, etc. Course 1 is prerequisite. 
*Six hours a week. Last six weeks. 

5. Field Work in Surveying. — The use of the chain, compass, tran- 
sit, and level. Required of all students in the departments of Mechani- 
cal Engineering and Electrical Engineering. *Six hours a week. First 
six weeks. 

6. Railroad Curves. — A course of recitations and iectures investi- 
gating the geometry of railroad curves, switches and turnouts. Course 
1 or 3 is prerequisite. Three hours a week. First twelve weeks. 

8. Railroad Field Work. — This course consists of practice in running 
in railroad curves and turnouts. A general application of the theories 
of Course 6. Course 5 or Course 6 is prerequisite. tSix hours a week. 
Last six weeks. 

20. Masonry Construction. — A course including the discussion of 
building stone and brick; cement and their tests; mortar; plain and 
reinforced concrete; foundations; pneumatic caissons; culverts; bridge 
piers, and abutments. Two hours a week. 

21. Railroad Field Work. — The survey for a railroad about three 
miles in length. The preliminary and location surveys are made, includ- 

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mg running in the curves, obtaining the topography, establishing the 
grade, and setting the slope stakes. Courses 4, 6, 8, or Courses 4, 27 
are prerequisite. . *Six hours a week. First nine weeks. 

22. Advanced Surveying. — This course consists of lectures, readings 
and recitations on the theory of base line measurement, triangulation, 
precise leveling, topographical surveying, the use of the plane table, and 
the theory and application of least squares. It is a preparation for 
Course 24. Course 21 is prerequisite. Two hours a week. 

23. Railroad Office Work. — The office work of mapping the notes 
taken in Course 21, including the calculation of the earth work. Courses 
2, 21 are prerequisite. *Six hours a week. Last nine weeks. 

24. Summer Field Work. — This course consists of the practical ap- 
plication in the field and in the office of the principles given in Course 
22. The work is given during the two weeks following Commencement. 
Course 22 is prerequisite. 

25. Railroad Construction. — Recitations and lectures on the field 
and office practice of staking out and computing amount of excavation 
and fill ; borrow-pits ; haul ; methods and materials of railroad con- 
struction ; subgrade; roadbed; track and track work. Course 6 is pie 
requisite. Two hours a week. 

26. Hydraulics. — Fundamental data ; hydrostatics ; theoretical hy- 
draulics ; instruments and observations ; theoretical and actual flow 
through orifices, weirs, tubes, pipes, and conduits; dynamic pressure of 
water. Three hours a week. 

27. Simple Curves and Earthwork. — A lecture course on the theory 
and practice of simple railroad curves, and on the field and office prac- 
tice of staking out and computing earthwork. Given to students outside 
of the department of Civil Engineering who desire to take Courses 21 
and 23. Courses I, 4 or Courses 3, 5 are prerequisites. One hour a week. 

28. Structures. — The theory of the simple beam; loads and reac- 
tions; vertical shear; bending moment; influence lines. The object of 
this course is to give the student a drill in finding vertical shear and 



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Civil Engineering 

bending moment under different systems of loadings, and to familiarize, 
him with the use of steel hand books, various tables, and the slide rule. 
' Class room, Tzvo hours a week. Drawing room, f Two hours a week. 

2Q. Municipal Engineering. — The construction and improvement of 
city streets and pavements under different conditions of climate and 
traffic; general principles of sewer design; a study of city sanitation, 
water supply, and sewage disposal. Course i or 3 is prerequisite. Two 
hours a week. 

31. Roads and Trails. — This course consists of lectures on the prac- 
tice of building and maintaining trails and ordinary types of roads, and 
includes the design of simple beams and girders. 

33. Foundations. — Building stones; manufacture of cement; tests of 
cement; mortar; concrete, both plain and reinforced; foundations. This 
h a course of lectures given to students in the departments of Mechani- 
cal and Electrical Engineering. One hour a week. 

35. Hydraulics. — A short course which includes the main principles 
given in Course 26. Given to students in the departments of Mechani- 
cal and Electrical Engineering. Two hours a week. 

Thesis Work. — The study of and report upon some original investi- 
gation, or design. Time to be arranged. See regulations regarding de- 
grees. 



For graduates and undergraduates 

51. Hydraulic Field Work. — The measurement of the flow of rivers 
Is illustrated by the use of the current meter. The data thus obtained 
is used, to plot the rating curves, etc. The measurements taken are 
reported to the U. S. G. Survey. The expenses of this course are paid 
by the students. Required of students taking Option 1. Course 26 is 
prerequisite. tFour hours a week. 

52. Hydraulic Engineering. — A continuation of Course 55. Course 
51 is prerequisite. Three hours a week. 



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College of Technology 

53. Hydraulic Field Work. — A short course similar to Course 51. 
Required of students taking Options 2 and 3. Course 26 is prerequisite. 
fTwo hours a week. 

55. Hydraulic Engineering. — Rainfall, evaporation, and stream 
h'ow ; the development and utilization of water power ; the develop- 
ment of the modern turbine. Lectures and recitations. Required of 
students electing Option 1. Course 26 is prerequisite. Two hours a 
week. 

57. Structures. — A continuation of Course 28. The theory of 
stresses in framed structures, including the plate girder, bridge trusses, 
end roof trusses; reinforced concrete; the principles of designing. The 
object of this course is to train the student in the application of the 
principles of mechanics to the design of structures. Three hours a week. 

58. Structures. — A continuation of Course 57. This course includes 
a study of the higher types of structures. Three hours a week. 

59. Designing. — This course takes up the design for some of the 
common types of steel structures, and the preparation of the shop 
drawings. Course 28 is prerequisite. "\Nine hours a week. 

60. Graphic Statics. — Class and drawing room work in the graphical 
determination of shear and bending moment, and the analysis of bridge 
and roof trusses by graphical methods. Course 57 is prerequisite. Two 
hours a week. 

62. Designing. — A continuation of Course 59. Course 57 is pre- 
requisite. ^Six hours a week. 

63. Railroad Engineering. — A course discussing the economics of 
railroad location and operation. The railroad corporation, its rights 
and limitations; traffic; operating expenses; the locomotive and its 
work; distance; curves; grades. Required of students electing Option 
2. Course 25 is prerequisite. Three hours a week. 

64. Railroad Engineering.— A course in railroad design. A map 
reconnaissance for a railroad about twelve to fifteen miles in length is 



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Civil Engineering 

made, applying the theories of Course 63. The final line is located, 
profile made, grades established, and drainage areas and culverts cal- 
culated. The rails, switch points, frogs, and ties for a turnout ait 
designed. A railroad yard layout is computed and plotted. Required of 
students electing Option 2. Courses 23, 63 are prerequisites. "tSix hours 
a week. 

66. Railroad Engineering. — A course of lectures and recitations 
studying various railroad problems ; structures ; trestles ; culverts ; grade 
crossings and elimination ; yards and terminals ; signals and interlocking ; 
maintenance and betterment work. Required of students electing Option 
2 Course 63 is prerequisite. Two hours a week. 

67. Cement Laboratory. — This course consists of making the regu- 
lation commercial tests upon different samples of cement. A laboratory 
fee sufficient to cover the cost of materials used is charged. Required 
of students in Mechanical Engineering and in Civil Engineering. Course 
20 is prerequisite for students in Civil Engineering. The time varies. 

69. Highway Engineering. — The location, drainage, construction, 
and maintenance of country roads under various conditions of soil, 
climate, traffic, etc. ; highway economics, legislation and administration. 
Required of students electing Option 3. Course 29 is prerequisite. 
Three hours a week. 

70. Road Materials Laboratory. — Physical and chemical tests of 
sand, gravel, stone, brick, wood block, bituminous compounds, and 
other road materials. Course 29 and Chemistry 1 or 3, 2 or 4, 5, 6 are 
prerequisites. *Three hours per week. 

J2. Highway Design. — Drawing room study of highway location 
and relocation including plans of proposed improvement and construction 
of 5 miles of highway. Details estimates and specifications for same. 
Required of students electing Option 3. Course 69 is prerequisite. tSix 
hours a week. 

74. Highway Engineering. — An advanced course of lectures and 
recitations in highway economics, administration and legislation; general 
highway engineering problems. Required of students electing Option 3. 
Course 69 is prerequisite. Two hours a week. 

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College of Technology 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Professor Barrows; Associate Professor Childs; Mr. Cheswell; 

Mr. James 

For undergraduates only 

I, 2. Elementary Electricity. — Fundamental laws and principles of 
electricity, series and parallel circuits, electrical instruments, electrical 
measurements. Recitations and problems. Two hours a week. 

5. Elements of Electrical Engineering. — Application of laws 
studied in Course 1 and 2, the magnetic circuit, the fundamental study 
of electrical apparatus. Recitations and problems. Three hours a week. 

8. Laboratory Work. — Electrical measurements, operation and testing 
of direct current generators and motors. Application of the work of 
courses 1, 2, 5, 50. Laboratory fee $3.00. Four hours a week. 

30. Direct Current Machinery. — Electrical principles and applica- 
tions ; the production, distribution, and utilization of power from the 
standpoint of the mechanical and chemical engineer. Recitations and 
problems. Two hours a week. 

31. Alternating Currents. — Alternating current measurements and 
calculations ; operation of generators and motors. Lectures, recitations, 
and problems. Two hours a week. 

32. Electrical Applications. — Application of electrical machinery to 
the problems of the mechanical engineer; machine drive, industrial appli- 
cation. Lectures, recitations, and problems. Two hours a week. 

33. 34. Electrical Laboratory. — These courses are based on Courses 
30 and 31. Operation of direct current and alternating current gener- 
ators and motors ; electrical power measurements. Laboratory fee $3.00. 
IfFour hours a week. 

35. Alternating Current Apparatus. — Alternating current measure- 
ments and the operation of alternating current machinery. Lectures, 
recitations, and problems. Two hours a week. 



Electrical Engineering 

42. Electrical Power. — Electrical measurements ; the generation, 
transmission, and utilization of electrical power. Lectures, recitations, 
and problems. Tzvo hours a week. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

50. Elements of Electrical Engineering. — A continuation of Course 
5 ; principles of construction, operation, and testing of direct current 
generators and motors ; general engineering problems. Lectures, recita- 
tions, and problems. Three hours a week. 

51. Alternating Currents. — Effect of alternating currents upon 
various electric circuits ; voltage ; current and voltage relations in induc- 
tive and capacity circuits ; the theory, construction, and operation ot 
apparatus and machinery. Lectures, recitations, and problems. Three 
hours a week. 

52. Advanced Alternating Currents. — A continuation of Course 51 , 
polyphase apparatus ; generation, transmission, distribution and utiliza- 
tion of polyphase power; problems involving previous courses. Lectures, 
recitations, and problems. Two hours a week. 

53. 55. Electrical Design. — The design and construction of direct 
and alternating current machinery; relation of design to operating char- 
acteristic. Lectures and recitations, two hours a week. Calculations and 
design, four hours a week. 

54. Technical Reviews. — A study of some special phase of electrical 
engineering and the presentation of it to the class. One hour a week. 

56. Electrical Power Plants. — Electrical equipment of power plants ; 
methods of control, switching, protection, lightning arresters; arrange- 
ment of station and substation machinery, apparatus, and switchboards. 
Lectures and recitations. Two hours a week. 

58. Electrical Transmission. — High voltage long distance transmis- 
sion ; transmission line phenomena ; methods and practice of securing 
most reliable service. Lectures, recitations, and problems. Two hours 
a week. 



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College of Technology 

60. Wireless Telegraphy. — Fundamentals of wireless telegraphy and 
telephony. Detectors ; sending ; receiving ; tuning. Two hours a week. 
Given in 1915-1916 and alternate years. 

61. Illuminating Engineering. — Different types of lamps; light, 
photometry, illumination calculations, and problems of interior and ex- 
terior illumination. Lectures, recitations, and problems. Two hours a 
week. Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 

63. Telephone Engineering. — Principles of telephone apparatus and 
circuits ; telephone systems ; party lines, trunk lines ; central stations. 
Lectures and recitations. Two hours a week. Given in 1915-16 and 
alternate years. 

64. Electric Railway Engineering. — Preliminary considerations in 
electric railway engineering; selection of proper equpiment; car, bond, 
and transmission testing. Lectures, recitations, and problems. Two 
hours a week. 

75, 76. Laboratory Work. — Alternating current measurements ; operat- 
ing, testing, and experimental work on power and lighting apparatus; 
alternating current instruments ; generators, motors, transformers, syn- 
chronous converters, polyphase power measurements. Laboratory fee 
$3.00. Four hours a week. 

80. Thesis Work. — The study of and report upon some original re- 
port or design. Time to be arranged. See regulations regarding degrees 

MATHEMATICS 

The courses in this department are described under the College of 
Arts and Sciences 



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Mechanical Engineering 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Professor Sweetser; Associate Professor Lekberg; Mr. Davee; 
Mr. Carter ; Mr. Jennison ; Mr. Partridge 

For undergraduates only 

i. Woodworking. — Graded exercises in woodworking designed to 
make the student familiar with tools used in modern woodworking 
practice, and to give him experience in working from dimensioned draw- 
ings. Pattern work, consisting of the making of complete patterns and 
core boxes from drawings. Charge for materials $4.00. *Six hours a 
week. 

3. Woodworking. — A shorter course than Course 1, arranged for 
students in Agricluture and Chemical Engineering. Charge for male- 
rials $4.00. *Four hours a week. 

6. Forge Work. — Forging; welding; tool dressing. A set of laths 
tools and cold chisels for use in machine shop is made by each studenr. 
Charge for material $5.00. *Four hours a week. 

7, 8. Machine Work. — Exercises in chipping and filing; lathe work; 
exercises on planer, shaper, and milling machines ; making cut gears, 
machinists' taps, etc. Course 6 is a prerequisite. Charge for materials 
$5.00. *Six hours a week for mechanical engineers ; *four hours a week 
for electrical engineers. 

11, 12. Foundry Work. — Foundry instruction is given in molding, 
mixing of materials, operation of cupolas, etc. The work is assigned 
'in connection with Course 8, ten per cent of hours registered for under 
Course 8 being applied to foundry work. 

14. Power Generation and Application. — A course arranged for 
students in Forestry and Chemical Engineering. Fuels ; steam boilers ; 
steam and gas engines ; locomotives ; log haulers, etc. Two hours per 
week. 

15. Heating and Ventilation. — A course arranged for students in 
Home Economics. Two hours a week, first nine weeks. 



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College of Technology 

59. Kinematical Drawing. — Supplementary to Course 56 which is a 
prerequisite. The drawings are of cams, gear teeth, and graphical studies 
of kinematic a) problems. *Four hours a week. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

56. Kinematics. — A study of motion in machine design ; linkages, 
gears, cams, etc. Three hours a week. 

57. Mechanism of Machines. — Lectures supplementing Course 56. 
Course 56 is a prerequisite. Three hours a week, for six weeks. 

61. Materials of Engineering. — Properties of the metals; timber, 
rope ; protective coatings and preservatives. Three hours a week. First 
twelve weeks. 

64a. Graphics. — A course given in connection with Course 64b. 
Classroom work. Tzvo hours a week. First nine weeks. 

64b. Graphics. — A drawing room course supplementing Course 64a. 
The problems assigned include graphical determination of center of 
gravity, bending moments of beams; shear diagrams; stresses in bridge 
members and roof trusses. *Three hours a week. 

66. Machine Design. — A study of the designing of machines ; pro- 
portioning of parts for strength, rigidity, etc. Mechanics 5, 6 are pre- 
requisites. Three hours a week. 

67. Machine Design. — A continuation of Course 66, including the 
execution of the design of some typical machines. Course 66 is a pre- 
requisite. *Six hours a week. 

68. Valve Gears. — A study of the principal steam engine valve mo- 
tions; construction and use of valve diagrams; solution of practical 
problems in the drawing room. One and one half hours a week. 

70. Mechanical Laboratory. — Elementary experimental work such as 
calibration of instruments, simple tests, etc. Laboratory charge $2.00. 
hours a week. 

I98 



Mechanical Engineering 

71. Mechanical Laboratory. — Tests of materials, hydraulic testing, 
injectors, use of steam calorimeter, valve settings, etc. Laboratory 
charge $3.00. \Four hours a week. 

72. Mechanical Laboratory. — Tests of steam engines, boilers, and 
gasoline engines. Laboratory charge $3.00. J (Four hours a week. 

74. Mechanical Laboratory. — A course arranged for students in 
Civil Engineering. Testing of strength of materials ; measurement of 
flow of water over weirs; calibration of water meters. Laboratory 
charge $2,00. tTwo hours a week. 

75. Mechanical Laboratory. — A course arranged for students in 
Chemical Engineering. Calibration of instruments; tests of engines; 
measurement of flow of water; tests of lubricants. Laboratory 
charge $2.00. 'tTwo hours a week. 

77. Mechanical Laboratory. — A course arranged for students in 
Electrical Engineering. Calibration of instruments ; testing of strength 
of materials; testing of steam engines, pumps, and fans. Laboratory 
charge, $2.00. t Three hours a week. 

80. Heat Engineering. — Fundamental theories of gas and steam, 
with illustrative problems of practical form. Laws of thermodynamics; 
laws of gases; characteristic equations for gases; kinds of expansion 
and compression ; Carnot's cycle ; heat quantities in steam ; use of 
steam tables; steam equations; quality of steam; calorimeter; entropy; 
Mathematics 8 and Physics 1 and 2 are prerequisites. Three hours a 
week. 

83. Heat Engineering. — Types and details of steam boilers, engines. 
?nd auxiliary machinery. Fuels; combustion; efficiency factors of the 
steam boiler plant ; heat losses in the steam engine ; compound steam 
engines ; refrigeration ; gas engine cycles and gas producer principles. 
For students in Electrical Engineering a study of steam turbines is 
included. Course 80 is a prerequisite. Three hours a w^ek. 

84. Heat Engineering. — A continuation of courses 80 and 83 dealing 
with steam engines; steam turbines; air compressors; refrigerating ma- 

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College of Technology 

chinery, and gas engines ; considerations affecting the design and effi- 
ciency of operation of heat motors; the layout of power plants; power 
plant economics. Two hours a week. 

88. Engine Design. — A study of problems affecting the design of a 
steam or gas engine with regard to their bearing on general machine 
design. An engine is partially designed in the drawing room. Courses 
67 and 83 are prerequisite. *Six hours a week. 

89. Steam Boiler Design. — A study of the important points affecting 
the design of fire-tube and water-tube boilers, including the complete 
design of a boiler in the drawing room ; preparation of the specifica- 
tions for the boiler and design of a chimney. Course 66 is a prerequisite. 
*Three hours a week. 

91. Heating and Ventilation. — Course 80 is a prerequisite. Three 
hours a week. First six weeks. 

94. Hydraulic MACHiNERY.-^-Hydraulic turbine; water wheels; vari- 
ous features of hydraulic power plant development. Three hours a 
week. First nine weeks. 

96. Seminary. — Preparation, presentation, and discussion of papers 
on leading engineering topics. One hour a week. 

99. Factory Organization and Management. — Lectures and as- 
signed reading bearing upon various types of organization for industrial 
enterprises ; planning and equipping of factory plants ; systems of man- 
agement; factory design and construction. Two hours a week. 

Thesis. — The results of some original investigation or design pre- 
sented in proper form. The subject should be selected early in the fall 
semester of the senior year. See regulations regarding degrees. 



200 



Mechanics and Drawing 

MECHANICS AND DRAWING 

Professor Weston: Associate Professor Grover; Mr. Farnham ; 

Mr. Leighton 

For undergraduates only 

1. Drawing. — Instruction and practice in technical freehand drawing 
and lettering, in the care of drawing instruments, and their use in 
elementary problems involving right lines, circles, conic sections, and 
orthographic projections. *Six hoars a week. 

2. Drawing. — A continued study of the methods of orthographic 
protection, isometric projection, and oblique projection, accompanied 
by instruction and practice in the making of working drawings and 
tracings. *Six hours a week. 

3. Drawing. — The elementary principles and problems of descriptive 
geometry, including intersections and developments. *Six hours a 
week. 

4. Drawing. — A continued study of the making of working draw- 
ings of simple machines, together with instruction and practice in 
making titles for the same. *Six hours a week. 

9, 10. Drawing. — A course designed especially for students in agri- 
culture and for non-engineers. It combines the fundamental principles 
of Course 1 and Course 2. *Three hours a week. 

II. Mechanics. — An elementary course in the fundamental prin- 
ciples of statics, kinematics and kinetics, with applications to practical 
problems, as friction, transmitting power of belts, stresses and strains 
of bodies subject to tension, compression and shearing, as beams and 
columns. For students in Chemical Engineering. Three hours a week. 



For graduates and undergraduate? 

51, 52. Mechanics. — The fundamental principles of statics, kine- 
matics, and kinetics, with applications to practical problems ; exercises 
in finding centre of gravity and moment of inertia; the study of 

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College of Technology 

stresses and strains in bodies subject to tension, compression, and 
shearing; the common theory of beams, including shearing force, 
bending moment and elastic curves ; torsional stresses and theories of 
stress in long columns. Five hour a week. 

Primarily for graduates 

101. Advanced Mechanics. — General principles of kinematics, 
statics, and kinetics; the mathematical theory of elasticity; the theory 
of the potential function with applications to problems in gravitation, 
hydro-mechanics, etc. Two hours a week. 

102. Advanced Mechanics. — A continuation of Course 101. Three 
hours a week. 

MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

The courses in this department are described on page 205. 

PHARMACY 

Associate Professor Jarrett ; Doctor Connors 

2. Organic Pharmacognosy. — Macroscopic and microscopic study 
of organic drugs, identification, collection, and selection ; active prin- 
ciples. Four hours a week. 

3. Materia Medica. — The physical, chemical, physiological, and 
therapeutical properties of medicine; their doses; poisons and anti- 
dotes. Three hours a week. 

4. Inorganic Pharmacognosy. — Macroscopic study of inorganic 
drugs, tests, etc. Two hours a week. 

7. Pharmaceutical Chemistry. — Chemical formulae; principles; 
chemical reactions ; equations, with special reference to pharmaceutical 
processes. Three hours a week. 

(j. Pharmaceutical- Arithmetic. — The arithmetic pertaining to the 
science and art of pharmacy; special emphasis placed on the metric 
system in all of its practical details; the accurate use of the various 
current weights and measures. Three hours a week. 

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Pharmacy 

ii. Pharmaceutical Latin. — The Latin pertaining to pharmacy; 
such essentials of inflection and syntax are taught as will serve the 
practical purpose of enabling the student to read prescriptions with 
ease and intelligence. Tzvo hours a week. 

13. Theoretical Pharmacy. — The exposition of the principles upon 
which pharmaceutical operations are based. This includes the study 
of pharmacopoeias, dispensatories, etc. ; weights and measures ; specific 
gravity ; pharmaceutical uses of heat ; extemporaneous pharmacy ; the 
principles of dispensing, etc. Three hours a week. 

14. Pharmacopoeia. — A complete review of the pharmacopoeia with 
special reference to the chemical and pharmaceutical principles in- 
volved in the tests and preparations. Five hours a week. 

16, 17. Laboratory Pharmacy (Manufacturing). — The preparation 
of the most important U. S. P. galenicals and such additional U. S. P. 
and N. F. preparations as the time will permit, selecting the latter from 
those which require skill and careful manipulation, t Eight hours a 
week. 

18. Laboratory Pharmacy (Dispensing). — This course teaches the 
compounding of medicine. The time is so arranged as to give a liberal 
number of hours for the actual work in the compounding of prescrip- 
tions. Incompatibilities, how to overcome them, etc. The work includes 
the preparation of solutions, mixtures, emulsions, pills, capsules, pow- 
ders, cachets, tablets, tablet triturates, troches, ointments, plasters, sup- 
positories, etc. ^Twelve hours a week. 

20. Prescriptions. — This course includes the abbreviations and 
symbols used ; reading, labeling, checking, and filing. Critical exami- 
nation of prescriptions from actual files, with reference to principles, 
and to physiological, pharmaceutical, and chemical incompatibilities ; 
doses ; methods and order of compounding, etc. Three hours a week. 

22. Advanced Laboratory (Manufacturing). — Manufacture of toilet 
preparations, etc. Wour hours a week. 

51. Urinalysis and Toxicology. — The analysis of urine and the 
detection of the most common poisons. Two hours a week. 

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College of Technology 

54. Pharmacy Readings. — Current pharmacy literature: research 
and reference readings ; abstracting ; reports and theme writing on 
various subjects pertaining to pharmacy. One hour a week. 

58. Commercial Pharmacy. — Trade or commerce in pharmaceutical 
products. It includes bookkeeping, business correspondence, commer- 
cial and business law, and business practice. Two hours a week. 



204 



Required Courses 



REQUIRED COURSES 



MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

Professor Clark 

Of the following scheduled courses i to 4 inclusive are required of 
all freshmen and sophomores with the exceptions noted elsewhere; 
5 to 8 inclusive are elective for juniors; and 9 and 12 are elective for 
seniors. 

The required courses cover two years' instruction as laid down in 
War Department orders. For convenience in arranging- the schedule, 
freshmen and sophomores are united in this instruction. Only Courses 
1, 2 or 3, 4 will be given in the same year, Course 1 alternating with 
Course 2, and Course 2 with Course 4. It is necessary for each student 
to complete all four of these courses. 

The elective courses are so scheduled that juniors and seniors may 
have the privilege of advanced theoretical military instruction in addi- 
tion to the courses required for cadet officers. By action of the 
faculty, it is provided that for any junior or senior satisfactorily com- 
pleting either Courses 5, 6, 9, or 10, as a cadet captain commanding a 
company, academic credit of three hours a week may be granted. 

1. Military Science and Tactics — 

Three hours a week (counting one-fifth unit) 

(a) Practical 

U. S. infantry drill regulations, to include the schools 
of the soldier, squad, and company, in close order 
and extended order; indoor rifle practice. 

(b) Theoretical 

Lectures on military organization, methods, history, and 
policy; map reading; the service of information. 

205 



Required Courses 

2. Military Science and Tactics — 

Three hours a week (counting one-fifth unit) 

(a) Practical 

U. S. Infantry drill regulations, to include the school of 
the battalion in close and extended order, and cere- 
monies ; indoor rifle practice. 

(b) Theoretical 

The service of security; combat; supply in the field. 

3. Military Science and Tactics — 

Three hours a week (counting one-fifth unit) 

(a) Practical 

The same as Course 1 (a). 

(b) Theoretical 

U. S. infantry drill regulations, to include the school of 
the company; small arms firing regulations ; lectures. 

4. Military Science and Tactics — 

Three hours a week (counting one-fifth unit) 

(a) Practical 

The same as course 2 (a). 

(b) Theoretical 

U. S. infantry drill regulations, to include the school of 
the battalion, and ceremonies ; military hygiene and 
first aid. 

5. Military Science and Tactics — 

Four hours a week (counting two-fifths unit) 

(a) Practical 

Duties consistent with rank as cadet officers in connec- 
tion with Courses 1 (a) or 3 (a). 

(b) Theoretical. Course 7. 

6. Military Science and Tactics— 

Four hours a week (counting two-fifths unit) 
Practical 

Duties consistent with rank as cadet officers in connec- 
tion with Course 2 (a) or 4 (a). 
Theoretical. Course 8. 

206 



Required Courses 

7. Military Science and Tactics — 

Minor tactics, field orders ; administration, preparation of 
papers. One hour a week (counting one-fifth unit) 

8. Military Science and Tactics — 

Minor tactics, continued ; property accountability, requi- 
sitions and returns ; manual of interior guard duty. 
One hour a week (counting one-fifth unit) 

9. Military Science and Tactics — 

Four hours a zveek (counting two-fifths unit) 

(a) Practical 

Duties consistent with rank as cadet officers in connec- 
tion with Courses 1 (a) or 3 (a). 

(b) Theoretical. Course 11. 

10. Military Science and Tactics — 

Four hours a week (counting two-fifths unit) 

(a) Practical 

Duties consistent with rank as cadet officers in connec- 
tion with Courses 2 (a) or 4 (a). 

(b) Theoretical. Course 12. 

11. Military Science and Tactics — 

Tactical problems ; the arms combined ; map maneuvers ; 
court-martial procedure. One hour a zveek (count- 
ing one-fifth unit) 

12. Military Science and Tactics — 

Problems in mobilization and supply ; American cam- 
paigns ; the military law of Maine. One hour a week 
(counting one-fifth unit) 



PHYSICAL CULTURE AND ATHLETICS 

Professor Wingard; Miss Vaughan ; Mr. Smith 

1. Physical Training. — Class formation and figure marching; set- 
ting-up drills ; free-arm and calisthenics movement : elementary dumb- 
bell, wand, and apparatus exercises. One hour lecture and *two hours 
practice a week. 

207 



Required Courses 

2. Physical Training. — Intermediate and advanced class exercises 
and combination apparatus work. One hour lecture and *two hours 
practice a week. 

3. Physical Training. — An elective advanced course. *Two hours 
gymnasium and two hours lecture. 

4. Physical Training. — A continuation of Course 3. *Two hours 
gymnasium and two hours lecture. 

5. Practical Hygiene. — Two hours a week. 

6. Practical Hygiene. — A continuation of Course 5. Two hours a 
week. 

7. 8. Physical Training. — A course for all women students of the 
first year and for students of second year Household Economics. Class 
formation ; free exercises ; elementary dumb-bell, Indian club, wand 
drills ; folk-dancing and games. Attention is given to first principles of 
deportment. Three hours a week. 



208 



Experiment Station 



MAINE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT 
STATION 



STATION STAFF 



CHARLES DAYTON WOODS, Sc. D. 
JAMES MONROE BARTLETT, M. S. 
WARNER JACKSON MORSE, Ph. D. 
RAYMOND PEARL, Ph. D. 
FRANK MACY SURFACE, Ph. D. 
EDITFI MARION PATCH, Ph. D. 
HERMAN HERBERT HANSON, M. S. 
MAYNIE ROSE CURTIS, Ph. D. 
ROYDEN LINDSAY HAMMOND Seed 
EDWARD EUGENE SAWYER, B. S. 
ELMER ROBERT TOBIE, B. S. 
MICHAEL SHAPOVALOV, M. S. 
JOHN RICE MINER, B. A. 
JACOB ZINN, Agr. D. 
WALTER HENRY ROGERS, B. S. 
CHARLES HARRY WHITE 
WALTER EDSON CURTIS 



Director 

Chemist 

Plant Pathologist 

Biologist 

Biologist 

Entomologist 

Associate Chemist 

Assistant Biologist 

Analysist and Photographer 

Assistant Chemist 

Assistant Chemist 

Assistant Pathologist 

Computer 

Assistant Biologist 

Assistant Chemist 

Scientific Aid 

Scientific Aid 



GOVERNMENT OF THE STATION 

By authority of the Trustees the affairs of the Station are considered 
by the Station Council, (see page 6), composed of the President of the 
University, three members of the Board of Trustees, the Director of 
the Station, the heads of the various departments of the Station, the 
Dean of the College of Agriculture, the Commissioner of Agriculture, 
and one member each from the State Pomological Society, the State 
Grange, the State Dairymen's Association, the Maine Live Stock Breed- 



209 



14 



Experiment Station 

ers' Association, and the Maine Seed Improvement Association. The rec- 
ommendations of the Council are referred to the Trustees for final ac- 
tion. The Director is the executive officer of the Station and the other 
members of the staff carry out the lines of research that naturally come 
under their departments. 

INCOME 

The income of the Station for the year 1915-16 will probably be about 
$60,000 from the following sources: Federal government, Hatch and 
Adams funds, $30,000; State appropriations for animal husbandry in- 
vestigations and investigations upon Aroostook Farm, $5,000 each ; 
sale of produce about $8,000; analyses for the Commissioner of Agri- 
culture about $12,000. Thru appropriations to the university the State 
provides for the cost of printing Station publications. This aggregates 
about $4,000 annually. 

OBJECT 

The purpose of the agricultural experiment stations is defined in the 
Act of Congress establishing them as follows : 

"It shall be the object and duty of said experiment stations to con- 
duct original researches or verify experiments on the physiology of 
plants and animals; the diseases to which they are severally subject, 
with the remedies for the same; the chemical composition of useful 
plants at their different stages of growth ; the comparative advantages 
of rotative cropping as pursued under a varying series of crops ; the 
capacity of new plants or trees for acclimation; the analysis of soils 
and water; the chemical composition of manures, natural and artificial, 
with experiments designed to test their comparative effects on crops of 
different kinds ; the adaptation and value of grasses and forage plants ; 
the composition and digestibility of the different kinds of food for 
domestic animals ; the scientific and economic questions involved in the 
production of butter and cheese ; and such other researches or experi- 
ments bearing directly on the agricultural industry of the United States 
as may in each case be deemed advisable, having due regard to the 
varying conditions and needs of the respective states or territories." 

The work that the Station can undertake from the Adams Act fund 
is more restricted, as the fund can "be applied only to paying the neces- 
sary expenses of conducting original researches or experiments bearing 
directly on the agricultural industry of the United States, having due 
regard to the varying conditions and needs of the respective states and 
territories." 

210 



Experiment Station 

EQUIPMENT 

Most of the Station offices and laboratories are in Holmes Hall, de- 
scribed on page 25. The Station is well equipped in laboratories and 
apparatus, particularly in the lines of biological, chemical, entomological, 
horticultural, pomological, plant pathological, and poultry investigations. 
It has extensive collections illustrating the botany and entomology of the 
State. It has a library of over 4,200 volumes, comprising agricultural and 
biological journals and publications of the various experiment stations. 



HIGHMOOR FARM 

The State Legislature of 1909 purchased a farm upon which the Maine 
Agricultural Experiment Station "shall conduct scientific investigations 
in orcharding, corn, and other farm crops." The farm is situated in the 
counties of Kennebec and Androscoggin, largely in the town of Mon- 
mouth. It is on the Farmington branch of the Maine Central Railroad, 
two miles from Leeds Junction. A flag station, "Highmoor," is on the 
farm. 

The farm contains 225 acres, about 200 of which are in orchards, fields, 
and pastures. There are in the neighborhood of 3,000 apple trees upon 
the place which have been set from 20 to 30 years. Fields that are not 
in orchards are well adapted to experiments with corn, potatoes, and 
similar general farm crops. The house has two stories with a large 
wing, and contains about 15 rooms. It is well arranged for the Station 
offices and for the home of the farm superintendent. The barns are 
large, affording storage for hay and grain. The basement affords limited 
storage for apples, potatoes, and roots. 

AROOSTOOK FARM 

By action of the Legislatures of 1913 and 191 5 a farm was purchased 
in Aroostook County for scientific investigations in agriculture to be 
under "the general supervision, management, and control" of the Maine 
Agricultural Experiment Station. The farm is in the town of Presque 
Isle, about two miles south of the village, on the main road to Houlton. 
The Bangor and Aroostook railroad crosses the farm. A flag station, 
"Aroostook Farm," makes it easily accessible by rail. 

The farm contains about 275 acres, about half of which is cleared. 
The eight room house provides an office, and home for the farm super- 

211 



Experiment Station 

xiitendent. The large barn affords storage for hay and gram and has a 
large potato storage house in the basement. 

INVESTIGATIONS 

The Station continues to restrict its work to a few important lines, 
believing that it is better for the agriculture of the State to study 
thoroly a few problems than to spread over the whole field of agricul- 
tural science. It has continued to improve its facilities and segregate ils 
work in such a way as to make it an effective agency for research in 
agriculture. Prominent among the lines of investigation are studies 
upon the food of man and animals, the diseases of plants and animals, 
breeding of plants and animals, investigations in animal husbandry, 
orchard and field experiments, poultry investigations, and entomo- 
logical research. 

INSPECTIONS 

The Commissioner of Agriculture is the executive of the laws regu- 
lating the sale of agricultural seeds, commercial feeding stuffs, com- 
mercial fertilizers, dairy products, drugs, foods, fungicides and insecti- 
cides. The law requires the Commissioner to collect samples and have 
them analyzed at the Station. The law also requires the Director of the 
Station to make the analyses and publish the results. 

PUBLICATIONS 

The Station issues three series of publications : Bulletins, Official 
Inspections, and Miscellaneous Publications. 

The results of the work of investigation are published in part in scien- 
tific journals at home and abroad, in U. S. Department of Agriculture 
publications, and in Bulletins of the Station. All of the more im- 
portant and immediately practical studies are published in the Station 
Bulletins. The Bulletins for a year form a volume of 300 to 400 pages 
and together make up the annual report. Bulletins are sent to the 
press of the State, to exchanges, libraries, and scientific workers. Bulle- 
tins which contain matter of immediate value to practical agriculture 
are sent free to residents of Maine whose names are on the permanent 
mailing list. 

212 



Experiment Station 

The results of the work of inspection are printed in pamphlet form 
and are termed Official Inspections. About twelve such pamphlets, ag- 
gregating 150 to 200 pages, are printed annually, and are bound as an 
appendix with the annual report. Official Inspections are sent to dealers 
within the State ; those that have to do with fertilizers, feeding stufTs, 
and seeds are sent to farmers, and those reporting food and drugs are 
sent to a list of several thousand women within the State. 

The Miscellaneous Publications consist of newspaper bulletins, circu- 
lars, and similar fleeting publications.. From twenty to thirty are pub- 
lished each year and are sent to different addresses according to the 
nature of the subject matter. 

On request, the name of any resident of Maine will be placed on the 
permanent maining list to receive either or both the Bulletins and Offi- 
cial Inspections as they are published. 



213 



Summer Term 



SUMMER TERM 



The Summer Term of the University of Maine is not a summer 
school, but so far as practicable the work is coordinate with that of the 
remainder of the year. The majority of the courses offered are of col- 
lege grade, and, when completed, entitle the student to full credit on 
the university books. There are no examinations for admission, and 
students are permitted to enter any class in which they can satisfactorily 
carry on the work. Before counting this work toward a collegiate 
degree, the entrance conditions must be met. 

Three classes of students may be benefited by the work of this term: 

1. Teachers in the high schools and grammar schools who desire to 
fit themselves for more advanced positions. A small expenditure of time 
and money in the summer vacation may be the means of securing a 
more desirable position. School superintendents are coming to dis- 
criminate in favor of those teachers who advance in their work. 

2. Students who desire to anticipate work in their curricula, or 
who may have work in arrears. A student should be able to make one 
unit, the equivalent of a five hours' subject for eighteen weeks. 

3. Courses in physics, chemistry, mathematics, Latin, and other sub- 
jects are offered covering the work of the high school. In this way a 
student who is slightly deficient at the end of the school year may pre- 
pare himself for college. These courses give no credit on the univer- 
sity books. 

Courses of Study 

During the summer of 1915 courses were offered in the following 

subjects: Chemistry, Education, English, French, German, History, 

Horticulture, Latin, Mathematics, Physics, Sociology, and Spanish. 

courses are described in connection with the courses offered at 

the university during the remainder of the year. 

214 



Summer Term 

DAILY ASSEMBLY 

Each morning except Saturdays and Sundays the faculty and students 
meet in the Chapel at 10.15 for a brief assembly. A short religious 
s< rvice is held, including a song service, and an address is given on 
some topic of current interest. 

LIBRARY 

Throughout the Summer Term, the university library of 56,000 vol- 
umes, and the reading rooms containing about 300 periodicals and the 
Maine daily papers, are open from 9 a. m. to 12 m. and from 2 p. m. 
to 5 p. m v daily, except Saturday afternoon and Sunday. The library 
pi ivileges ordinarily accorded university students, including the home 
use of books, are extended to students in the Summer Term. 

LABORATORIES AND OBSERVATORY 

The laboratories of the departments of Physics and Chemistry are 
available for use of the students. There is ample provision for carry- 
ing on the various courses from the preparatory work to that of the 
graduate student. All necessary apparatus is supplied to the student 
without charge; a small charge is made to cover the cost of the articles 
used. The departments are well equipped with modern apparatus. 

The Observatory contains an eight-inch telescope, vertical circle, and 
other instruments of precision. The work of the observatory will be 
explained by Professor Hart in an evening lecture. 

RECREATION 

The athletic field of the university is available for use. Certain 
afternoons from four to six are set aside each week for baseball games 
and other athletic events. A tennis tournament is organized for those 
interested. 

Under the management of a permanent committee appointed for that 
purpose, tramps, picnics, and longer trips to neighboring places of inter- 
est will be arranged, as well as more informal occasions on the campus; 
where the students have opportunity to meet each other and the members 
of the faculty. 

For the further entertainment of the Summer Term students and their 
friends, the gymnasium will be open one evening of each week, where 

215 



Summer Term 

music will be furnished and opportunity afforded for informal social 
intercourse. 

EXPENSES 

Tuition 

For residents of Maine, $12.00. 

For residents of other states, $18.00. 

An additional charge of $1 an hour is made for registration in excess 
of fifteen hours a week. 

Tuition covers all charges for instruction up to fifteen hours a week, 
use of library and laboratories, except a small additional fee covering 
cost of materials used in the laboratories. 

Rooms for Men 

There are two dormitories for men, Oak Hall and Hannibal Hamlin 
Hall, connected by a covered passage-way. Rooms may be obtained for 
$2.00 a week for one person or $2.50 with two in a room. In Hannibal 
Hamlin Hall there are a few higher priced rooms. 

Rooms for Women 

The dormitory used for women students in the Summer Term on the 
campus is the Mt. Vernon House. The rates are $2.00 a week, one 
person in a room, or $2.50 with two persons in a room. This house of 
old colonial style, with its wide hall, open fire-place, and its broad 
piazza, looking out upon a beautiful view of the campus, is a desirable 
place for summer residence. 

Meals 

In the dining room of Hannibal Hamlin Hall meals will be served 
for $3.00 a week. Meals will be served in the Mt. Vernon House at 
$5.00 a week. 

The University Inn, located in the village of Orono, is under univer- 
sity management and is open for summer students. Rooms in private 
families may be secured for those who prefer them. 

Men who wish to bring their families should write early. Special 
effort will be made to secure suitable accommodations. 



2l6 



Summer Term 

IN GENERAL 

Prospective students are invited to consult Dean J. S. Stevens, or any 
of the instructors, for further details regarding any of the courses, jr 
upon any subject relating to the work. It is the wish of the authorities 
to offer such courses as will best appeal to the teachers of Maine, and 
others who desire to avail themselves of these privileges.. 

If there should be a considerable demand for other studies than those 
n?med, arrangements will be made to provide for them as far as prac- 
ticable. In case the registration for any course offered falls below a 
certain minimum, it may be withdrawn. The list of instructors and the 
courses outlined in this catalogue were for the summer of 191 5. Unim- 
portant changes are likely to be made in 1916. 



217 



Alumni Associations 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS 



GENERAL ASSOCIATION 

President, Allen W. Stephens, 1899, I2 o West 57th St., New York, N. Y. 

Vice President, J. Harvey McGure, 1905, 49 Hammond St., Bangor 

Recording Secretary, Fremont L. Russell, 1885, Orono 

Alumni Secretary, Ralph K. Jones, 1886, Orono 

Treasurer, James A. Gannett, 1908, Orono 

Necrologist, James N. Hart, 1885, Orono 

ADVISORY COUNCIL 

At Large 

Term Expires. 

Charles S. Bickford, 1882, Belfast 1915 

Paul L. Bean, 1904, State House, Augusta 1915 

Edward H. Kelley, 1890, 2 Fairmount Park, East, Bangor 1916 

C. Parker Crowell, 1908, 44 Central St., Bangor 1916 

George H. Hamlin, 1873, Orono 1917 

Albert H. Brown, 1880, Old Town 1917 

Louis C. Southard, 1875, 601 Tremont Building, Boston, Mass. 1918 

Charles E. Oak, 1876, 39 Hammond St., Bangor 1918 

Perley B. Palmer, 1896, Orono 1919 

Allen W. Stephens, 1899, 120 West 57th St., New York, N. Y. 1919 

College of Agriculture 
Whitman H. Jordan, 1875, Geneva, N. Y 1915 

College of Law 

Charles P. Conners, 1906, 49 Hammond St., Bangor 1916 

DeForest H. Perkins, 1900, City Hall, Portland 1917 

2l8 



Alumni Associations 

College of Technology 
George F. Black, 1886, 238 St. John St., Portland 1918 

SPECIAL ASSOCIATIONS 
College of Law 

President, James M. Gillin, 12 Columbia Building, Bangor 
Vice President, Forrest B. Snow, 1909, Bluehill 
Secretary, Mark A. Barwise, 1913, 101 Third St., Bangor 
Treasurer, Charles H. Reid, Jr., 1903, 7 Hammond St., Bangor 

School and Teachers' Courses in Agriculture 

President, Walter S. Jones, 1912, State Hospital, Bangor 

Vice Presidents, George P. Fogg, 1908; Arthur W. Richardson, 1913 

Secretary-Treasurer, Perley F. Smith, 1912, R. F. D. 1, East Brownfield 

LOCAL ASSOCIATIONS 

Androscoggin Valley. — President, Walter L. Emerson, 1909; Secretary, 
Charles B. Hosmer, 191 1, 64 Lisbon St., Lewiston 

Boston. — President, Francis H. Bacon, 1876; Secretary, Elmer J. Wilson, 
1907, 15 Clough St., Lynn, Mass. 

Knox County. — President, A. P. Starrett, 1882; Secretary, R. S. Sher- 
man, 1906, Tillson Wharf, Rockland 

New York. — President, Philip Garland, 1912; Secretary, Ashton H. Hart, 
191 1, 161 Emerson PL, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Pacific. — President, George R. Sweetser, 1909; Secretary, Walter W. 
Black, 1907, 527 Taylor St., Portland, Ore. 

Penobscot Valley. — President, Harry M. Smith, 1893; Secretary, Wil- 
liam R. Ballou, 1912, 50 Blackstone St., Bangor 

Pittsburgh. — President, J. W r ilson Brown, 1899; Secretary, Carl D. 
Smith, U. S. Bureau of Mines, 40th and Butler Sts. 

Washington, D. C. — President, Lore A. Rogers, 1896; Secretary, Henry 
W. Bearce, 1906, Bureau of Standards 

Western. — President, Charles A. Morse, 1879; Secretary, Samuel B. 
Lincoln, ex-1915, 619 First National Bank Building, Chicago, 111. 

Western Maine. — President, Edwin J. Haskell, 1872; Secretary, Albert 
E. Anderson, 1909, Masonic Temple, Portland 

219 



Appointments 



APPOINTMENTS 



Speakers at the Junior Exhibition 

Marie Frederica Foster, Sorrento; Earl Stephen Merrill, Orono; 
Ansel Alva Packard, Belfast; Samuel Rudman, Bangor; Dorothy 
Thompson, Orono. 

Speakers at the Sophomore Prize Declamation Contest 

Leola Bowie Chaplin, Cornish; Philip Hacker Cobb, Denmark; Sum- 
ner Chase Cobb, Portland ; Fred Donald Crowell, Bangor ; Noel Davis 
Godfrey, South Lubec; Walter Converse Jones, Portland; Frances 
Louise Lougee, Winterport; Mary Elizabeth Sargent, Alton. 

Members of Phi Kappa Phi 

Miretta Lydia Bickford, Orono ; Ava Harriet Chadbourne, Matta- 
wamkeag ; Muriel Colbath, Hampden ; James Stuart Crandall, Maiden, 
Mass. ; Raymond Henry Fogler, West Rockport ; Emma Gerhardts, 
W estbrook ; Alleyn Maurice Goodwin, Saco ; Elizabeth Fitzgerald 
Hanly, Thomaston ; Ray Harrison Lindgren, Belfast; Gladys Helen Mer- 
rill, Orono; Harvey Prescott Sleeper, Bangor; Joseph Batchelder Par- 
ker, Bangor; Raymond Trussell Pierce, Bangor; Oscar Milton Wilbur, 
Pembroke ; Earl Lytton Wing, Kingfield ; Rachel Helene Winship, 
Auburn ; Raymond Travena Woolson, Lisbon, N. H. 

Members of Tau Beta Pi 

1915 

James Joseph Brennan, Bangor; Harold Cooper, Auburn; James 
Stuart Crandall, Maiden, Mass.; Alleyn Maurice Goodwin, Saco; Her- 
bert Charles Hodgkins, Waterville ; Harold Walter Leavitt, Monmouth; 
Ray Harrison Lindgren, Belfast; Harris Gates Luther, Hadlyme, Conn.; 

220 



Appointments 

Maurice Roy McKenney, Stillwater; Ervin Barrett Newcomb, Cum- 
berland Mills; Walker Merriam Philbrook, Rockport; Raymond Trus- 
sell Pierce, Bangor; Harry Algernon Randall, South Portland; Harvey 
Prescott Sleeper, Bangor; Robert Freeman Thurrell, Portland; Jede- 
diah Earle Weeks, Wells. 

1916 
Erlon Victor Crimmin, Wintcrport ; Everett Goss Ham, Foxcroft; 
Otis Carroll Lawry, Fairfield; Ansel Alva Packard, Belfast; Omar Fred 
Tarr, Auburn. 

Members oe Alpha Zeta 
1916 
Donald Vince Atwater, Fort Fairfield ; Charles Leon Blackman, 
Peaks Island; Arthur John Bower, Methuen, Mass.; Llewellyn Morse 
Dorsey, Augusta ; Roger Locke Gowell, Poland ; Archie Lewis Ham- 
blen, Gorham ; Fred Perley Loring, West Pownal ; Guy Casley Palmer, 
Patten ; Lawrence Eugene Philbrook, Shelburne, N. H. ; Frederick Robie, 
Gorham. 

1917 
Charles William Bayley, Wells; Daniel Clair Hutchinson, Dover, 
Rudolph Stoehr, Sabattus ; Russell Vale Waterhouse, Kennebunk ; Don- 
ald Stuart Welch, Norway. 

General Honors 

Harold Henry Beverage, North Haven ; Miretta Lydia Bickford, 
Orono; James Joseph Brennan, Bangor; Muriel Colbath, Hampden; 
James Stuart Crandall, Maiden, Mass. ; Raymond Henry Fogler, West 
Rockport ; Emma Gerhardts, Westbrook ; Alleyn Maurice Goodwin, 
Saco ; Ethel Mae Grey, South Penobscot ; Elizabeth Fitzgerald Hanly, 
Thomaston ; Ray Harrison Lindgren, Belfast ; Harris Gates Luther, Had- 
lyme, Conn. ; Gladys Helen Merrill, Orono ; Joseph Batchelder Parker, 
Bangor; Raymond Trussell Pierce, Bangor; Harvey Prescott Sleeper, 
Bangor; Oscar Milton Wilbur, Pembroke; Rachel Helene Winship, 
Auburn. 

Seniors Who Have Satisfactorily Completed the Courses in 
Military Science 

James Stuart Crandall, Maiden, Mass; Stephen Paul Danforth, Fox- 
croft; Park Elliott, Foxcroft; Charles Sherman Erswell, Brunswick; 

221 



Appointments 

Eugene Wiley Goodwin, Rockport ; James Lucius Gulliver, Auburn; 
Ernest Freeman Hanson, Gorham ; Loren Prescott Stewart, Thorndike. 



Organization of the University Battalion of Cadets 

Frank S. Clark, ist Lieutenant Coast Artillery Corps, U. S. Army, 
Professor of Military Science and Tactics 



Adjutant 
Ordnance Officer 
In charge of Band 
Co. A 



Cadet ist Lieutenant H. L. Jenkins 
Cadet ist Lieutenant E. S. Fraser 
Cadet ist Lieutenant L. H. Blood 
Cadet Captain O K. Edes 

Cadet ist Lieutenant A. L. Hamblen 

Cadet ist Lieutenant S. L. Reed 

Cadet 2nd Lieutenant G C. Robinson 



Co. B 



Cadet Captain 
Cadet ist Lieutenant 
Cadet 2nd Lieutenant 
Cadet 2nd Lieutenant 



C M. DeWitt 
N. F. Mank 
J. L. Scribner 
W. B. Littleneld 



Co. C 



Cadet Captain 
Cadet ist Lieutenant 
Cadet 2nd Lieutenant 



R. H. G. Smith 
E. J. Dempsey 
W. F. O'Donoghue 



Co. D 



Cadet Captain 
Cadet ist Lieutenant 
Cadet 2nd Lieutenant 



H. W. Coffin 
G. W. Bell 
LeR. Coombs 



Co. E 



Cadet Captain 
Cadet ist Lieutenant 
Cadet 2nd Lieutenant 
Cadet 2nd Lieutenant 



A A. Packard 
F. W. Gray 
A D. Hay den 
R. J. Travers 



Co. F 



( !adet Captain 

Cadet ist Lieutenant 

( !adet 2nd Lieutenant 

Cadet 2nd Lieutenant 



D. J. Maclntire 
H. G. Lackee 
F. T. Zabe 
R. T. Wilson 



222 



Prizes Awarded 
PRIZES AWARDED 

Kidder Scholarship, Roger Locke Gowell, Poland. 

Western Alumni Scholarship, Lester Walton Hathaway, Bryant Pond. 

New York Alumni Association Scholarship, Earle Leslie Emery, Salis- 
bury Cove. 

Pittsburgh Alumni Association Scholarship, Francis O'Rourke, Saco. 

Junior Exhibition Prizes, Marie Frederica Foster, Sorrento, and Earl 
Stephen Merrill, Orono. 

Sophomore Declamation Prizes, Leola Bowie Chaplin, Cornish, and 
Noel Davis Godfrey, Lubec. 

Father Harrington. Prize, Muriel Colbath, Hampden. 

Holt Prizes, Harold Perry Bailey, Dexter, David Seth Baker, Cara- 
tunk, and William Lucas Wark, Cumberland Mills. 

Walter Balentine Prize, Llewellyn Morse Dorsey, Augusta. 

Franklin Danforth Prize, Raymond Henry Fogler, West Rockport. 

Kennebec County Prize, Harold Henry Beverage, North Haven, 
Harold Eugene Hodgkins, Waterville, and Park Elliott, Foxcroft. 

King Prize, Ansel Alva Packard, Belfast. 

Pharmacy Prize, Morton Leonard Bullard, Dexter. 

Wingard Cup, Norman Sylvester Donahue, Luthersburg, Pa. 



223 



Commencement 



COMMENCEMENT 



The Commencement exercises of 1915 were as follows: 

Saturday, June 5 

5.00 P. M. Annual Meeting" of Phi Kappa Phi, the Library 

6.00 P. M. Annual Banquet of Phi Kappa Phi, Hannibal Hamlin Hall 

8.30 P. M. King Oratorical Prize Contest, the Chapel 

Sunday, June 6 

10.30 A. M. Baccalaureate Address, by Elmer Burritt Bryan, LL. D., 

President of Colgate University, the Chapel 
4.30 P. M. Vesper Service, conducted by Rev. Ashley Auburn Smith, 
B. D., of Bangor, the Chapel 

Monday, June 7 

io.co A. M. Competitive Company Drill and Review of the Cadet Bat- 
talion, Alumni Field 
2.00 P. M. Class Day Exercises, the Chapel 
2.30 P. M. Annual Meeting of the Alumni Advisory Council, the 

Library 
8.00 P. M. "The Amazons," by the Maine Masque, the Gymnasium 

Tuesday, June 8 

9.00 A. M. Concert by the Musical Organizations, the Chapel 
10.00 A. M. "As You Like It," by Women Students 
10.00 A. M. Animal Meeting of the College of Law Alumni Associa- 
tion, Stewart Hall 

4.30 to 6.30 P. M. Alumni Luncheon, the Gymnasium 

224 



Commencement 

4.30 to 6.30 P. M. Alumnae Luncheon, the Chapel 

6.30 P. M. Annual Meeting of the General Alumni Association, the 

Chapel 
7.30 to 9.30 P. M. President's Reception, the Library 

Wednesday, June 9 

9.30 A. M. Commencement Exercises, the Campus ; Address by Hon 

Samuel Walker McCall, LL. D., of Winchester, Mass. 
12.00 M. Commencement Dinner, the Gymnasium 
8.00 P. M. Commencement Ball, the Gymnasium 



225 

15 



Degrees Conferred 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

Bachelor of Science 

Wilbur Cole Aageson (Dairy Husbandry) Thomaston 

Douglas Marsh Beale (Horticulture) Orono 

George Hench Bernheisel (Animal Husbandry) ...New Bloomfield, Pa. 

Joseph Henry Bodwell (Animal Husbandry) Methuen, Mass. 

Earle Maurice Brockway (Forestry) Dexter 

Norman Sylvester Donahue (Agronomy) Luthersburg, Pa. 

Chauncey Hazen Douglas (Forestry) Peabody, Mass. 

Ralph Barrows Easson (Poultry Husbandry) South Paris 

Harry Willard Fogg, (Forestry) .Hull's Cove 

Raymond Henry Fogler (Biology) West Rockport 

Henry Winslow Fowler (Forestry) Berlin, N. H. 

Emma Gerhardts (Home Economics) Westbrook 

Leslie Atheson Hamel (Agronomy) Portland 

William Barlow Hill (Forestry) Gorham 

Clement Ames Lyon (Agronomy) East Bridgewater, Mass. 

Chester Harold Norton (Forestry) Chelsea, Mass. 

Joseph Batchelder Parker (Dairy Husbandry) Bangor 

Montford Elmer Patten (Forestry) Carmel 

Earl Francis Perry (Biology) Bangor 

Willis Thurston Pettey (Poultry Husbandry) South Paris 

John Harvey Philbrick (Dairy Husbandry) Corinna 

William Wason Redman (Agronomy) ) Dedham, Mass. 

Abram Ira Schwey (Horticulture) Portland 

Philip Harris Walters (Animal Husbandry) Readfield 

Paul Alanson Warren (Biology) Dover 

Oscar Milton Wilbur (Horticulture) Pembroke 

Rachel Helene Winship (Home Economics) Auburn 

226 



Degrees Conferred 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Bachelor of Arts 

James Abraham Adams (Mathematics) Orono 

Miretta Lydia Bickford ( Latin) Orono 

Rosemary Agnes Brennan (German) Bangor 

Neva Browning (English) Orono 

Ava Harriet Chadbourne (Education) Mattawamkeag 

Robert Pinkham Clark (Economics) Lincoln 

Stephen Caldwell Clement (English) Belfast 

Muriel Colbath (English) Hampden 

Olive Erdine Coombs (Latin) North Isleboro 

Stephen Paul Danforth (English) Foxcrof r 

Lucretia Almira Davis (Romance Languages) Old Town 

Raymond Donald Douglass (Mathematics) Gorham 

Joseph Edward Doyle (Biology) Danvers, Mass. 

Russell Sweetser Ferguson (Biology) New York, N. Y. 

M.aurice Arthur Fletcher (German) „. . .Wilton 

Mildred Webster Flower (Latin) East Kingston, N. H. 

Madison Leavitt Gilman (Economics.) W T oodfords 

Earl Corson Goodwin (Economics) Oakland 

Ethel Mae Grey (Latin) South Penobscot 

James Lucius Gulliver (Economics) Auburi. 

Elizabeth Fitzgerald Hanly (English) Thomaston 

Ernest Freeman Hanson (Economics) Gorham 

Herbert Wilder Hayford (German) Dover 

Mary Elizabeth Burns Hines (Latin) Middletown, Conn. 

Margaret Lillis Holyoke (Biology) Brewer 

M.ollie Chase Hutchins (German) Fryeburg 

William Hope Martin (Biology) Carlisle, Pa. 

Gladys Helen Merrill (Romance Languages) Orono 

Lester Howe Morrell (Economics) Lewiston 

David Weaver Parks (Physics) Fort Fairfield 

Lloyd Francis Pinkham (Economics) Lewiston 

Frances Gertrude Smart (Romance Languages) ( La Grange 

Lewis Brewster Tolman (Economics) Bangor 

Gladys Treat (German) Winterport 

Ross Harold Varney (Economics) .Haverhill, Mass. 

James Clifford Walker ( Physics) Portland 

227 



Degrees Conferred 

Bachelor of Pedagogy 
Elmer Harrison Webber Livermore Falls 

COLLEGE OF LAW 

Bachelor of Laws 

George Robert Ashworth Waldoboro 

Jay Hobart Frizzell Groveton, N. H. 

Clark Bradley Frost Gorham, N. H. 

Ellen Morancy Mary Eloar Barre, Vt. 

Walter Ellwyn Mathews [A. B., Bates, 191 1] Saint Albans 

Howard Clifton Moody North Monmouth 

Cornelius Joseph O'Leary Bangor 

Frank Adams Tirrell, Jr Quincy, Mass. 

Merrill Edson Torrey Easthampton, Mass. 

Ernest Linwood Weaver Ashland 

¥1 erbert John Welch Portland 

Clarence Alden Whitney Portland 

Earl Lytton Wing [A. B., Bowdoin, 1910] Kingfield 

Raymond Travena Woolson Lisbon, N. H. 

COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Bachelor of Science 

Charles Stanley Allen (Civil Engineering) Augusta 

Harold Perry Bailey ( Chemistry) Dexter 

David Seth Baker (Civil Engineering) Caratunk 

Merton Ford Banks (Civil Engineering) Biddefor-i 

Harry Lewis Bayer (Civil Engineering) Bangor 

Harold Henry Beverage (Electrical Engineering) North Haven 

Lswrence Allen Blaisdell (Electrical Engineering) Lynn, Mass. 

William Edward Bowler (Electrical Engineering) Spencer, Mass. 

Alfred Orman Bragg (Chemical Engineering) Portland 

James Joseph Brennan (Chemical Engineering) Bangor 

Winthrop Blakely Brown (Chemistry) Portland 

William Harold Buck (Civil Engineering) Ansonia, Conn. 

Fred Elton Chapman (Electrical Engineering) Lake Hermon 

E rnest Alfred Clifford (Civil Engineering) Brunswick 

228 



Degrees Conferred 

Everett Bickfprd Coffin (Civil Engineering) Brunswick 

Edward Warren Conners (Civil Engineering) Old Town 

Harold Cooper (Mechanical Engineering) Auburn 

Albert Leo Coyne (Civil Engineering) Worcester, Mass. 

James Stuart Crandall (Civil Engineering) Maiden, Mass. 

Maynard Joshua Creighton (Chemical Engineering) Thomaston 

Russell Milton Crispin (Civil Engineering) West Somerville, Mass. 

Leon John Croteau (Civil Engineering) Holbrook, Mass. 

Walter James Dolan (Chemistry) Worcester, Mass. 

Edward Albert Dore (Chemical Engineering) Bangor 

Park Elliott (Electrical Engineering) Foxcroit 

Norman Eudell Emmons (Electrical Engineering) Chester, Conn. 

Harold Mahlon Fish (Civil Engineering) Farmington 

Chester Hamlin Goldsmith (Chemistry) Beverly, Mass. 

Alleyn Maurice Goodwin (Electrical Engineering) Saco 

Forest Chandler Gordon (Chemical Engineering) Auburn 

Preston Martin Hall (Chemical Engineering) Taunton, Mass. 

Laurence Herbert Haskell (Civil Engineering) Lynn, Mass. 

Frederic Boynton Hatch (Civil Engineering) Pemaquid Harbor 

Harold Eugene Hodgkins (Electrical Engineering) Waterville 

Herbert Charles Hodgkins (Electrical Engineering) Waterville 

Albert Fletcher Hutchinson (Chemistry) North Dexter 

Everett Palmer Ingalls (Civil Engineering) Bridgton 

Harold Libby Jones (Civil Engineering) Corinna 

Roland Gerry Kimball (Pharmacy) , Norway 

Harold Walter Leavitt (Civil Engineering) Monmouth 

Ray Harrison Lindgren (Civil Engineering) Belfast 

Harris Gates Luther (Mechanical Engineering) Hadlyme, Conn. 

Carl Magnus (Chemical Engineering) Biddeford 

Maurice Roy McKenney (Electrical Engineering) Stillwater 

William Henshaw Mellen (Mechanical Engineering) Athol, Mass. 

James Edward Mullaney (Civil Engineering) Somerville, Mass. 

Malcolm Hay ford Oak ( Chemistry) Caribou 

Philip Edwin Philbrook (Mechanical Engineering) Woodfords 

Walker Merriam Philbrook (Electrical Engineering) Rockport 

Raymond Trussell Pierce (Electrical Engineering) Bangor 

Harry Algernon Randall (Electrical Engineering) ....South Portland 

James Stuart Randall (Civil Engineering) Whitman, Mass. 

Walter Henry Rogers (Chemistry) Topsham 

Leon George Sawyer (Electrical Engineering) Bridgton 

229 



Degrees Conferred 

Merle Branard Shaw (Chemical Engineering) Orono 

Harvey Prescott Sleeper (Electrical Engineering) Bangor 

Paul Frederick Slocum (Civil Engineering) New York, N. Y. 

Loren Prescott Stewart (Civil Engineering) Thorndike 

Robert Freeman Thurrell (Electrical Engineering) Portland 

Harry Alton Titcomb (Mechanical Engineering) South Paris 

William Lucas Wark (Mechanical Engineering) Cumberland Mills 

Jedediah Earle Weeks (Civil Engineering) Wells 

Gerald Cushman Welch (Civil Engineering) Oakland 

Harold Chandler White (Chemical Engineering) Bangor 

Thomas Boardman Whitney (Civil Engineering) Caribou 

Harry Duncan Williams (Civil Engineering) Readfield 

Edmund Nugent Woodsum (Mechanical Engineering) Stillwater 

Pharmaceutical Chemist 

Morton Leonard Bullard Dexter 

John Wynne Burke Randolph 

John Raymond de la Cruz Colombia, S. A. 

Allan Philputt Gillis Lubec 

Oscar Johnson Monson 

Daniel Edwin Lawton Southwest Harbor 

Arthur Malloch Lubec 

Percy Daniel Rowe Island Falls 

ADVANCED DEGREES 

Master of Arts 
Marion Stephanie Buzzell (Education) [B. A., 1914] Old Town 

Master of Sciemce 

John Whittemore Gowen (Biology) [B. S., 1914] Arlington, Mass. 

Civil Engineer 

Bertram Eugene Ames [B. S., 1905] Lynn, Mass. 

Herbert Putman Bruce [B. S., 1910] Nahant, Mass. 

Ashton Halsted Hart [B. S., 191 1] Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mellen Cleaveland Wiley [B. S., 1903] Chicago, 111. 

Mechanical Engineer 

Raymond Thurber Cole [B. S., 1910I Worcester, Mass. 

230 



Degrees Conferred 

CERTIFICATES 

In Home Economics 

Frances Edith Dugan Bangor 

Frances Myrtle J ones Banger 

Alice Marguerite Lewis Gardiner 

Eunice Hale N iles Hallowell 

Hazelwood Scrimgeour Lewiston 

In the School Course in Agriculture 

[Awarded April 30] 

Merle Raymond Adams Canton Point 

David Crowell Dorchester, Mass. 

Philip Murray Dearborn Cape Elizabeth 

Richard Chandler Eaton Exeter 

Theodore Orson Fisk Worcester, Mass. 

Harry Sawyer Hawkes Cumberland Center 

Rupert Stacy Norton Kezar Falls 

Ralph Packard Norridgewock 

Frank Merrill Walker Saco 

Mary Ellen Willard Llanerch, Fa. 

DEGREES OUT OF COURSE 

Bachelor of Science 

Ralph Victor Fifield (Civil Engineering) Huntley, Mont. 

[as of the Class of 1905] 

Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering 

Edwin Reuel Merrill Dayton, Ohio- 

[as of the Class of 1891] 



231 



Catalog of Students 



CATALOG OF STUDENTS 



Major subjects are indicated as follows: Ag. Agronomy, An. Animal 
Industry, Be. Biological Chemistry, Bl. Biology, Ch. Chemistry, Ch. 
Eng. Chemical Engineering, Ce. Civil Engineering, Dh. Dairy Hus- 
bandry, Es. Economics, Ed. Education, Ee. Electrical Engineering, Eh. 
English, Fy. Forestry, Fr. French, Gm. German, Gk. Greek, Hy. History, 
He. Home Economics, Ht. Horticulture, Lt. Latin, Ms. Mathematics, 
Me. Mechanical Engineering, Ph. Poultry Husbandry, Pm. Pharmacy, 
PI. Philosophy, Pp. Plant Pathology, Ps. Physics, Si. Spanish and 
Italian. 



GRADUATE STUDENTS 



Bartlett, Emily Mary, B. A., Bl. Orono 

University of Maine, 1912 
Beaupre, Estelle Inez, B. A., Gm. Bangor 

University of Maine, 1914 
Lickford, Miretta Lydia, B. A., Hy. Orono 

University of Maine, 1915 
Carleton, Edward Frazier, B. A., South Groveland, Mass. 

Fr. University of Maine, 191 2 
Clark, Frank Sheldon, B. S., Ee. Orono 

Norwich University, 1909 
Clarke, George Clarence, B. A., Ms. Portland 

University of Maine, 1913 
Coffin, Celia May, B. A., Eh. Bangor 

University of Maine, 1912 
Conley, Albert Davis, B. S., Ch. E., Orono 

Ch. University of Maine, 191 1, 1914 
Cushman, William Parsons, B. S., Northeast Harbor 
Ps. University of Maine, 1911 



College Street 



Main Street 



North Main Street 



232 



Catalog of Students 



Davis, Ellen, B. A., Eh. 

Smith College. 191 5 
Davis, Lucretia Almira, B. A., Fr. Old Town 

University of Maine, 1915 
Donegan, James John, Ph. B., Ce. 

Yale University, 1909 
Douglass, Raymond Donald, B. A., 
Ms. University of Maine, 1915 
Durgin, Albert Guy, B. S., M. S., 
Ch. University of Maine, 1908, 
Estabrooke, Carl Bertrand, B. A., 
Hy. University of Maine, 191 2 
Faulkner, Caro Beverage, B. A., 

Gm. Colby College, 1907 
Floyd, Raymond, B. A., Gm. 

University of Maine, 1913 
French, Norman Richards. B. A., 

Ps. University of Maine, 1914 
Fuller, William David, Ph. B., Ed. 

University of Wisconsin, 1910 
Goldsmith, Chester Hamlin, B. S., 

Ch. University of Maine, 1915 
Grahame, Ruth Armstrong, B. A., 

Hy. Park College, Mo., 1914 
Hoyt, Amos Courrier, B. A., Es. 

Ohio Wesleyan University, 
Kelley, Margaret June, B. A., Gm. 

University of Maine, 1912 
Lane, Frederick William, B. S., Orono 
Ch. Mass. Institute of Technology, 1914 
Lane, Willis Carl, B. Sc, Bl. Orono 

Ohio State University, 1915 
Lucas, Warren Stanhope, B. A., Thomaston 

Ms. University of Maine, 1914 
Lurie, Alexander, B. S., Bl. Orono 

Cornell University, 1914. 
Merrill, Ann Margaret, B. A., Gm. Washington, D. C. 

University of Maine, 1908 
Monohon, Paul Wheeler, B. S., Orono 
Ag. University of Maine, 1914 



Old Town 


Old Town 


Old Town 


Old Town 


Orono 


Mill Street 


Gcrhani 


ATA House 


Orono 


Middle Street 


1909 




Orono 


College Street 


Greene 


Bennoch Street 


Brewer 


University Inn 


Orono 


205 H. H. Hall 


Old Town 


Old Town 


Orono 


College Street 


Orono 


North Main Street 


North Anson 




1912 




Bangor 52 


Essex Street, Bangor 



Park Street 
408 Oak Hall 

23 Mill Street 

108 H. H. Hall 



233 



Catalog of Students 



Patterson, Sidney Winfield, B. S., 

Bl. University of Maine, 1914 
Paul, Seneca Arthur, LL. B., Law 

Boston Y. M. C. A. Law 

Phinney, Chester Squire, B. A., 

Gm. University of Maine, 1915 

Philbrick, John Harvey, B. S., Bl. 

University of Maine, 1915 
Rao, Ramanathapur Sitarama, B. 
Sc, Ch. University of Bombay, 
Redman, William Wason, B. S., Pp. 

University of Maine, 1915 
Rogers, Walter Henry, B. S., Ch. 

University of Maine, 1915 
Sawyer, Edward Eugene, B. A., 
Ch. University of Maine, 1912 
St. Marie, Adrian Archibald 
Achilles, B. S., Ch. 

University of Minnesota, 1914 
Sherwood, Neil Carpenter, B. S., 

Bl. University of Maine, 1914 
Stanley, Winthrop Hamor, B. A., 

Ch. University of Maine, 1910 

Tobey, Elmer Robert, B. S., Ch. 

University of Maine, 191 1 

Webber, Elmer Harrison, B. Pd., 

Ed. University of Maine, 191 5 

Whitmore, Albert Amos, B. S., 

Hy. University of Maine, 1906 
Wilbur, Oscar Milton, B. S., Bl. 
University of Maine, 1915 
Woods, Roscoe, B. A., Ms. 

Georgetown College, 1914 
Verder, Daniel Hugh, B. A., M. 
A, Eh. 

Trinity College, 1899 



Orono 



301 H. H. Hall 



East Corinth 

29 George Street, Bangor 
School, 1915 
Duxbury, Mass. 



Corinna 



Campus 



Bangalore, India l6 Bennoch Street 
India, 1913 
Dedham, Mass. 2 X House 

Orono <£ H K House 

Old Town 

Orono Park Street 

Orono Dairy Building 

Westbrook 

Orono Pond Street 

Livermore Falls 

Orono University Inn 

Pembroke Campus 

Orono 28 Bennoch Street 

Mattapoisett, Mass. 



234 



Catalog of Students 



SENIORS 



Ashton, Harold Dudley, Ce. 
Atwater, Donald Vince, Bl. 
Barrett, Basil Edward, Es. 
Barrows, Lewis Orin, Pm. 
Barry, James Edward, Es. 
Bartlett, Robert Whitney, Ch. 
Bell, Roger Warren, Ce. 
Blackman, Charles Leon, An. 
Blanchard, Ensor Harding, Ce. 

Blanchard, Robert Germain, Ce. 
Blood, Lewis Henry, Ch. 
Bonney, Timothy Doten, Ms. 
Boothby, Horace Everett, Jr., Ht. 
Bower, Arthur John, An. 
Bradbury, Burke, Ee. 
Brown, Brooks, Dh. 
Brown, Walter True, Me. 
Buckley, Forest LeRoy, Ce. 
Burkett, Franz Upham, Law 

A. B., Bowdoin College, 191 1 
Butters, Arthur Edwin, Es. 
Caus 1 and, Kenneth Martin, Ee. 
Coffin, Harold Wilhelm, Ee. 
Colbath, Orman Schuyler, Bl. 
Colvin, Zella Elizabeth, Ms. 

Condon, Guy Berwyn, Es. 
Cookson, Ernest Loren, Ped. 
Coombs, LeRoy, Eh. 
Crahmer, Harris Sampson, Law 
Crimmin, Erlon Victor, Ee. 
Crommett, Earle Erweed, Law 
Currier, Doris, Gm. 
Currier, Karl Moody, Ch. Eng. 
Curtis, Fred Holmes, Gm. 
Damren, Fred Llewellyn, Bl. 
DeBeck, Mary Muriel, Lt. 



Springfield, Mass. K 2 House 

Fort Fairfield 2 X House 

Bluehill 2 X House 

Newport B6II House 

Bangor 168 Grove Street, Bangor 
Westficld, Mass. A X A House 

Arlington, Mass. K 2 House 

Peaks Island Park Street 

Buenos Aires, Argentina, S. A. 

Forest Avenue 
Cumberland Center A X A House 
Foxcroft 2 A E House 

Mexico 6 X House 

Methuen, Mass. 2 A E House 

Methuen, Mass. 2 A E House 

Old Town <£ r A House 

Dover ATA House 

West Bath 109 H. H. Hall 

Leeds 101 H. H. Hall 

Union 62 Court Street, Bangor 



Old Town 
Freeport 
Portland 
Hampden 



Old Town 

K 2 House 

9 X House 

ATA House 



Williamsburg, Ind. 

Mt. Vernon House 
South Penobscot 2 X House 

Albion Park Street 

Portland 2 A E House 

Bangor 204 4th Street, Bangor 

Winterport 101 Oak Hall 

Ridlonville 38 Winter Street, Bangor 
Brewer Mt. Vernon House 

Brewer <£ K 2 House 

Addison A T fi House 

Auburn <£ H K House 

Franklin Balentine Hall 



23s 



Catalog of Students 



DeWitt, Carro'l Me'.bourne, Es. 
Dodge, John Maynard, Me. 
Darrah, Floyd Mason, Law 
Dole, Charles Edmund, Es. 
Dorsey, Llewellyn Morse, Dh. 
Driscoll, Michael Columbus, Fr. 
Dubee, John Raymond, Law 

Eaton, George Franklin, Law 
Eddy, Emery Davis, Bl. 
Edes, Omar Kelsey, Es. 
Edminster, Winfred Herbert, Bl. 
Elliott, James Carroll, Dh. 
Emerson, Walter Davis, Me. 
Fairchild, Thomas Everett, Ph. 
Fannon, Ralph William, Ch. Eng. 
Faulkner, William Thomas, Es. 
Folsom, Charles Herbert, Ce. 
Forsyth, Nathaniel Frederick, Es. 
Foster, Hoyt Davis, Fed. 
Foster, Marie Frederica, Ms. 
Fraser, Elwood Stuart, Dh. 
Frawley, Isabel Frances, Rm. 
Garakian, John Abraham, Law 
B. A., Robert College, 1909 
Glover, John White, Me. 
Gowell, Roger Locke, Dh. 
Grant, Philip Burr, Lt. 
Gray, Frank William, An. 
Cray, Granville Chase, Law 
Greenleaf, Florence Evelyn, He. 
Ham, Everett Goss, Ch. Eng. 
Hamblen, Archelaus Lewis, Ht. 
Hamilton, Guy Bradford, Dh. 
Harvey, Joseph Edmond, Law 
Hunt, Lawrence Milliken, Ch. Eng. 
Jones, Marguerite, He. 
Jordan, Maynard Fred, Ms. 
Kirk, George Edwin, Es. 
Kriger, Lewis Herman, An. 



Brewer <J> K 2 House 

Boothbay <£ H K House 

Portland 42 Holland Street, Bangor 
Bangor B 9 n House 

Augusta 2 A E House 

North Abington, Mass. Campus 
Haverhill, Mass. 

176 Court Street, Bangor 
103 Fourth Street, Bangor 
$ T A House 



Bangor 

Bangor 

Dexter 

Dixmont 

North Rumford 

Orono 

Livermore Falls 

Applcton, Wis. 

Greene 

Dexter 

Orrington 

Deer Isle 

Bar Harbor 

Peaks Island 

Bangor 



$ r A House 

412 H. H. Hall 

301 H. H. Hall 

Park Street 

<J> K 2 House 

$ T A House 

28 Bennoch Street 

308 H. H. Hall 

Orrington 

Park Street 

Balentine Hall 

Park Street 

Balentine Hall 



Bangor 28 Second Street, Bangor 



Rockland 

Poland 

Unity 

Jacksonville 

Brewer 26 

Auburn 

Foxcroft 

Gorham 

Portland 

Saco 60 

Old Town 

W a 1 dob or 

Islcsford 

Bar Harbor 

Portland 



2 X House 

201 Oak Hah 

411 H. H. Hall 

ATA House 

Wilson Street, Brewer 

Mt. Vernon House 

2 X House 

ATA House 

A X A House 

Court Street, Bangor 

<I> T A House 

North Hall 

103 H. H. Hall 

Pine Street 

412 H. H. Hall 



236 



Catalog of Students 



Kritter, Julius Henry, Ce. 
1 ,ackee, Hobart Goold, Me. 
Lane, Charles Kent, Ch. Eng. 
Lanpher, Stacy Clifford, Law 
Lawry, Otis Carroll, Ch. 
Leecock, John Thomas, Es. 
Legal, Chapin, Ht. 
Lewis, Benjamin West, Ee. 
Libby, Clarence Earl, Ch. Eng. 
Libby, Herschel Scott, Ped. 
Loring, Fred Perley, Ag. 
Lovely, Harry Richard, Fy. 
Macdonald, Irving Clifford, Gm. 
Maclntire, Donald Josiah, Dh. 
McParland, Bernard Joseph, Law 
Mangan, Thomas Gerald, Ee. 
Mansfield, Everett Keith, Ch. Eng. 
Mason, Walter Lee, Ps. 
Mathews, Norman Lyle, Ag. 
Mayers, Howard Winfield, Ce. 
Merrill, Earl Stephen, Bl. 
Merrill, Philip Knight, Es. 
Moody, Charles Leo, Ht. 
Moore, Ralph Lee, Ce. 
Moore, Robert McGregor, Me. 
Moren, Miller Bernard, Law 

Morris, Lester George, Dh. 
Morrison, Mildred Cora, Fr. 
Mulloney, Lawrence Edmund, Me. 
Nickerson, Arno Wilbur, Ch. Eng. 
Nugent, William Robert, Ce. 
O'Neil, Harry Dennis, Eh. 
O'Rourke, Francis, Ch. Eng. 
Packard, Ansel Alva, Ee. 
Packard, Marlborough, Ce. 
Palmer, Guy Casley, An. 
Park, Minnie May, He. 
Peabody, Myron Columbus, An. 



Bradford, Mass. A T Q House 

Woodfords ATA House 

Rockland, Mass. K 2 House 
Foxcroft 10 Chester Place, Bangor 

Fairfield B 9 IT House 
North Andover, Mass. ATA House 

Calais Grove Street 

Boothbay Harbor B O II House 

Albion ~ 308 H. H. Hall 

Berry Mills Myrtle Street 

West Pownal 2 A E House 

Gardiner <& V A House 

Portland $ H K House 

Biddeford 2 A E House 
Bangor 16 Sanford Street, Bangor 

Pittsfield, Mass. 101 H. H. Hall 

Fryeburg X House 

Orono Mill Street 

Waterville 6 X House 

Dresden ATA House 

Orono Campus 

Portland ATA House 

North Monmouth Campus 

Hallowcll 2 A E House 

Biddeford $ K 2 House 
Lowville, N. Y . 

64 Sanford St., Bangor 

Bingham A T Q House 

Bar Harbor Balentine Hall 

Portland A T House 

Brewer 6 X House 

Portland 101 H. H. Hall 

Bangor 2 A E House 

Saco ATI) House 

Belfast A X A House 

Sebec Lake 103 H. H. Hall 

Patten K 2 House 

Orono Pine Street 

Exeter 2 X House 



237 



Catalog of Students 



Peterson, Harry Leland, Law 

Phelps, Ferdinand Zanoni, Ch. 
Philbrook, Lawrence Eugene, An. 
Plummer, Marian Elizabeth, He. 
Potter, Elmer Deming, Eh. 
Prentice, William Henry, Me. 
Purington, Clinton Everett. Es. 
Quine, James Patrick, Law 
Reed, Harold LeRoy, Law 

Rendall, Raymond Eaton, Fy. 
Rich, William Raymond, Ch. 
Robie, Frederick, Ht. 
Robinson, Madeline Frances, Fr. 
Rogers, William Nathaniel, Law 
Rollins, Harry Elwood, Ed. 
Rudman, Samuel, Ce. 
Ruffner, Charles William, Dh. 
Russell, Sibyl Lois, He. 
Sanborn, Oscar Harold, An. 
Sawyer, Grace Ruth, Fr. 
Shaw, Earle Eaton, Fy. 
Sherman, Albion Franklin, Es. 
Silva, Richard Leslie, Es. 
Singleton, Sarah, Law 
Skillin, Clifford Augustus, Me. 
Small, Norman Clifford, Ce. 
Smith, Allen G., Me. 
Somes, Raymond Percival, Es. 
Stoddard, Winfred Eugene, Ed. 
Stone, Harry Edward, Ee. 
Tarr, Omar Fred, Ch. Eng. 
Taylor, Charles Sumner, Law 
Thompson, Dorothy, Gm. 
Thompson, Gladys, Gm. 
Totman, James Emmons, Ag. 
Towle, Horace Hamblen, Jr., Law 

Webber, Walter Waitstill, Ch 



Danielson, Conn. 

101 Sanford Street, Bangor 
Foxboro, Mass. 2 X House 

Shelbume, N. H. B n House 

Old Town Mt. Vernon Houst. 

Topsham 9 X House 

Round Pond 302 Oak Hall 

Portland K 2 House 

Bangor 184 Forest Avenue, Bangor 
Northeast Harbor 

60 Court Street, Bangor 
Melrose, Mass. 9 X House 

Gorham ATA Flouse 

Gorham K 2 House 

Bangor 465 Main Street, Bangor 
Bangor 151 West Broadway, Bangor 
Bangor $ K 2 House 

Bangor 159 Hancock Street, Bangor 
Arcadia, Pa. K 2 House 

Orono 88 Main Street 

Weld Campus 

Old Town Old Town 

Orono College Street 

Bar Harbor K 2 House 

Provincetown, Mass. Campus 

Bangor 393 State Street, Bangor 
South Portland 9 X House 

Farming ton <3? K 2 House 

Bluehill 402 H. H. Hall 

Southwest Harbor $ K 2 House 
Deer Isle Campus 

Cornish 212 Oak Hall 

Auburn 9 X House 

Deer Isle 103 Pine Street, Bangor 
Orono Main Street 

Orono Main Street 

Sidney $ H K House 

Portland 

380 Hammond Street, Bangor 
Lcwiston B9II House 



238 



Catalog of Students 



Weeks, Thomas Nathan, Law 

Whittemore, James Arthur, Fy. 
Whittier, John Lowell, An. 
Winship, Evelyn, Eh. 
Woods, Basil Gibson, Eh. 



Win slow 

116 Sanford Street, Bangor 
Bangor B B IT House 

Biddcford $ K S House 

Liver more Falls Mt. Vernon House 
Bangor R. F. D. 7, Bangor, Maine 



JUNIORS 



Aikins, Frederick Harlow, Dh. 
Amos, Luther Newell, Ee. 
Andrews, Harold Pierce, Fy. 
Baldwin, Dudley, Law 
Barnes, John Lycurgus, Me. 
Bartlett, Burton Elliott, Ch. 
Bauer, Ada Augusta, Eh. 
Bayley, Charles William, Dh. 
Beckler, Warren Bigelow, Jr., Ch. 

Eng. 
Bell, George Tolar Whitman, Es. 

Berger, Samuel Solomon, Ch. Eng. 
Bernstein, Louis Abraham, Ce. 
Berry, Leroy Nahum, An. 
Billings, Welford Parsons, Fy. 
Blair, Wellington Arthur, Law 
Blanchard, Arthur Nile, An. 
Brackett, Altie Franklin, Ee. 
Brasseur, Ralph Baldwin, Ce. 
Brawn, Earl Robertson, Ee. 
Brawn, Worthen Earle, Ch. Eng. 
Pridgham, Donald Greenwood, An. 
Bridgham, Wade Lawrence, Law 

Bright, Elizabeth Mason, Bl. 
Bristol, Grace Bidwell, He. 

Brown, Cecil Earle, Law 
Brown, Clifford, Ce. 
Brown, Ruth Ellen, Eh. 



South Windham 

Houlton 

Monmouth 

Cherryfield 

Intervale, N. H. 

Orono 

Pittsfield, Mass. 

Wells 

Auburn 



210 H. H. Hall 

Bennoch Street 

210 H. H. Hall 

253 Union Street 

6 X House 

BBn House 

North Hall 

409 H. H. Hall 

301 Oak Hall 



Newtonville, Mass. 

North Main Street 
Lawrence, Mass. 204 H. H. Hall 
Auburn 212 Oak Hah 

South Bridgton 112 H. H. Hall 

East Eddington 103 H. H. Hall 
Waterville 176 Court Street, Bangor 
Cumberland Center A X A House 
Berwick A T Q House 

Bradford, Mass. <i> K 2 House 
So. Portland Campus 

Bath 109 H. H. Hall 

Auburn 301 Oak Hall 

Bridgton 

148 Kenduskeag Ave., Bangor 
Bangor Mt. Vernon House 

West Hartford, Conn. 

Mt. Vernon House 
Norway The Colonial, Bangor 

Portland $ T A House 

Brewer Mt. Vernon House 



239 



Catalog ot Students 



Callahan, Raymond Murray, An. 
Carter, Ray Milo, Ch. 
Chadbourne, Paul Everett, Me. 
Chaplin, Leola Bowie, Eh. 
Clapp, Elwood Irvin, Ch. Eng. 
Cobb, Sumner Chase, Ms. 
Collins, Parkman Abbott, Bl. 
Coombs, Jessie Willett, Ped. 
Copp, Lincoln Brackett, Es. 
Corridon, John Henry, Law 
Cram, Abram Cousins, Es. 
Crossland, Charles Edward, An. 
Crowell, Fred Donald, Es. 
Crowley, Wallace Edgar, Law 
Currier, Harold Newcomb, Ch. 

Eng. 
Danforth, Helen Lois, Gm. 
Dempsey, Edmund James, Ch. 
Dickey, Clarence Watson, Ped. 
Dole, George Elmer, Bl. 
Dufncy, Edward Charles, Law 
Dunn, Arthur Wilfred, Ht. 
Dutton, Philip Smith, Bl. 
Ellis, Alfreda, He. 
Emerson, Percy Daniel, Ce. 
Emery, Charles Irving, Ms. 
Emery, Earle Leslie, An. 
Emery, Marion, He. 
Falvey, John Michael, Fr. 
Fickett, Ernest Leslie, Me. 
Fides, Avery Meader, An. 
Fletcher, Robert Kemble, Bl. 
Ford, Perley Harvey, Law 

Fox, George Edward, Ch. Eng. 
Fraser, Ralph Ervin, Me. 
Freese, Langdon Jackson, Ee. 
French, Frank Alexander, Es. 



Sabattus 9 X House 

West Hawley, Mass. Spearen's Inn 
Biddeford $ K 2 House 

Cornish Balentine Hall 

Brewer Brewer 

Woodfords $ K 2 House 

Readfield Depot 9 X House 

Waldoboro Balentine Hall 

Cornish no H. H. Hall 

Portland 84 Cedar Street, Bangor 
Limerick 402 H. H. Hall 

Lawrence, Mass. Pierce Street 

Bangor B 9 n House 

Bangor 10 Chester Place, Bangor 

Brewer $ K 2 House 

Bangor Mt. Vernon House 

Mattapan, Mass. 2 X House 

Monroe Park Street 

Haverhill, Mass. 9 X House 

Rumford 84 Cedar Street, Bangor 
Yarmouthville 9 X House 

Steuben A T fi Flouse 

Belfast North Hall 

Biddeford A T Q House 

Salisbury Cove Campus 

SaHsbury Cove Grove Street 

Limerick North Hall 

South Berwick A T Q House 

Brewer 9 X House 

Orr's Island $ H K House 

Orono North Main Street 

Mechanic Falls 

17 Fourth Street Bangor 
Glen's Falls, N. Y. A T O House 
Prcsque Isle <I> H K House 

Bangor K 2 House 

Wappinger's Falls, N. Y. 

9 X House 



240 



Catalog of Students 



. Laurel Osgood, Gm. 
Gilman, Madison Lcavitt, Law 

Gilpatrick, Verner Elisha, Es. 
Godfrey, Noel Davis, 
Gonyer, Frances Louise, Fr. 
Gorham, William Joseph, Es. 

Grant, Benjamin Elwell, Es. 
■ miel Emerson, An. 
enwood, Russell Sanford, An. 
Gribben, Benjamin Herbert, Es. 
Guiou, Elty Chester, Ce. 
Hanly, Edward Kavanaugh, Fy. 
Ffan sen. George Edward, Fy. 
Harding, Raymond Hawthorne, 

Ch. Eng. 
Harmon, Erald, Law 
Harmon, Frank Lorenzo, Ee. 
Harrison. Mary Violetta, Gm. 
Hartwell, Walter Traver, Dh. 
Haskell, Herbert Vaughn, Law 
Haskell, Weston Bradford, Dh. 
Hayden, Alfred Dorr, Ee. 
Herrick, Carleton Sewall, Es. 
Higgins, Dorrice Mae, Fr. 
Higgins, Royal Grant, Jr., Ms. 
Hill, Mark Langdon, Ch. Eng. 
Hiller, Howard Bryant, An. 
Hilton, Cecil Max, Ce. 
Hogan, Louis William, Ee. 
Mollis, Harold William, Law 

Hooker, Earl Dewey, Law 

Hopkins, Bryant Lealand, Ce. 
Howard, Flora Adelaide, He. 

Hunt, Lilian Crosby, Eh. 
Hurd, Everett St. Claire, Ee. 



■ villc 
Augu 

300 Hammond 

(Jrono 

South Lubec 

Orono 2 

Wilkes Barre, Pa. 

Cumberland Mills 

Brewer 

Presque Isle 

Portland 

Orono 

Thomaston 

Worcester, Mass. 



a t n j 1 

Street, Bangor 
Bennoch Street 

Park Street 
Bennoch Street 

K 2 House 

2 x House 

112 H. H. Hall 

Stillwater 

Campus 

Main Street 
University Inn 
412 H. H. Hall 



Kennebunk 2 A E House 

Westbrook 176 Court Street, Bangor 
Corinna <V H K House 

Freeport College Street 

Upper Troy, N. Y. Main Street 
Lincoln 103 Pine Street, Bangor 



BGII House 

A X A House 

K 2 House 

Mt. Vernon House 

Campus 

B n House 

2 A E House 

<P K 2 House 

Main Street 



Auburn 

Key West, Fla. 

South Brewer 

Brewer 

Bar Harbor 

Bath 

Marian, Mass. 

Greenville 

Houlton 

Lisbon Falls 

176 Court Street, Bangor 
Springfield, Mass. 

The Colonial, Bangor 
North Haven 401 H. H. Hall 

Bangor 

82 Montgomery Street, Bangor 
Old Town Old Town 

Pittsfield $ K 2 House 



16 



241 



Catalog of Students 



Hurley, Harold William, Law 

Hutchinson, Daniel Clair, Ag. 
Ingraham, Edith Louise, Gm. 
Jacobs, Maurice, Bl. 
Jenkins, Howard Lawrence, An 
Johnson, Carl Strong, Ph. 
Johnson, William Alonzo, Law 
Jones, Frederic Paul, Ee. 
Jones, Walter Converse, Es. 
Keating, Frederick Augustine, Law 

Kelleher, Michael Clarence, jr.. 

Law 
Kilburn, George Washington, Ms. 
Kloss, Theodore Edward, Ch. Eng. 
Lane, Hazel Irene, He. 
Lavorgna, Albert, Ce. 
Libby, Harry Cummings, Law 
Libby, Philip Nason, Fy. 
Littlefield, Waldemar Bunker, Me. 
Locke, John Fernando, Ch. 
Lougee, Frances Marie, Gm. 
McAlister, Royce Delano, Ed. 
McAvey, Liela Joyce, Eh. 
McCabe, Francis Thomas, Ee. 
McCabe, George Curtin, Ee. 
McCobb, Herbert Hodges, Ag. 
McCusker, Joseph Aloysius, Bl. 
McKown, Richard Edward, Es. 
Mank, Nelson Fountain, Me. 
Marble, Gerald Coker, Me. 
March, Ruth Evelyn, He. 
Martini, Mary Lillian, Bl. 
Mathews, Wilbur Leonard, Ee. 
Maxfield, Horatio Winfred, Me. 
Melincoff, John Henry, Gm. 
Mercier, Dorothy, Lt. 
Merrill, Katharine Buffum, Eh. 
Miles, Adalbert Laroy, Law 



W arc ham, Mass. 

59 Cedar Street, Bangor 
Dover Park Street 

Bangor 78 Grant Street, Bangor 
Methuen, Mass. 408 H. H. Hall 
Methucn, Mass. 2 A E House 

East ham p ton, Mass. B 9 n House 
Bangor 113 Broad Street, Bangor 
Biddcford 301 H. H. Hall 

Portland Campus 

Upper Gloucester 

84 Cedar Street, Bangor 
Westerly, R. I. 

10 Chester Place, Bangor 
Fort Fairfield 2 X House 

Kennebunkport <I> V A Hou^e 

Lewiston Balentine Hall 

Canton 202 Oak Hall 

Portland 84 Cedar Street, Bangor 
Gray 2 A E House 

Brewer $ K 2 House 

Mount Vernon 2 A E House 

Winter port North Hall 

Bucksport 2 A E House 

Bangor Mt. Vernon House 

Worcester, Mass. ATA House 
Kennebunkport X House 

Center Lincolnville A T O House 
Lewiston X House 

Southport 2 X House 

Portland Campus 

Skowhegan K 2 House 

Easton Balentine Hall 

Orono Bennoch Street 

Berwick A T Q House 

Portland $ K 2 House 

Bangor 56 Essex Street, Bangor 
Princeton North Hall 

Orono Main Street 

Ellsworth The Colonial, Bangor 



242 



Catalog of Students 



Moloney, Helen Carew, Eh. 
Morse. Ma viand Herbert, Law 
Mou'ton, Joseph Wendell, Ce. 
Moulton, Parker Nash, Bl. 
Mower, Clyde Fletcher, Me. 
Mower, I eland Monroe, Ce. 
Mullen, Charles Emerson, Ch. Eng. 
Murphy, Blanche Lauretta, Ped. 
Murray, Mable Thurston, Hy. 
Nash. William Edmund, Ce. 
Needham. Stanley Francis, Es. 
Newton, Maxwell, Ch. Eng. 
Nowell, Foster, Ce. 
O'Donoghue, William Florence, Fy. 
Page, Schuyler Colfax, Ee. 
Park, Irvin James, Ce. 
Partridge, Clara Estelle, He. 
Pemberton, Harold Sawyer, Ce. 
Pendleton, Raymond Ambrose, Ms. 
Penney, Charles Clifton, An. 
Perry. John Howard, Ch. 
Perry. Mi 1 dred Geneva, Rm. 
Peters, Shenton Ashley, Ee. 
Peterson, Henry Andrew, Bl. 
Phelps, Elizabeth Cornelia, Gm. 
Phillips, Edward Albert, Eh. 
Phillips, Stanley Gilkey, Ce. 
Pierce, Ralph Bartlett, Ch. 
Pitman, Lnwood True, Eh. 
Poore, Alice Mildred, Lt. 
Post. Lawrence Leicester, Ce. 
Preble, Leslie Edward, Ch. Eng. 
Reed, Harold Langdon, Ch. 
Reed, Stanley Lewis, Me. 
Remick, Edward Carleton, Ps. 
Reynolds, William Eugene, Dh. 
Rice, Charles Anthony, Es. 
Ricker, Ruth Merrill, He. 
Ridley, James Stevens, Ch. Eng. 
Robie, Mary Frederica, He. 



Orono 32 North Main Street 

Anson 253 Union Street, Bangor 

Rutland, Mass. 104 Oak Hall 

Bath 2 A E House 

Dexter Park Street 

Auburn 202 Oak Hall 

Bangor <J> r A House 

Portland Balentine Hall 

Boothbay Harbor Balentine Hall 

Concord, N. H. K 2 House 

Old Town Old Town 

Kent's Hill 306 H. H. Hall 

Reading, Mass. ATA House 

Lowell, Mass. A X A House 

Caribou <i> H K House 

Orono Pine Street 

Pemaquid Beach Balentine Hall 

Grov eland, Mass. A X A House 

Brewer 3> K 2 House 

Lewiston B X House 

Lincoln $TA House 

Orono R. F. D. 7, Bangor 
Bangor 12 Carroll Street, Bangor 

Portland no H. H. Hall 

Foxboro, Mass. Balentine Hall 

S^insarove, Pa. 46 Main Street 

Westbrook <£> r A House 

Beverly, Mass. 2 X House 

Auousta X House 

Robbinston Mt. Vernon House 

Alfred 112 H. H. Hall 

Saco Campus 

Lewiston 6 X House 

Methuen, Mass. Mill Street 

Springvale K 2 House 

Northeast Harbor ATA House 

Uxbridge, Mass. K 2 House 

Lisbon North Hall 

Brunswick X House 
Gorham Mt. Vernon House 



243 



Catalog of Students 



Robinson, Carl Elmo, Dh. 
Robinson, George Campbell, Me. 
Rowley, Levi Thaddeus, Me. 
Rudman, Abraham Moses, Law 
Russell, Edward Sebastian, Ag. 
Savage, Doris, Gm. 
Sawyer, Ralph Erie, Ee. 
Scribner, John Leslie, Ag. 
Sherman, Fuller Gustavus, Ch. 
Simpson, William Andrew, Ht. 
Smith, Clarence Llewellyn, Me. 
Smith, Marshall Odell, Ch. Eng. 
Stackpole, Miner Reginald, Ce. 
Stahl, Jerome Guttman, Es. 
Stephens, Frank Owen, Eh. 
Stephenson, Charles Lindsley, Ag. 
Stevens, Ray Randolph, An. 
Steward, Raymond Benson, Dh. 
Stoddard, Stanley Waldron, Ee. 
Stoehr, Rudolph, Dh. 
Stoughton, Richard, Ht. 
Sturtevant, Jessie May, Eh. 
Swanton, Carl Bartlett, Ce. 
Sweet, George Francis, Ce. 
Tabachnick, George Enoch, Ee. 
Thomas, Roy Frank, An. 
Travers, Robert James, Ee. 
Wadlin, George Knowlton, Ee. 
Wahlenberg, William Gustavus, Fy. 

Wardwell, Simon Murray, Ch. 
Waterhouse, Russell Vale, An. 
Watkins, Herbert Everett, Ch. 
Waugh, Harvey Cyrus, Me. 
Webster, William Clifford, Law 
Welch, Donald Stuart, Bl. 
Wentzel, Roy Alva, Ce. 
White, Horace Hudson, Law 
Wilbur, Elwood Morton, Ce. 
Wilson, Rolla Tenney, Ee. 



Bangor 408 H. H. Hall 

Westbrook ATA House 

Hartford, Conn. A T U House 

Bangor 26 Market Street, Bangor 
Vinalhaven 2 X House 

Bangor 35 Maple Street, Bangor 
Buxton Campus 

Plattsburgh, N. Y. $ H K House 
Randolph ATA House 

Marlboro, Mass. Grove Street. 

Vinalhaven 207 H. H. Hall 

Yarmouth X House 

Sanford 2 A E House 

Berlin, N. H. X House 

Auburn B B IT House 

King field 102 Main Street 

Ashland 3> H K House 

Portland 304 Oak Hall 

Bingham A T fi House 

Sabattus Park Street 

Montague, Mass. A X A House 
Milo Main Street 

Milbridge Park Street 

Williamstown, Mass. 3> r A House 
Portland 306 H. H. Hall 

Monson Spearen's Inn 

Bangor 68 Jefferson Street, Bangor 
East Northport A X A House 

Thompsonville, Conn. 

207 H. H. Hall 
Auburn B n House 

K ennebunk 2 A E House 

Woodfords ATA House 

Levant Campus 

Gorham 217 Broadway, Bangor 
Norway <l> H K House 

Livermore Falls 2 A E House 
Orono Myrtle Street 

Sorrento A X A House 

Bangor 27 Spruce Street, Bangor 



244 



Catalog of Students 



Wood, Frances Andrews, Rm. 
Wood, Lawrence Blanchard, An. 
Wood, Margaret Allen, Gm. 
Zabe, Ferris Joseph, Ee. 



Bar Harbor Main Street 

King field 410 H. H. Hall 

Bar Harbor Main Street 

Bangor 7 Newbury Street, Bangor 



SOPHOMORES 



Abbott, Voyle Eben, Ch. 
Aikins, Walter Bowen, Ag. 
Allen, William Henry, Es. 
Alley, Frank Oren, Ag. 
Andrews, Harold Taylor, Me. 
Annis, Howard LeRoy, Fy. 
Atherton, Raymon Neale, Ag. 
Bailey, George Raymond, Me. 
Ballantyne, Aubrey Elverton, Ch. 

Eng. 
Barker, Malcolm Everett, Ce. 
Barnard, Adriel Fales, Me. 
Barrett, Willett Clark, Gm. 
Benson, Clyde Allan, Ch. Eng. 
Beverage, Stanley Fremont, Ch. 
Bisbee, Frederick Carleton, Ee. 
Blackman, Marie Prince, He. 
Blackwood, Harold Frank, Ch. 

Eng. 
Blaisdell, Harvard Wilbur, Es. 
Blake, Philip Warren, Bl. 
Boothby, Wallace Johnson, Es. 
Brackett, Robert Emerson, Ps. 
Bransfield, William Henry, Ee. 
Brasier, Everett Hovey, Ch. Eng. 
Brittain, Thomas Waldo, Ch. 
Brown, Earl Robert, Bl. 

Brugge, Carl Fred, Me. 
Caldwell, Harold Benjamin, Ce. 
Calhoun, Lewis Tracy, Fy. 
Cameron, George Clifton, Me. 
Cannon, Gertrude Frances, Gm. 



Albion 

South Windham 
Brownville Junction 
Bar Harbor 



A T 9. House 

Campus 

Ben House 

2 X House 



Portland B n House 

Lincoln Center ATI] House 

Augusta 208 H. H. Hall 

Northampton, Mass. A T fi House 



Ware, Mass. 


Park Street 


Gardiner 


A T U House 


Buck sport 


Park Street 


Newport, R. I. 


$ T A House 


Le wist on 


X House 


North Haven 


2 A E House 


Berlin, N. H. 


Middle Street 


Peak Island Mt 


. Vernon House 


West Pembroke 


A X A House 


North Sullivan 


208 H. H. Hall 


Marlboro, Mass. 


Park Street 


Bangor 


312 H. H Hall 


Liming ton 


Mill Street 


Willimantic, Conn. 


Middle Street 


Guilford 


$ T A House 


Island Falls 


2 A E House 


Bangor 

446 Hammond 


t Street, Bangor 


Gorham 


K 2 House 


Madison 


College Street 


Bridgeport, Conn. 


K 2 House 


Fryeburg 


310 H. H. Hall 


Brewer 




64 Chamberlain 


Street, Brewer 



245 



Catalog of Students 



Carlson. Thurston Daniel, Ee. 
Carr, Russell Alton, Es. 
Carter. George Milton. Ee. 
Chadbourne, Preston Berlin. Ag. 
Chalmers. Ruth Bartlett. He. 
Chang, Hung Hsiang. Es. 
Chapman. Russell Comstock, Ce. 
Cheney, George Henry. Ch. 
Cobb. Herbert Gray. Ag, 
Cole, Raymond Fuller. Es. 
Connelly. William Tames. Ch. Eng. 
Coolbroth, Ernest Leon. Ce. 
Cram. Beryl Eliza. Lt. 
Cram. Ernest Victor, Ce. 
Crawshaw, Thomas Hill. Fy. 
Creamer. Walter Joseph. Jr.. Ee. 
Croekett. Mark Vernon, Ed. 
Crosby. Ruth. He. 
Cushing. Benjamin Hilton. Fy. 
Dah!gren, Sigfrid Alexander. Ag. 
Davis. Manley Webster. Ch. Eng. 
Davis. Melvin Linwood. Ee. 
DeBeek, Edith Eirena. Rm. 
dc Garis. Irving, Fy. 
Dennett. Winburn Albert. Ee. 
Derby. Pauline. Gm. 
Doe, Harold Oliver. Arts 
Dollott. Philip Warren. Ag. 
Dow. Kathryn May. He. 
Drisko, Clarence Holmes. Me. 
Dugan, Frances Joan. Gm. 
Dunham. Stephen Merle. Me. 
Dunn. Perley Bernard, Ag. 

g( rly. Lloyd Irving. Ch. Eng. 
Ellsworth, Harry Arthur. Ag. 
Emerson, Raymond LaForest, Fy. 
Emmons, Everett Ellsworth, Ee. 
Evans, Weston Sumner, Ce. 
Farrar, Helen Wilcox, Eh, 
Ferguson, Frank Currier, Eh. 



Hopedale, Mass. - A K House 

Sangerville - A E House 

Washburn 411 *H. H. Hall 

Harmony 108 Oak Hall 

Bangor Mt. Vernon House 

Shanghai, China 210 Oak Hall 

Hartford, Conn. <I> K - House 

Randolph $ V A House 

Wood fords $ K 2 House 

Brewer ATA House 

Pembroke Mayo Street 

Portland $ T A House 

New Sharon Balentine Hall 

San ford <£ T A House 

Lewiston 202 H. H. Hall 

Bangor 24 George Street, Bangor 
G or ham X House 

Bangor 223 State Street, Bangor 
Long Island Z X House 

Camden A T 9. House 

Guilford 4> T A House 

Sabattus 311 H. H. Hall 

Franklin Balentine Hall 

Millbrook. X. V. K Z House 

Hopedale, Mass. Z A E House 

Bangor 366 French Street, Bangor 
Bangor 100 Highland Street, Bangor 
Standish 312 H. H. Hall 

Soarsport Mt. Vernon House 

Columbia Falls Park Street 

Bangor 54 Sidney Street, Bangor 
Auburn X House 

Buckfield 2: A E House 

Swampscott, Mass. 111 H. H. Hall 
Farmington 211 H. H. Hall 

Island Falls Grove Street 

Portland 112 Oak Hall 

South Windham 303 H. H. Hall 
East Corinth North Hall 

New York, X. V. K 2 House 



246 



Catalog of Students 



Fernald, Abraham Chadwick, Jr., 

Es. 
Flint, Fannie Persis, He. 
Folsom, Dorothy Louise, Cm. 
Foss, Charles Leo, Me. 
Frawley, Marie Alice, Rm. 
French, Gardner Marble, Ce. 
Frost, Ermont Getchell, Es. 
Fung, Pu Sungyii, Es. 
Gammell, Lewis Waldo, Ch. Eng. 
Gardner, Leigh Philbrook, Ag. 
Gellerson, Vera Elvira, He. 
Gibbs, Frederick Donald, Ee. 
Gibbs, Grace Mabel, Bl. 
Goldberg, Abraham Fred, Es. 
Gray, James Harford, Ag. 
Greeley, Julian Francis, Rm. 
Gross, Maurice Glinton, Ed. 
Guinan, William Francis, Ce. 
Hagerty, Jean Mason. Es. 
Hahn, Edward Everett, Jr., Me. 
Haines, Frederick Bates, Ce. 
Hall, Sumner Augustus, Ag. 
Ham, Wallace Reed, Ee. 
Harper, William Chesley, Ee. 
Hathaway, Lester Walton, Ce. 
Hawthorne, Robert Henry, Ce. 
Head, Francis, Ce. 
Herlihy, Edward Leo, Bl. 
Hill, Roger Benson, Ch. Eng. 
Holden, Frank Benn, Me. 
Hooper, Henry Stinson, Ch. 
Hurd, Robert Gerry, Ch. Eng. 
Huskins, Eloise Blanche, Fr. 
Hutchins, George Stanley, Me. 
Hutton, Robert Granville, Ag. 
Hysom, Roscoe Hartwell, Ee. 
Jardine, Wilton Scott, Es. 

Jones, Harold Norton, Ee. 



Mt. Desert ATA House 

West Baldwin Balentine Hall 

Norridgewock Balentine Hall 

Woodfords 9 X House 

Bangor Balentine Hall 

Mansfield, Mass. 310 H. H. Hall 

Springvale K 2 House 

Ningpo, China 210 Oak Hall 

Attteboro, Mass. 310 H. H. Hall 

Denny sville 401 H. H. Hall 

Houlton North Hall 

South Portland Park Street 

East Orland Balentine Hall 
Bangor 93 Elm Street, Bangor 

Lubec B 9 II House 

Portland B 9 n House 

Deer Isle 2 A E House 
Northampton, Mass. A T O House 

Bangor 203 H. H. Hall 

Boothbay Harbor <I> H K House 

Portland B 9 n House 

Portland ATA House 

Bath 104 H. H. Hall 

Gardiner Spearen's Inn 

Bryan fs Pond Orono 

Brownville Main Street 

Bangor B 9 II House 
Bangor 174 York Street, Bangor 

Peabody, Mass. Campus 

Oakfield <P K 2 House 

Orono Pine Street 

Bangor <£ H K House 

Auburn North Hall 

Cape Neddick 2 X House 

Bowdoinham 9 X House 

Cambridge, Mass. K 2 House 
Arlington Heights, Mass. 

K 2 House 

Peabody, Mass. 302 H. H. HaK 



247 



Catalog of Students 



Jordan, Arlo Clifton, Es. 
Jortberg, Charles Augustus, Ch. 

Eng. 
Joy. Armand Elwood, Ed. 
Katz. Simon, Ch. 
Kaulfuss, Arthur Frederick, Gm. 
Kellogg. Thelma Louise, Eh. 
Kennett, Russell Blaisdell, Me. 
Kinney, Guy Leander, Ce. 
Larrabee, Callie Hamm, Bl. 
Lawrence. Lavina Fila, He. 
Leighton, Ralph Alelvin, Ch. 
Lewis, Roscoe Samuel, Hy. 
Libby, Donald Maxwell, Ee. 
Libby, Frank Dexter, Ch. Eng. 
Libby, Lewie Everett, Es. 
Libby, Lucien Taylor, Ch. 
Littlefield, Robert Moses, Ce. 
Longley, George Stephen, Ch. Eng. 
Lord, Columbus Ellis, Ee. 
Lovejoy, Raymond Harwood, Ag. 
Lown, Philip William, Ch. Eng. 
McCarthy, Raymond John, Es. 
McGrath, Joseph William, Ch. 
Mcllroy, Cecil Dow, Gm. 
AIcNamara, Raymond Leo, Me. 
McPhee, Hugh Curtis, Ag. 
McWilliams, Mona Beatrice, Gm. 
Aiagee, John Henry, Eh. 
Marsh, Raeburne Lyndon, Ag. 
Mason, Alice Eliza, Lt. 
Mathieson, Beatrice Louise, He. 
May. Marie Etta. Ag. 
Merrill, Charles Neal, Ch. Eng. 
Merrill, Marguerite Frances, He. 
Mcrriman, Lawrence Tilton, Ag. 
Merritt, Raymond Lowell, Ag. 
reau, Vera Lurline, He. 
Mincher, George Earle, Ch. Eng. 
5 isie 1 hw. He. 



Portland 



Park Street 



Portland A T £> House 

West Sullivan 2 A E House 

Portsmouth, N. H. 201 H. H. Hall 
La Crosse, Ills. Main Street 

Vanceboro Balentine Hall 

Madison, X. H. 16 Bennoch Street 
Blaine 204 H. H. Hall 

Frankfort 40 Alain Street 

North Lubcc Alt. Vernon House 
Bar Harbor College Street 

Auburn 302 H. H. Hall 

Orono Park Streei 

Gardiner ATA House 

Westbrook Z X House 

Scarboro 103 H. H. Hall 

gun quit 304 H. H. Hill 

Lewiston B 9 n Houb. 

Foxcroft Campus 

New Sharon 40 North Alain Street 
Bangor 204 H. H. Hall 

Springfield, Mass. Bennoch Street 
Northampton, Mass. 101 H. H. Hall 
Milo 9 X Hous-i 

Orono Mill Street 

South Paris 209 H. H. Hall 

Bangor Mt. Vernon House 

Bangor K Z House 

Corinna 305 Oak Hall 

Mount Desert College Street 

Bangor Alt. Vernon House 

Island Falls College Street 

Bangor ^ V A House 

Mechanic Falls Balentine Hall 

Harp swell Center 204 Oak Hall 
Brooks "4> H K House 

West Somerz'ille, Mass. North Hall 
Bangor $ V A House 

A\ w Sharon Balentine Hall 



248 



Catalog of Students 



Mooney, Richard Henry, Jr., Hy. 
Moore, Madeline, Gin. 
Moore, Robert Colby, Pm. 
Morris, Paul Austin, Ed. 
Morse, James Lester, Ag. 
Moul, Arthur Franklin, Fy. 
M< Hilton, Simon Waldo, Es. 
Mullen, Joseph Norman, Ee. 
Murphy, William Robert, Ag. 
Nealey, Everett Thornton, Jr., Bl. 
Newell, George Clifford, Ce. 
Norton, Donald William, Ch. Eng. 
O'Brion, Arthur Bartholomew, Pm. 
O'Connell, John Michael, Jr., Eh. 
Prrmenter, Robert Brown, Fy. 
Penley. Ferdinand Josiah, Ag. 
Perkins, Carl Wakefield, Ch. Eng. 
Perkins, Carleton Lincoln, Fy. 
Perkins, Myles Standish, Me. 
Perry, Donald Burke, Ee. 
Philbrook, Everett Carlton, Ee. 
Phillips, Ray Eugene, Ed. 
Pinkham, Jessie Marie, He. 
Pomeroy, John Mann, Ee. 
Ramsay, John Parker, Es. 
Ramsdell, Hollis Leroy, Ag. 
Reardon, Jeremiah Timothy, Es. 
Redin, Leeland John, Ch. Eng. 
Reed, Carrol Coffin, Ag. 
Reed, Gladys Gage, Gm. 
Rich, Robert, Ee. 
Richardson, Burt, Jr., Es. 
Richardson, George Lovell, Ag. 
Ring, Edgar Raymond, Es. 
Riva, Robert Arthur, Ee. 
Rose, Hester Miles, Eh. 
Ross, Charlotte Feme, He. 
Rourke, John Edward, Eh. 
Rowe, Harland Stimson, Es. 
Ruggles, Gould Bishop, Ee. 



Worcester, Mass. '105 Oak Hall 

Orono Pine Street 

Bingham A T Q House 

Old Town Old Town 

Bath 104 H. H. Hall 

Hanover, Pa. <i> K 2 House 

Scbago Lake 312 H. H. Hall 

Bangor <l> r A House 

Old Town Old Town 

Bangor 402 H. H. Hall 

Turner 303 H. H. Hall 

Kingfield 410 H. H. Hall 

Portland in H. H. Hali 

Bangor O X House 

Marlboro, Mass. 2 X House 

Lewiston 2 A E House 

Ogunquit 210 H. H. Hall 
Newbury port, Mass. Main Street 

Worcester, Mass. 406 H. H. Hall 

Hallowell $ H K House 

Gardiner A T Q House 

Newport Campus 

Farming ton Balentine Hall 

Calais Campus 

Woodfords <£ K 2 House 

West Lubec Orono 

Concord, N. H. K 2 House 

Portland no H. H. Hall 

Mollis, N. H. College Street 
Bangor 38 Elm Street, Bangor 

Berlin, N. H. 30S Oak Hall 

Glendale, Cal. B 9 IT House 

Neeaham, Mass. 2 X House 

Orono Summer Street 

Berlin, N. H. 305 H. H. Hall 
Brooks Mt. Vernon House 

Dexter Balentine Hall 

Beverly, Mass. 2 Bennoch Street 

Springvale B IT House 

Reading, Mass. A X A House 



249 



Catalog of Students 



Russell, Alfred Mason, Me. 
Russell, Doris Ethel, Bl. 
Shaw, Albert Leland, Ch. Eng. 
Shaw, Reba Cleaves, He. 
Shea, Thomas Francis, Ce. 

Simms, Henry Swain, Ch. 
Sisson, Willard Case, Ag. 
Small, Clive Ceylon, Ch. Eng. 
Spaulding, Herbert Ansel, Ag. 
Speirs, James Everett, Ch. 
Spratt, Aubury Johnson, Ee. 
Springer, Clarence Barrows, Ee. 
Stinchfield, Helen Louise, Lt. 
Storer, Clayton Alton, Ag. 
Stott, Gerald Ross, Ch. Eng. 
Stuart, Helen Loggie, Gm. 
Sturtevant, Walter Conrad, Ag. 
Sullivan, George Wilmer, Ch. Eng. 
Swift, Harold Clayton, Ag. 
Thaanum, Joanna Mary, He. 
Theriault, Dolore Frank, Me. 
Thompson, Seward Roy, Bl. 
Totman, Otto Leslie, Bl. 
Townsend, Harvard Clark, Ag. 
Turner, Dwight Wilson, Ag. 
Turner, Ernest Julian, Ch. Eng. 
Turner, O'Dillion Charles, Eh. 
Vaughan, Natalie Alice, Ms. 
Vaughan, Sewall Dunbar, Ag. 
Vrooman, Lee, Ag. 
Watson, Harry Dexter, Me. 
Webster, Fred Lot, Ag. 
Webster, Stephen Tracy, Ch. Eng. 
Wells. Richard Rundlette, Es. 
Wentworth, Ralph Carlton, Ag. 
Wescott, Merle William, Ce. 
Whitcomb, Morton Church, Ch. 

Eng. 
White, ffarry Lincoln, Rm. 



Rangeley College Street 

Orono 80 Main Street 

Lewiston <I> r A House 

Orono Park Street 
Bangor 

154 Park View Ave., Bangor 

Gorham <£ r A House 
Hartford, Conn. 410 H. H. Hall 

Farmington <£ K 2 House 

Buckfield 209 Oak Hall 

Woodfords ATA House 

Bar Harbor 2 X House 

Portland 304 H. H. Hall 

Danforth North Hall 

Weld Campus 

Sangerville 303 H. H. Hall 
Bangor 14 Davis Street, Bangor 

Mxlo Main Street 
Veazie R. F. D. 7, Bangor 

Auburn 309 H. H. Hall 

Winthrop Balentine Hall 

Millinocket 203 H. H. Hall 

Standish 103 Oak Hall 

Fairfield B 9 n House 

Newport Campus 

Buckfield 209 Oak Hall 
Brewer 74 State Street, Brewer 

Veasie R. F. D. 7, Bangor 

Orono • North Main Street 

Warren ATA House 

Greenville 304 Oak Hall 

West Baldwin 4> H K House 

Farmington 211 H. H. Hall 

Augusta Ben House 

South Bristol <I> H K House 

Denmark no H. H. Hall 

Rumford 2 A E House 



Ellsworth 
Belfast 



2 X House 
K 2 House 



250 



Catalog of Students 



Worcester, Frank Clark, Hy. 
Wunderlich, Albert Whittier, Es. 



Harrington 

Arlington, Mass. 



Mill Street 
2 X House 



FRESHMEN 



Adams, Chester Norris, Ee. 
Adams, Earl Russel, Ch. 
Adams, Edwin Wentworth, Ch. 
Adams, George Joseph, Arts 
Agger, Harold Joseph, Arts 
Altman, Frank Isadore, Ce. 
Alward, Harry Allen, Ce. 
Ames, Helen Frances, Arts 
Anderson, Carl Alfred, Fy. 

Andrews, Ralph Charles, Me. 
Arnold, Eugene Fairfield, Ch. Eng. 
Astle, Ray Milton, Eng. 
Averill, Robert Wallace, Ch. Eng. 
Avery, George Halburton, Ag. 
Bailey, Stanwood Lee, Arts 
Baldwin, Frederick Earl, Ee. 
Barbour, Forrest Atkinson, Ch. 

Eng. 
Barney, George Curtis, Ee. 
Bartlett, Philip Alvin, Ag. 
Bates, William Dorrill, Fy, 
Bean, Harold John, Ch. 
Beaulieu, Jennie Christina, Arts 
Beck, Joseph Thomas, Arts 
Berry, Max Dudley, Arts 
Beverly, Verne Curtis, Ag. 
Billings, Jesse Winfield, Arts 
Black, Ethel Corinne, Arts 
Blakney, Herbert Edson, Ee. 
Blanchard, Daniel Briggs, Ag. 
Blethen, Melvin Snow, Ee. 
Boomer, Vurle Lee, Ch. Eng. 
Borjesson, Thomas Whitmore, Ag. 
Boyd, Earl George, Arts 



Wilton 

Watcrville 

Auburn 

Orono 

Portland 

Lawrence, Mass. 

Bangor 

Vinalhavcn 

East Bridgewater, 



South Paris 

Foxcroft 

Houlton 

Stillwater 

North Lubec 

Portland 

Peabody, Mass. 

Wood fords 

Berlin, N. IT. 

Island Pond, Vt. 

North Islesboro 

Rutland, Mass. 

Old Town 

Augusta 

Danvers, Mass. 

Bangor 

Portland 

Vinalhaven 

Fairfield 

Auburn 

Foxcroft 

Lubec 

Richmond 

Kingman 



14 



14 



16 



* H K House 

$ r A House 

201 H. H. Hall 

35 Mill Street 

Mayo Street 

no H. H. Hall 

312 H. H. Hall 

North Hall 

Mass. 

Pine Street 

309 Oak Hall 

Bennoch Street 

Main Street 

Stillwater 

101 Oak Hall 

Ben House 

106 Oak Hall 

2 A E House 

Pleasant Street 

Mill Street 

Park Street 

104 Oak Hall 

Old Town 

ATA House 

304 H. H. Hall 

K 2 House 

Mill Street 

North Hall 

9 X House 

311 H. H. Hall 

Bennoch Street 

Park Street 

Bennoch Street 

ATA House 



251 



Catalog of Students 



Bradley, Earl Albert, Ee. 
Bragdon, Stacy Lloyd, Ch. 
Brown, Fred Hopkins, Eng. 
Brown, Ralph Lawrence, Arts 
Bryant, Clarence Philip, Ee. 
Bunnell, Shirley Abel, Ee. 
Burnham, Philip Merle, Me. 
Cahill, Alice Lena, Arts 
Caine, Mae Frances, Arts 
Campbell, Henry Whiting, Ce. 
Campbell, Vergil Isaiah, Ce. 
Canning, Harold Francis, Law 
Carlton, George Melvin, Ee. 
Carroll, Charles Michal, Law 

Colby College 
Cassidy, Donald William, Ee. 
Caswell, Curtis Lowe, Ch. Eng. 
Champion, Charles Henry, Ch. Eng. 
Chapman, Clyde Raymond. Law 

A. B., Bowdoin College, 1912 
Chellis, Robert Dunning, Ee. 
Cheney, Joyce Marguerite, Arts 

Churchill, Warren Stanley, Ch. 
Chute, James Lemuel, Ee. 
Clark, Charles Bartlett, Eng. 
Clarke, Ruth Gertrude, Arts 
Cleveland, Orestes, Ag. 
Coady, Donald Lewis, Ag. 
Cobb, Bertrand Everett, Ee. 
Cobb, William Bangs, Ag. 
Cohen, Robert, Law 
Colbath, Kenneth Brenton, Arts 
Collins, Paul Torrey, Ch. Eng. 
Collins, Samuel Wilson, Me. 
Conk, Raymond John, Arts 
Cooley, Leland Rodney, Me. 
Cooper, Laurence Arthur, Me. 
Tore}-, Charles Truman, Arts 
(on) forth, Robert Gardner, Me. 



Foxcroft 2 A E House 

Gorham 410 Oak Hall 

Bangor 62 Fifth Street, Bangor 
Bristol Park Street 

Lincoln <i> r A House 

Wales 406 Oak Hall 

Portland Grove Street 

North Anson North Hall 

Brewer 18 Main Street, Brewer 

Cherryfield 310 H. H. Hall 

Harmony 108 Oak Hall 

Bar Harbor The Page, Bangor 

Woolwich 303 H. H. Hail 

Waterville 

135 Union Street, Bangor 
Houlton Main Street 

Harrison Park Street 

Adams, Mass. ATA House 

Fairfield 211 Union Street, Bangor 

Portland 2 X House 
Bridgeport, Conn. 

Mt. Vernon House 

Waterville 102 Main Street 

Saco A T Q House 
North New Portland $ H K House 

Machias North Hall 

Albany, N. Y. Park Street 

Patten K 2 House 

Woodfords 208 Oak Hall 

Woodfords $ K 2 House 

Bangor 305 Essex Street, Bangor 

Easton K 2 House 

Hallowell 102 Oak Hall 

Caribou <i> K 2 House 

Worcester, Mass. 212 Oak Hall 

Solon 107 Oak Hall 

Auburn B X House 

Portland $ H K House 

Seymour, Conn. Mill Street 



252 



Catalog of Students 



Corning, Clarence Hamilton, Arts 
Cosgrove, William Augustine, Ch. 

Eng. 
Couette, Ralph Hubert, Law 

Wesleyan University 
Coughlan, William Joseph, Law 
Cowen, Robert, Ch. 
Craig, Ira Caswell, Ee. 
Crocker, Percival Bradford, Me. 
Cross, Hugo Silas, Arts 
Cross, Kendall, Me. 
Crowley, Frances, Arts 
Culhane, Gerald Joseph, Arts 
Curran, Anne Genevieve, He. 
Curran, James Joseph, Law 

A. B., St. Mary's, 1913 
Curtis, Arthur Burle, Me. 
Cushman, George Mason, Ce. 
Daley, Edward Desmond, Law 
Dalrymple, Philip Dascomb, Arts 
Darrah, John Clarke Flagg, Ch. 
Davis, Jasper Alden Worcester, Ce. 
Davis, Thomas, Ag. 
Day, Frank Conant, Ce. 
DeCoster, Harry Perry, Fy. 
Demerritt, Dwight Burgess, Ch. 
Denison, Clifford Dawes, Ag. 
Dennis, Bessie, Arts 
DeWolfe, James Codman, Law 
Dodd, Clarence John, Ee. 
Dole, Howard Noyes, Ee. 
DollofT, Ray Winfield, Ag. 
Donovan, Frank Edward, Arts 
Donovan, Irving Raymond, Arts 

Douglass, Lloyd Richmond, Ee. 
Dow, Arthur Greenleaf, Ee. 
Dow, Maynard Weston, Ag. 
Drew, Harold Ray, Law 



Bangor 393 State Street, Bangor 

Biddeford $ r A House 

Westfield, Mass. 

71 Third Street, Bangor 
Waterville 135 Union Street, Bangor 
Cambridge, Mass. A T O House 
Millinocket 203 H. H. Hall 

Foxboro, Mass. 2 X House 

Guilford $ r A House 

Solon 4> H K House 

Bangor 15 Forest Ave., Bangor 

Boston, Mass. Hamlin Street 

Great Works Great Works 

Portland 62 High Street, Bangor 

Solon 103 Oak Hall 

Portland 4> H K House 

Bangor 16 Sidney Street, Bangor 
Revere, Mass. 2 A E House 

Boston, Mass. Mayo Street 

Beverly, Mass. North Main Street 
Veazie R. F. D. 7, Bangor 

Lewiston Pond Street 

Lynn, Mass. ATA House 

Sangerville 410 Oak Hall 

Harrison Spearen's Inn 

Bangor 186 Essex Street, Bangor 
Portland The Colonial, Bangor 

Mexico Spearen's Inn 

Haverhill, Mass. X House 

Hillside 212 H. H. Hall 

Turner's Falls, Mass 6 X House 
Bangor 

134 Kenduskeag Ave., Bangor 
Augusta 185 Pine Street, Bangof 
South Paris 104 H. H. Hall 

Kent's Hill 2 A E House 

Kennebunkport 

59 Cedar Street, Bangor 



253 



Catalog of Students 



Drisko, Melvin Tabbutt, Arts 
Duncan, Cony Alexander, Ch. Eng. 
Duncan, Kenneth James, Ee. 
Dunn, Sherman William, Ch. Eng. 
Dunning, Robert Blaisde'l, Arts 
Durkee, Harold Allen, Fy. 
Eastman, Harland Horace, Ag. 
Eddy, Lawrence Bailey, Arts 
Ellsworth, William Clarence, Ee. 
Emerson, Ralph Waldo, Fy. 
Emery, Newell W}^man, Arts 
Epstein, Anna Pauline, Arts 
Farmer, Marguerite Eva, Arts 
Farnham, Alton Joshua, Arts 
Farnum, Philip Talbot, Ee. 
Farr, Kenneth Randall, Ch. Eng. 
Faulkingham, Bertram Nash, Ee. 
Ferrin, Earle Leslie, Arts 
Files, Charles Harper, Ch. 
Fitzgerald, John Cogan, Law 

Bowdoin College 
Forsyth, Allan Richard, Ag. 
Foss, Chailes Earle, Me. 
Fowler, Burtus Frederic, Me. 
Freeland, James Horatio, Ch. 
French, Marion Elizabeth. Arts 
French, Minot Elden, Me. 
French, Roger Maitland, Ag. 
Froberger, George Auguste Joseph, 

Ch. Eng. 
Frye, Frances Smith, Ag. 
Furey, John Glynn, Arts 
Gallant, Benjamin Ralph, Arts 
Gardner, Ruth Electa, He. 
Garland, Ernest Leonard, Ch. Eng. 
Gaudreau, Armand Theophane, Ee. 
Giberson, Claude Trafton, Me. 
Giles, Cornelius Francis, Me. 
Girard, Paul Abel, Ee. 

n, Francis James, Arts 



J onesboro 

Augusta 

W ashburn 

Hallowell 

Bangor 

Swamp scott, Mass. 

Springvale 



Park Street 

Park Street 

411 H. H. Hall 

Park Street 

$ T A House 

in H. H. Hall 

109 Oak Hall 



Bangor 242 Cedar Street, Bangor 



Farmington 
Island Falls 
Salisbury Cove 
Bangor 
Charleston 
Readfield 
East Wilton 
Oakland 
J one sport 
East Corinth 
Portland 
Bath 

Orrington 

Woodfords 

Monmouth 

Bangor 

Fort Fairfield 

Lincolnville 

Solon 



Augusta 

Camden 

Bangor 101 Secon< 

Bingham 

Westfield, Mass. 

Old Town 

Lewiston 

Grove ton, N. H. 

Peabody, Mass. 

Biddeford 

Orono 



211 H. H. Hall 

Grove Street 

Grove Street 

North Hall 

Balentine Hall 

Campus 

409 H. H. Hall 

A T Q Hou*e 

A X A House 

Main Street 

$ K 2 House 

316 Hammond Street 



Orrington 

6 X House 

406 Oak Hall 

B9II House 

Balentine Hall 

Park Street 

102 Oak Hall 

Park Street 

Park Street 

. Street, Bangor 

BGII House 

North Hall 

Old Town 

Park Street 

309 H. H. Hall 

Campus 

Grove Street 

Main Street 



254 



Catalog of Students 



Gooch, Marjorie Eunice, He. 
Goodwin, Charles Gile, Me. 
Goodwin, John Elmer, Eng. 
Googins, Richard Lucien, Me. 
Gorden, Walter Lincoln, Me. 
Gordon, Samuel Frederick, Ch. 
Gould, Clifford Perkins, Ee. 
Gould, Madeline Lydia, Arts 
Graves, Harold Keith, Me. 
Greene, John Corneilus, Ag. 
Griffin, Stephen Augustus, Ch. 
Hale, George Lester, Law 
Haley, Blanche Lillian, He. 
Hall, Ella May, He. 
Hall, Elliott Edgar, Fy. 
Handley, Hale Wright, Ag. 
Hanly, Marion Helena, He. 
Hansen, Milton Christopher, Me. 
Hanson, Ivan Stevens, Me. 

Hardy, Carl Edward, Ag. 
Harmon, Artemas Henry, Ag. 
Harmon, Perley Francis, Ch. 
Harootune, Hovhannesian, Law 

West Virginia University; 
Harper, Herbert Leon, Arts 
Harriman, Stanley, Ch. 
Harrington, Randall Alfred, Ee. 
Harris, Joseph Freeman, Ag. 
Harris, Leon Carleton, Ch. 
Harthorn, Marion Louise, Arts 
Haskell, Clara Louise, Arts 
Haskins, Edmund, Fy. 
Haskins, Elwina Lewis, He. 
Hatch, Joseph Philip, Ce. 
Haynes, Charles Albert, Fy. 
Henderson, Harry Elmont, Arts 
Hilliker, Errold Wallace, Ag. 
Hitchings, Herbert William, Me. 



Taunton, Mass. Balentine Hall 

Springvale 109 Oak Hall 

St, Albans College Street 

Biddcford Grove Street 

Livcrmore Falls 407 Oak Hall 

Lincoln 316 Main Street, Old Town 
Kennebunkport $ r A House 

Bangor Mt. Vernon House 

Presque Isle <£ H K House 

Salem, Mass. ATA House 

Peaks Island Park Street 

Belfast 32 Second Street, Bangor 
Bangor Balentine Hall 

Brewer Mt. Vernon House 

Vinalhaven 401 H. H. Hall 

Camden Park Street 

Warren Balentine Hall 

Vernon, Conn. Park Street 

Winter Harbor 

40 North Main Street 
Bangor 124 Parkview Ave., Bangor 
Portland 2 X House 

Caribou 403 Oak Hall 

Boston, Mass. 

55 Fourth Street, Bangor 
Euphrates College 
Calais 102 Main Street 

Gardiner 310 Oak Hall 

South Bristol $ H K House 

Patten K 2 House 

Portland in Oak Hall 

Milford Balentine Hall 

Steuben 403 Balentine Hall 

Woodfords 88 Main Stree^ 

Woodfords 403 Balentine Hall 

Damariscotta A X A House 

Ellsworth 2 X House 

Hartland 209 H. H. Hall 

Corinna Stillwater 

Caribou 403 H. H. Hall 



255 



Catalog of Students 



Hitchings, Kathryn Estella, He. 
Hoagland, Webster Comley, Ch. 
Hobbs, Vernon Francis, Ce. 
Hodgdon, Paul Edward, Ch. Eng. 
Hodgkins, Earle Asmond, Arts 
Holden, Clyde Thaddeus, Ee. 
Holston, Clyde William, Ee. 
Holt, Stanley Norris, Ce. 
Hopkins, Adele Cecilia, He. 
Hopkins, Ray Clifford, Ee. 
Howard, Joel Hayden, Ag. 
Hudson, Myron Terry, Ag. 
Hughey, John Millard, Ch. Eng. 
Hurd, Donald Washburn, Me. 
Hussey, Leroy Fogg, Arts 
Hussey, Wayne Blethen, Ag. 
Jackson, Frederic Marston, Ch. Eng. 
Jameson, Foster Davis, Ag. 
Johonnett, Helen Rowe, Arts 

Johnson, Loren Baker, Es. 
Jones, Phillip Alonzo, Law 

Jones, Samuel Everett, Ee. 
Jordan, John Frederick, Law 
Jordan, Ruth, Arts 
Jordan, Theodore Raymond, Ag. 
Katz, Hyman, Law 

Southern College of Medicine 
Keep, John Marcus, Me. 
Kelley, Edward Henry, Eng. 
Kelley, Henry Woodhull, Arts 
Kendall, Ralph Miles, Ee. 
Kennison, Edward Earle, Fy. 
Kenniston, Luther Edward, Ce. 
Kimball, Guy Harold, Arts 
King, Earl Christopher, Arts 
King, Harold Louis, Ch. 
King, Rufus Brooks, Ee. 
Kirk, Edward Benedict, Arts 



Caribou Balentine Hall 

Stow, Mass. A X A House 

Matiawamkeag 404 H. H. Hall 

Cliftondale, Mass. Park Street 

Jefferson A X A House 

Sabattus 302 Oak Hal! 

IVestbrook 201 H. H. Hall 

Dorchester, Mass. Park Street 

Old Town Old Town 

Camden Peters Street 

Lewiston ATA House 

Winthrop Myrtle Street 

Long Island 3 Peters Street 

IVestbrook Grove Street 

Augusta Park Street 

Patten $K2 House 

Newbury port, Mass. 307 Oak Hall 
Friendship 401 Oak Hall 

Hampden Highlands 

Hampden Highlands 
Fitchburg, Mass. 2 X House 

Bangor 

35 Parkview Avenue, Bangor 
Augusta 201 H. H. Hall 

Bangor 143 Grove Street, Bangor 
Old Town Mt. Vernon House 

Cumberland Center A X A House 
Bangor 183 York Street, Bangor 
and Surgery 

Conway, N. H. AX A House 

Bangor 52 Essex Street, Bangor 
Bangor 16 Bennoch Street 

Biddeford S A E House 

North New Portland <f> H K House 
Amherst 49 Charles Street, Bangor 
Waterboro 212 H. H. Hall 

Orono 23 Broadway 

Orono Pleasant Street 

Peabody, Mass. Park Street 

Bar Harbor Pine Street 



256 



Catalog of Students 



Kittredge, William Carl, Ch. Eng. 
Knowlton, Norman Perley, Me. 
Landers, Carleton Ames, Ag. 
Larrabee, Clifford Prentiss, Ch. 

Eng. 
Lasselle, Harry Stearns, Ch. Eng. 
Lawler, Mark Robinson, Eng. 
Lawrence, Arthur Neale, Ee. 
Lawrence, Frank Albert, Law 

Lawry, Emerson Chase, Ch. 
Leighton, Chester Frank, Ee. 
Levenson, George, Law 

Levin, Reuben, Law 

Cornell College 
Lewis, Carl Arthur Randall, Ag. 
Libby, Bernard Augustus, Ee. 
Ligom, Morris, Arts 
Linton, William Harn, Ee. 
Loon, Alfred Joseph, Ee. 
Lord, Frank Wadleigh, Ag. 
Loring, Fred Milton, Law 

A. B., Bates College, 1910 
Lowell, Arthur Wilbur, Ch. Eng. 
Lucas, John Wilbur, Arts 
Luce, Ralph Trueman, Me. 
Ludden, Hobart Hayes, Arts 
Lurvey, Preston Eugene, Ch. 
McAlister, Lawrence, Arts 
MacBride, Winthrop Lawrence, Fy. 
MacCharles, Howard Kenneth, Me. 
Macdonald, Maxwell Eugene, Arts 
MacDonnell, Reginald Hugh, Ch. 
MacFarlane, Frederick Ray, Ee. 
McGrath, James Bernard, Ch. Eng. 
McGrath, William Joseph, Law 
McLean, Edward Archibald, Ce. 
Macquarrie, Kenneth Godfrey, Jr., 
Ch. 



Portland 304 H. H. Hall 


Freedom 


Grove Street 


Easton 


Main Street 


Old Town 


Old Town 


Norway 


<S> H K House 


Southwest Harbor 


404 Oak Hall 


North Lubec 


ATA House 


North Lubec 




24 Sanford Street, Bangor 


Fairfield 


B n House 


Strong 168 Grove Street 


Dorchester, Mass. 




Y. M 


'.. C. A., Bangor 


Manchester, Vt. 




63 Elm 


Street, Bangor 


Augusta 


Park Street 


Limerick 


Mill Street 


Fitchburg, Mass. 


310 Oak Hall 


Lincoln 78 Elm 


Street, Bangor 


Monmouth 


Campus 


Kezar Falls 


Park Street 


Auburn 24 Sanford 


Street, Bangor 


Portland 


K 2 House 


Portland 


X House 


Farmington 211 H. H. Hall 


Waltham, Mass. 


K 2 House 


Island Falls 


Grove Street 


Rockland 


Main Street 


Chelsea, Mass. 


207 Oak Hall 


Peabody, Mass. 


106 Oak Hall 



257 State Street, Bangor 
Ayer, Mass. 88 Main Street 

South Gardiner A T fi House 

Northampton, Mass. 311 Oak Hall 
Rumford 76 Court Street, Bangor 
Augusta 406 H. H. Hall 



Portland 



ATA House 



257 



17 



Catalog of Students 



Mahoney, John Clinton, Ch. Eng. 
Marcon, Napoleon Alphonse, Law 

Marsh, Bernard Church, Fy. 
Martin, Andrew Lawrence, Arts 
Martin, Willis Gilman, Arts 
May, Edwin Hyland, Ee. 
Mayers, Warren Thompson, Arts 
Mayo, Donald Atwood, Ee. 
Melcher, Edmund Capron, Ag. 
Merrow, Lawrence Earle, Ee. 
Millett, Richard Melvin, Ag. 
Mitchell, Arthur Raymond, Ag. 
Mitchell, Myron Atwood, Ee. 
Mooney, Lawrence Henry, Arts 
Moore, Millard George, Ch. Eng. 
Mosher, James Earle, Arts 
Moulton, George Albert, Ce. 
Murphy, Frank William, Eng. 
Newell, George Esty, Ag. 
Newman, Isaiah Leavitt, Me. 
Niles, Charles Fernald, Ce. 
Niles, Walter Leslie, Arts 
Norcross, Evans Barkley, Ch. Eng. 
Northrup, Christine Adelia, Arts 
Norton, George Fred, Ag. 
Noyes, Kenneth Bradford, Me. 
Ohnemus, Clifford Andrews, Eng. 
Osborne, Loomis Richard Fred- 
erick, Arts 
Osgood, Arthur Bradley, Ee. 
Owen, Robert Roak, Ee. 
Parker, Erie St. John, Arts 
Parsons, Earle Odber, Ee. 
Pattee, Karl Monroe, Ee. 
Peckham, Earle Stuart, Ag. 
Perry, Benjamin Cowl, Jr., Me. 
Perry, Clark, Eng. 
Perry, Orin Francis, Jr., Fy. 
Pierce, Harold Merle, Ch. Eng. 



Biddeford Grove Street 
Watcrville 

21 Sanford Street, Bangor 

Dexter A X A House 

Woodfords ( I J V A House 

Hopcdalc, Mass. 207 Oak Hall 

Hartford, Conn. <i> K 2 House 

Bath 307 Oak Hall 
Hampden Highlands K 2 House 

Cumberland Mills 1 X House 

Saco A T o House 

South Paris 209 H. H. Hall 

Sabattus Park Street 

South Berwick B X House 

Berlin, X. H. Pine Street 

Old Town Old Town 

Belgrade 102 H. H. Hall 

East Brozvnfield 204 H. H. Hall 

Machias Bennoch Street 

Hoitlton $ K 2 House 

East Wilton 409 H. H. Hall 

Rumford 409 Oak Hall 

Hallowell ATA House 

Portland <E> T A House 
Palermo 28 Bennoch Street 

Caribou Park Street 

Orono Forest Avenue 

Waltham, Mass. Spearen's Inn 



Fort Fairfield 

Bradford 

Auburn 

Danforth 

Patten 

Sou til Liming foil 

Bangor 14 Maple 

Rockland 

Machias 

New York, N. Y. 

Norridgcwock 



11 Pond Street 

Stillwater 

205 Oak Hall 

<£ r A House 

Park Street 

Mill Street 

Street, Bangor 

<i> r A House 

11 Pond Street 

<J> r A House 

<£ H K House 



258 



Catalog of Students 



Pik r illian Abby, He. 
Piper, Dorothy Eva, Arts 
Pitts, Samuel Lee, Fy. 
Plummer, Harold Otis, Law 
Plummer, Norman Dyer, Ce. 
Polakewich, Abraham, Ee. 
Poor, Charles Montgomery, Fy. 
Pratt, Fannie Louise, He. 
Preti, Frank Peter, Law 
Prince, Rufus, Eng. 
Pulsifer, James Hayes, Ag. 
Quimby, Robert Sinclair, Law 

Ranger, Ralph Augustine, Me. 

Rapp, Herbert, Arts 

Richards, Clifton Sweetser, Ch. 

Eng. 
Richards, Henry Lane, Fy. 
Rideout, Elmer William, Ch. 

Ring, Arthur Andrews, Me. 
Robbins, Hamlyn Nelson, Ag. 
Robbins, Victor Hugo, Eng. 
Rodick, Serenus Burleigh, Ag. 
Rowe, Allen Bedford, Ag. 
Rumill, George Edwin, Ce. 
Russell, George Frederick, Ag. 
Russell, Orlando Parker, Arts 
Pyan, Stephen Joseph, Me. 
Sawyer, Charles Augustine, Me. 
Schenck, Frederic Van Nydick, Ee. 
Scott, Edith May, Arts 
Scott, Ethel Lue, Arts 
Sears, Albert Johnson, Ce. 
Segal, Abraham, Arts 
Shaw, Burton Alfred, Ag. 
Sherman, Elmo Linwood, Arts 
Shorey, Clyde Norman, Ag. 
Simpson, Gilroy Sousa, Ag. 
Sinnett, Ralph Vernon, Ch. Eng. 



Fryeburg North Hall 

Fairfield Balentine Ha 1 l 

Harrison Park Street 

Harrington 71 Third Street, Bangor 
Dorchester, Mass. 301 H. H. Hall 
Biddeford 309 H. H. Hall 

Andover Spencer Street 

North New Portland Balentine Hall 
Portland 3> H K House 

Turner Spearen's Inn 

Auburn 411 H. H. Hall 

West Campion, N. H. 

320 Hammond Street, Bangor 
Dryden Grove Street 

Turners Falls, Mass. A X A House 



Bucksport 

Portland 

Bucksport 

116 Jackson 
Orono 

Arlington, Mass 
Old Town 
Bar Harbor 
Portland 
Mount Desert 
Methuen, Mass. 
Hanover 
Ayer, Mass. 
Portland 
Millinocket 
Wolfeboro, N. H. 
Wolfeboro, N. H. 
W oodfords 
Lewiston 
San ford 
Bangor 
Belfast 
Caribou 
Brewer 



2 A E House 
* T A House 

Street, Bangor 

Summer Street 

2 X House 

Old Town 

2 X House 

$ H K House 

Mill Street 

Mill Street 

209 H. H. Hall 

Main Street 

X House 

102 Main Street 

Gilbert Street 

Gilbert Street 

112 Oak Hall 

Old Town 

309 Oak Hall 

Spencer Street 

College Street 

Park Street 

Brewer 



259 



Catalog of Students 



Small, Melville Lee, Pm. 
Smallidge, Orman Samuel, Me. 
Smargonsky, Isaac, Arts 
Smiley, Floyd Franklin, Ag. 
Smiley, Samuel Raymond, Ag. 
Smith, Cecil Kendrick, Ag. 
Smith, Dana Gerald, Ee. 
Smith, Faye, Arts 
Smith, Raymond James, Me. 
Smith, Roy Harold, Me. 
Somers, Roy Merry, Ag. 
Southard, Freemon Lennox, Ee. 
Spear, Estelle Paulina, He. 
Stacy, Percy Arthur, Ag. 
Stanley, Watson Frank, Arts 
Staples, Harold Sanborn, Eng. 
Steadman, Donald Melville, Arts 
Stephenson, Clarence Baker, Ch. 
Stevens, Stanley Alonzo, Ee. 
Stevenson, William Stanley, Ee. 
Stewart, Clyde Wentworth, Ch. 

Eng. 
Stoddard, Edgar Addington, Ch. 
Stratton, Horace Evans, Ee. 
Strout, Harold Kimball, Ee. 
Stubbs, Marian Esther, He. 
Sturgis. Alfred Chamberlain, Ag. 
Suttie, Thomas Harold, Ag. 
Swan, William Francis, Ch. 
Sweatt, Cecil Clayton, Arts 
Swicker, Lester Clayton, Ee. 
Taylor, Enid Dorothy, Arts 
Taylor, William Henry, Arts 
Thomas, Albert Hale, Arts 
Thomas, John Harold, Arts 
Thompson, Bernard Vinal, Ch. 
Thompson, George Edward, Ag. 
Thompson, Newton Bartlett, Ce. 
Tibbetts, Louis Elmore, Ag. 
Tierney, Arthur Joseph, Me. 



Stonington 

Northeast Harbor 

Ashland 

Caribou 

Waterville 

Brookline, Mass. 

Vinal haven 

Machias 

South Brewer 

Fayette 

Portland 

Wise asset 

Portland 

Foxcroft 

Springvale 

Carthage 

B rid g ton 

Portland 

East Lynn, Mass. 

Thorn dike 



Saco 

Portland 

Hancock 

Portland 

Bucksport 

Auburn 

Waterville 

Berlin, N. H. 

Andover 

Townsend, Mass. 

North Sullivan 

Rum ford 

Lincoln 



Main Street 

Park Street 

Park Street 

403 H. H. Hall 

H. H. Hall 

Ben House 

401 H. H. Hall 

North Hall 

9 X House 

Park Street 

ATA House 

A X A House 

Balentine Hall 

2 A E House 

Ben House 

Myrtle Street 

Stillwater 

307 Oak Hall 

$ T A House 

Park Street 



A T n House 

in Oak Hall 

2 A E House 

404 H. H. Hall 

Mt. Vernon House 

202 H. H. Hall 
310 H. H. Hall 
Pleasant Street 

Spencer Street 

203 H. H. Hall 
Balentine Hall 
409 Oak Hall 
$ K 2 House 



Turner's Falls, Mass. 8 Hill Street 



Easton 
Bangor 
Gardiner 

Cambridge, Mass. 
Wcstfield, Mass. 



Main Street 
e X House 

Ben House 
Park Street 

2 A E House 



260 



Catalog of Students 



Titcomb, Leslie Burton, Arts 
Torrey, Norman Elvin, Arts 
Towne, Leland Charles, Ch. Eng. 
Tozier, Alton Warren, Me. 
Tracy, Frank Alton, Ee. 
Trask, Newell Jefferson, Ag. 
Trecartin, Julian Edward, Arts 
True, Nathan Frank, Eng. 
True, Norman Evans, Eng. 
Tupper, Ernest Grant, Ag. 
Turgeon, Henry Wallace, Ch. 
Tuttle, Rubie Margaret, He. 
Upham, Warren Pratt, Fy. 
Vancore, Dixon Frederick, Law 

Vaughan, Malcolm, Ag. 
Wade, Elmer Joseph, Eng. 
Wallingford, Vernon Howard, Ch. 

Eng. 
Webber, Paul Franklin, Ag. 
Weeks, Donald Ross, Ag. 
Weisman, Samuel, Ee. 
Wellington, Linwood Wiley, Ch. 
Wellington, William Herbert, Fy. 
West, Frank Raymond, Ee. 
Weymouth, Merle McCausland, Fy. 
Whalen, Oscar Livermore, Arts 
Wheeler, Ella Adams, Arts 
Whitehouse, Ralph Murch, Arts. 
Whitehouse, Thurle Stevens, Ee. 
Wiggin, Paul Esmond, Ce. 
Wight, Willard, Ce. 
Wilkins, Ralph Allen, Ch. 
Williams, Randall Vaughan, Ag. 
Winslow, Willis Stone, Eng, 
Winter, Clifford Maurice, Ee. 
Wood, Ralph Harold, Ee. 
Woodsum, Esther Madeline, He. 
Wooster, Kenneth Thorndike, Arts 
Wylde, Paul Linton, Ch. 



K am chunk 
Stonington 
Madison 
Litchfield 
Cherry field 



412 Oak Hall 

K 2 House 

304 H. H. Hali 

Park Street 
Park Street 



South Jefferson North Main Street 
Lubec 311 Oak Hall 

Frccport K 2 House 

Woodfords Grove Street 

Princeton 203 Oak Hall 

Auburn B n House 

Caribou 401 Balentine Hall 

Pasadena, Cal. 11 Pond Street 

Colebrook, N. H. 

173 Ohio Street, Bangor 
Belfast 303 Oak Hall 

Richmond Campus 



Auburn 

Kennebunk 

Rockland 

Portland 

Caribou 

South Royalton, Vt 

Old Town 

Howland 

Eastport 

Bangor Mt. 

Fort Fairfield 

Portland 

Winthrop 

Berlin, N. H. 

Beverly, Mass. ! 

Lisbon Falls 

Waldoboro 

King field 

Togus 

Dix field 

Rockport 

Lawrence, Mass. 



205 Oak Hall 

412 Oak Hall 

Park Street 

206 Oak Hall 

$ K 2 House 

Campus 

Old Town 

401 Oak Hall 

306 Oak Hall 

Vernon House 

2 X House 

312 Oak Hall 

9 X House 

Mayo Street 

88 Main Street 

204 Oak Hall 

404 Oak Hall 

ATA House 

K 2 House 

North Hall 

Park Street 

2 X House 



261 



Catalog of Students 

Yeaton, Russell Powers, Ag. Belgrade Spearen's Inn 

Young, Kenneth Thwing, Arts Arlington, Mass. 2 X House 

Young, Thomas Jefferson, Jr., Me. Solon A T Q House 

Ziegler, Charles Melvin, Ag. So. Boston, Mass. B 9 IT House 



SPECIALS 



Beach, Dorothea, Arts 
Bieler, Alexander Bert, Law 

Bisbee, Francis Wilbert, Ht. 
Blais, Frank Phillip, Law 
Blanchard, Everard Eells, Bl. 

Brooks, Samuel Stevens, Ed. 
Brown, Kenneth Parker, Me. 
Brownstein, Abraham Abe, Law 

Campbell, Charles Francis, Ce. 
Carter, Lauriston Folger, Ph. 
Chamberlain, Newell Burnap, Es. 
Clarke, Joseph Lawrence, Law 

Conquest, Edward James, Law 
Corey, Solomon, Ce. 
Crowley, Wallace Edgar, Law 
Curtis, Paul Cate, Ag. 
Curtis, Walter Edson, Bl. 
Davis, Arthur Linwood, Ee. 
Dodge, Richard Boulsby, Ph. 
Fames, Clayton Earle, Law 

Flanagan, William Joseph, Law 

St. Anselm's College 
Gallagher, James Augustine, Law 
Gallagher, William Wallace, Law 
Gillin, George Henry, Law 
Gould, Melville Asher, Ph. 
Hackett, Rhonello Con ant, Law 
Hamlin, Emery Leroy, Fy. 
Mauley, Michael John. Law 



Bangor Mill Street 

New York, N. Y. 

183 York Street, Bangor 
East Sumner Middle Street 

Portland 176 Court Street, Bangor 
Buenos Aires, Argentina, S. A. 

Forest Avenue 
Orono Middle Street 

Portland ATA House 

East Surry 

215 Maple Street, Bangor 
Ellsworth ATA House 

Braintrec, Mass. Park Street 

Cambridge, Mass. 102 H. H. Hall 
Waterville 

116 Sanford Street, Bangor 
Bangor 88 Sidney Street, Bangor 
Bangor 258 Hancock Street, Bangor 
Bangor 10 Chester Place, Bangor 
Swampscott, Mass. in H. H. Hall 
Stillwater Stillwater 

Auburn 9 X House 

Machias 211 Oak Hall 

North Anson 

55 Fourth Street, Bangor 
Ellsworth 313 State Street, Bangor 



Bangor 

Limestone 

Bangor 

Old Town 

Pittsfield 

Portland 

Bangor 



34 Elm Street, Bangor 

The Colonial, Bangor 

119 Pine St., Bangor 

Old Town 

The Hayward, Bangor 

88 Main Street 

101 Fern Street, Bangor 



262 



Catalog of Students 



Hitchings, Samuel Lord, Ht. 
James, Pearl, He. 
Jewett, Donald Campbell, Law 
Joyce, Alvah Barbour, Arts 
Kimball, Millard Allan, Law 
King, Fred Rollins, Me. 
Ladner, Roy Alexander, Arts 
Lane, Orlando Hook, Law 
Leighton, Arthur Whiting, Ag. 
Lemont, Herbert Randall, Fy. 
Little, Joseph Louis, Law 
Little, Nellie Ursula, Arts 
Mahoney, Edmund Patrick, Law 
Mann, Josephine Estelle, He. 
Marquis, Joseph Augustin, Law 

Colby College 
Miller, Harold Ames, Arts 
Mooney, Maria Augusta, He. 
Morris, Abraham, Law 
Morse, Earle Howard, Ch. 
Mulvaney, Harry Thomas, Law 
Neal, Levi Ernest, Law 

Newdick, Erlon Lincoln, Ag. 
Noyes, Garth Albert, Ee. 
Osier, Janette, He. 
Payson, Walter Mayo, Law 

Colby College 
Perkins, Edward Adolphus, Ee. 
Prescott, Glenn Carleton, Fy 
Riley, James Vincent, Law 
Robinson, Albert Lealand, Ph. 
Savage, Frank John, Es. 
Siddall, Cecil James, Law 
Sidelinger, Claude Lyndon, Ed. 
Smith, Royal Howard Gould, Ee. 
Spaulding, Earl Williams, Ag. 
Stanton, John Clifford, Ph. 
Stevens, Norris Frederick, Law 



Orono Pleasant Street 

Orono 75 North Main Street 

Cherry field 62 Court Street, Bangor 
Portland Oak Street 

Biddeford 166 Union Street, Bangor 
Fairfield Grove Street 

Orono Park Street 

Topsfield 173 Ohio Street, Bangor 
Abington, Mass. University Inn 
Bath 2 A E House 

Portland 59 Essex Street, Bangox 
Portland Mt. Vernon House 

Portland 84 Cedar Street, Bangor 
Orono Main Street 

Waterville 

21 Sanford Street, Bangor 
Portland Pond Street 

Orono Main Street 

Bangor 36 Essex Street, Bangor 
Orono 211 Oak Hall 

Bangor 199 Pine Street, Bangor 
Bangor 

245 Parkview Avenue, Bango^ 
Sanford K 2 House 

Orono Forest Avenue 

Orono Main Street 

South Hope 

19 Fourth Street, Bangor 
Old Orchard 2 X House 

Kezar Falls $ H K House 

Madison 55 Fourth Street, Bangor 
South Windham X House 

Fairfield K 2 House 

Sanford 17 Fourth Street, Bangor 
Washington College Street 

Gorham 2 X House 

Solon $ H K House 

South Thomaston 402 Oak Hall 
Rockland 

212 Center Street, Old Town 



263 



Catalog of Students 



Suke forth, Raymond Oscar, Law 

Sullivan, John Anthony, Law 

Thorne, Gertrude, Arts 
Thornton, Lorenzo Ernest, Law 

Colby College 
Urbano, Angelo Joseph, Law 
Ware, John, Law 

Colby College 
Watson, James Bennett, Law 
Whitney, Raymond Lee, Fy. 
Willey, Walter Francis, Ag. 
Woods, Harry Morgan, Ag. 

B. A., University of Maine, 



Fort Fairfield 

62 Court Street, Bangor 
Nashua, N. H. 

64 Sanford Street, Bangor 
Newport Newport 

Houlton 211 Union Street, Bangor 

Portland 59 Essex Street, Bangor 
Waterville 

The Hayward, Bangor 
Bangor The Colonial, Bangor 

North Anson 307 H. H. Hall 

Kent's Hill 2 A E House 

Orono Main Street 

1909 



TWO YEAR PHARMACY 



SECOND YEAR 



Blanchet, Earle Oliver 
Demers, Odias Joseph 
Grant, Horace Elwin 
Hargreaves, Frank Irving 
Leighton, Lester Howard 
Mackin, William James 
O'Leary, Edwin Dolan 
Parker, Chester Robert 
Staples, Carroll Russell 



Berridge, Frank Edward 
Clark, Charles Wesley 
Clark, Roger Hopkins 
Crommett, Vinal Webster 
Dorfman, Samuel 
Huntoon, Hayden Sherman 
Mackenzie, Gerald LeRoy 
Richards, Carl Arthur 
Simpson, Helen Antoinette 



Northampton, Mass. Spearen's Inn 



Sanford 

Waterville 

Sanford 

Orono 

Millinocket 

Bangor 

Blue hill 

Norridgewock 



405 H. H. Hall 

103 Oak Hall 

405 H. H. Hall 

College Street 

6 X House 

Ben House 

204 H. H. Hall 



64 Lincoln Street, Bangor 



FIRST YEAR 



Lynn, Mass 

Norway 

Frankfort 

Millinocket 

Portland 

Rangeley 

West Franklin 

Van Buren 

Waterville 



80 Main Street 

103 H. H. Hall 

Pierce Street 

College Street 

206 Oak Hall 

Spearen's Inn 

203 Oak Hall 

6 X House, 

North Hall 



264 



Catalog of Students 



Beckett, Mary Newton 
Burleigh, Mollie Geneva 
Clapp, Grace Elizabeth 



HOME ECONOMICS 

SECOND YEAR 

Calais Mt. Vernon House 

Biddeford Mt. Vernon House 

West Somerville, Mass. 

Balentine Hall 



Clark, Lucile Greeley 
Clark, Edith Gertrude 
Folley, Veda Desire 
Jones, Mildred Iva 
Leighton, Mildred Estelle 
Perry, Emma Spring 
Pike, Helen 
Royal, Erma Lucile 
Taylor, Helen Perley 
Thomas, Marion Louise 



Corcoran, Pauline 
Davis, Anita Mae 
Eastman, Doris Burkett 
Hamor, Gladys Leone 

Little, Aleida Elizabeth 
McCann, Mary Elizabeth 
Meade, Mildred Leila 
Murphy, Rachel Virginia 
Osier, Bertha 
Pretto, Theresa Helen 
Prince, Jessie May 
Srtw>er, Lula Frances 



Orono 




Main Street 


Peaks Island 




Balentine Hall 


Sangerville 




Forest Avenue 


Unity 




Forest Avenue 


Orono 




College Street 


Machias 




North Hall 


Monmouth 




Balentine Hall 


Houlton 


Mt. 


Vernon House 


Peabody, Mass Mt. 


Vernon House 


Newbury port, 


Mass. 






Balentine. Hall 


FIRST YEAR 






PorVand 




Main Street 


Jefferson 




North Hall 


Warren 




North Hall 


Bangor 






22 Kenduskeag Avenue, Bangor 


Portland 


Mt 


. Vernon House 


Bangor 74 


Birch 


Street, Bangor 


Saco 




North Hall 


Portland 




Balentine Hall 


Orono 




Main Street 


Bangor 50 


Pine 


Street, Bangor 


Yarmouth 




Balentine Hall 



Brewer 



Brewer 



SCHOOL COURSE IN AGRICULTURE 



SECOND YEAR 



Bennett, Harry Stowe 
F.stes, Harold Dudley 
Fowler, John Earl 
Hobbs, Ellsworth Joseph 



Millbury, Mass. 
Sear sport 
Portland 
Mattawamkeag 



Grove Street 

208 Oak Hall 

Park Street 

404 H. H. Hall 



265 



Catalog of Students 



Lambert, Leon Elwin 
Leavitt, Lloyd Foss 
Martin, Edwin Clarence 
Moore, Joseph Henry, Jr. 
Roberts, George Edward 
Sherman, Reid Myles 
Snow, Vergne Rockwood 
Trueworthy, George Fay 



Adams, Carl Frank 
Allen, Herbert Marsena 
Bean, Francis Albion 
Benson, Alton Howard 
Beverage, Arthur Walter 
Bickford, Harry Elmer 
Brackett, Herman Cook 
Brown, Earl Stanley 
Chapin, Philip Edmund 
Donaldson, Laurene Everit 
Ebeling, George Frank 
Field, Kenneth Jackman 
Hagstrom, Conrad Walfrid 
Hayes, Fred Lindall 
Jacobs, Franklin Oscar 
Kyes, Howard Ernest 
Kyes, Ralph Granville 
Libby, Alton Bert 
Lowell, Carleton White 
Marshall, Mason Henry 
Parker, Stanley Bradbury 
Pendleton, Raymond Fowles 
Pratt, Charles Lewis 
Smith, John Herbert 
Sullivan, Daniel Cleveland 
Thomas, Fletcher Alton 
Thompson, Arthur Weight 
Weeks, Harold Cass 
Worthley. Clifford Nelson 
Wright, William Trott 



Brewer Brewer 

Guilford 201 H. H. Hall 

Liberty Park Street 

Winthrop Campus 

Weeks Mills Campus 

Island Falls Campus 

Portland ATfl House 

Mattawamkeag 404 H. H. Hall 



FIRST YEAR 



Kennebunkport 

Bangor 

Bethel 

Kennebunkport 

North Haven 

Searsmont 

Portland 

Presque Isle 

Saco 

Stockton Springs 

New York City 

Guilford 

Auburn, Mass. 

Foxcroft 

West Berlin, Mass, 

North Jay 

North Jay 

Oakland 

Bath 

Top sham 

South Leeds 

Camden 

Yarmouthville 

Houlton 

Lubec 

Leeds Center 

Portland 

Marlboro, Mass. 

Strong 

Woolwich 



405 Oak Hall 

Park Street 

308 Oak Hall 

405 Oak Hall 

109 H. H. Hall 

Park Street 

304 H. H Hall 

Park Street 

Grove Street 

Main Street 

305 H. H. Hall 

212 H. H. Hall 

Grove Street 

Grove Street 

303 Oak Hall 

105 Oak Hall 

105 Oak Hall 

A T House 

104 H. H. Hall 

College Street 

202 H. H. Hall 

Peters Street 

Spearen's Inn 

Main Street 

Park Street 

Spearen's Inn 

306 Oak Hall 

Grove Street 

Grove Street 

Pond Street 



266 



General Summary 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



FACULTY 

President x 

Professors 4 1 

Associate Professors 17 

Assistant Professors 16 

Extension Representatives 16 

Instructors 47 

Lecturers 8 

Assistants 8 

Total 154 

College of Agriculture 39 

College of Arts and Sciences 48 

Agricultural Experiment Station 15 

College of Law 11 

College of Technology 33 

Officers common to all Colleges 8 

154 

STUDENTS 

Graduate students 46 

Seniors 153 

Juniors 216 

Sophomores 226 

Freshmen 406 

Specials 71 

Two Year Pharmacy, Second Year 9 

First Year 9 18 

Two Year Home Economics, Second Year 13 

First Year 12 25 

267 



General Summary 



School Course Agriculture, First Year 

Second Year 
Summer Term 



30 
12 



42 
132 



Total (omitting duplicates, 66) 



1269 



CLASSIFICATION BY RESIDENCE 



Maine, by counties : 
Androscoggin 
Aroostook 
Cumberland 
Franklin 
Hancock 
Kennebec 
Knox 
Lincoln 
Oxford 
Penobscot 
Piscataquis 
Sagadahoc 
Somerset 
Waldo 
Washington 
York 

California 

Connecticut 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

Indiana 

Kentucky 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

New Hampshire 

New York 

Ohio 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

Vermont 



65 

47 

169 

29 

64 
70 

33 
20 
36 
294 
30 
21 
42 



68 1064 

3 

12 
1 
1 
1 
1 
132 
1 
22 

13 

1 

5 
2 

3 



268 



General Summary 



Wisconsin 


2 




Argentina 


2 




China 


2 




India 


I 


205 

1269 


CLASSIFICATION BY COLLEGES 






Graduate students 


46 




College of Agriculture 


331 




College of Arts and Sciences 


343 




College of Law- 


IOI 




College of Technology 


448 





1269 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREES 

Graduate students 
College of Agriculture 
College of Arts and Sciences 
College of Law 
College of Technology 



46 
243 
288 

69 
438 



The following students registered in short courses given in the Col- 
lege of Agriculture : 



Name 


Course Home Address 


Andrews, Alfred D. 


Horticulture West Paris, R. F. D. 1 


Archibald, Roy 


Horticulture Sebago 


Bartlett, E. F. 


General Agriculture Bangor 




155 Parkview Ave. 


Bartlett, Philip 


Dairying Island Pond, Vt. 


Bowie, Hubert A. 


Poultry Husbandry Lisbon 


Briggs, William 


Horticulture Brewer 


Burnell, Guy D. 


General Agriculture St. Albans, Vt. 


Butler, Julian A. 


Poultry Husbandry Egypt 


Byers, Edw. A. 


Horticulture, Bangor, 15 State Street 


Davis, Atwood 


Horticulture Caribou 


Hardy, C. E. 


General Agriculture Bangor 




124 Parkview Ave. 


Harris, Oscar S. 


Dairying Stockton Springs 


Hodgkins, Clarence T. 


Poultry South Brewer 



269 



General Summary 



Holman, Myron L. 
Humphrey, Herman O. 
Hurley, Wilfred G. 
Lane, Ralph W. 
Long, Arthur F. 
Luce, Neil F. 
Merrill, Carl N. 
Mitchell, Irving S. 
Norton, Ernestine 

Perkins, Ralph 
Robinson, Fred 
Smith, Walter 
Soule, Clayton J. 
Stone, A. B. 
Talbot, George W. 
Vincent, P. J. 

Weight, William F. 
Wellman, Marion J. 
White, Harold S. 



Horticulture Dixfield 

Dairying Island Pond, Vt. 

Poultry Frankfort 

Poultry So. Portland, R. F. D. 8 

Poultry Husbandry Hallowell 

Agriculture Strong 

Poultry So. Portland, R. F. D. 8 

Poultry Bar Harbor 

Poultry Husbandry 

Portland, R. F. D. 4 
Agriculture Baileyville 

Agriculture Cumberland Center 

Dairying Bangor, 15 State Street 

Poultry So. Freeport 

Poultry Brownville 

Dairying Turner 

General Agriculture 

Cornville, R. F. D. 7 
Poultry Veazie 

Poultry Lewiston, 9 Arch Avenue 
General Agriculture Lewiston 



270 



Index 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

Absence from examinations 34 

Administration, officers of 7 

Advanced standing 42 

Admirality 160 

Admission 42 

Agricultural Chemistry 87 

Agricultural Engineering 89 

Agricultural Experiment Station 209 

Council 6 

Agriculture, College of 61 

Agronomy courses 80 

curriculum 66 

Alpha Zeta 32 

Alternating Currents 194 

Alumni Advisory Council 218 

Alumni Associations 218 

Animal Industry courses 82 

curriculum 66 

Appointments 220 



Archeology 

Architecture 

Art 

Art Museum 

Arts and Sciences, College of. 

Associations 

Astronomy 

Athletic field 

Bacteriology 

Battalion 



135 

106 

106 

30 

98 

30 

108 

26 

85 

222 

Bibliography 109 



PAGE 

87 

109 

57 

109 

23 

113 

3 

26 

31 

44 

74 

1C6 

181 

169 

58 

32 

Civil Engineering courses 188 

curriculum 171 

Commencement exercises, 1915. . 224 
Committees of the Faculty .... 21 

Cookery 94 

Correspondence courses ........ 78 

Criminal Law 161 

Curricula 59 

Agriculture 64 

Agronomy 66 

Animal Industry 66 

Arts and Sciences 101 



Biological Chemistry 

Biology courses 

entrance 

Botany 

Buildings and equipment 

Business Law 

Calendar 

Central heating plant 

Cercle Francais 

Certificate, admission by 

Certificates in Agriculture 

Chemical Engineering curricu 

lum 

Chemistry courses 

curriculum 

entrance 

Christian Association 



Chemistry 169 



271 



University of Maine 



PAGE 

Chemical Engineering 166 

Civil Engineering 171 

Electrical Engineering 173 

Forestry . 70 

Home Economics 71 

Horticulture 68 

Law 160 

Mechanical Engineering... 175 

Pharmacy 177 

Dairy courses 67 

winter courses 75 

Debate 155 

Declamations 154 

sophomore prize 40 

Degrees 34 

advanced 35 

Degrees conferred, 1915 247 

Deposits 39 

Dormitories 38 

Drawing 201 

Economics 113 

Education courses 116 

Electrical Engineering courses. 194 

curriculum 171 

Embryology Ill 

English courses 121 

entrance 47 

English Literature 125 

Entomology 110 

Entrance 44 

Essays 122 

Establishment of the University 22 

Evidence 161 

Examinations, entrance 55 

Expenses 37 

Experiment Station 209 

Extension work in Agriculture. 76 



PAGE 

Faculty, University 8 

Agriculture 61 

Arts and Sciences 98 

Experiment Station 228 

Law 158 

Technology 164 

Farm Management 89 

Fees 37 

laboratory 38 

Forestry courses 90 

curriculum 10 

Fraternity houses 26 

French courses 129 

entrance 50 

Geological collection 28 

Geology 87 

German courses 132 

entrance 52 

Gothic 134 

Graduation, requirements for... 64, 101 

Greek courses 135 

Greek architecture 107 

Herbarium 29 

Histology, Animal Ill 

Plant HI 

History courses 138 

entrance 56 

Home economic courses 93 

curriculum 71 

short courses 73 

Honorary societies 32 

Honors 34 

conferred, 1915 220 

Horticulture courses 95 

curriculum 68 

Hydraulics 191 

Incidentals 37 

Industrial Chemistry 185 



272 



Index 



PAGE 

Infirmary 26 

Insurance 1G2 

Italian 150 

Journalism 103 

Junior Exhibition 40 

speakers, 1915 220 

Kidder scholarship 40 

Kittredge loan fund. . . 39 

Laboratory charges 38 

Landscape Gardening 96 

Latin 140 

Law, College of 158 

Library , 25, 1:7 

Loans 39 

Logic . .. 1-18 

Lumbering 93 

Machine Design 1S8 

Maine Masque 31 

Major instructors 101 

Materia Medica 202 

Mathematics courses 143 

entrance 56 

Mechanical Engineering courses 197 

curriculum 175 

Mechanics 201 

Mechanics and Drawing 201 

Medicine, preparation for 103 

Meteorology 150 

Military courses 205 

Museum 28 

Observatory 26 

Optics 151 

Organic Chemistry 183 

Organization of the University. 59 

Organizations 30 

Pharmacy 202 

curricula 177 

Fhi Kappa Phi 32 

members 220 



PAGE 

Philosophy 148 

Physical Chemistry 187 

Physical Geography 58 

Physical Training courses 207 

Physics courses 150 

entrance 58 

Physiology Ill 

Political Economy 113 

Poultry Husbandry courses 84 

Power House 26 

Precision of Measurements 152 

Prescriptions 2C3 

Prizes 40 

awarded, 1915 223 

Psychology 148 

Public Speaking 154 

Publications 33 

Radio-activity 152 

Reading Room 27 

Regulations of the University.. 34 

Required courses 205 

Requirements, for admission 44 

Rhetoric 121 

Roman Numismatics 142 

Roman Philosophy 141 

Rooms 38 

R oms for women 38 

Rule of conduct 34 

Sanskrit 142 

Scholarship honors 34 

Scholarships 40 

School Course in Agriculture... 74 

Short Courses in Agriculture... 75 

Silviculture 92 

Societies 30 

Sociology 114 

Sophomore prize declamations.. 40 

speakers, 1915 220 

Spanish 156 



273 



University of Maine 



PAGE 

Spanish and Italian 156 

Steam Engineering 199 

Student expenses 37 

Students, catalog of 232 

classification of 267 

number of 269 

Studies, quota of 34 

Structures 192 

Summer Term 214 

expenses 216 

Surveying 189 

Tau Beta Pi 32 

Technology, College of 164 

faculty 164 

Theology, preparation for 103 

Theses 37 

Torts 163 

Treasurer 7 



PAGE 

Trustees, Board of 5 

executive committee of.... 5 

Tuition charges 37 

University, history of 22 

buildings and equipment. 23 

bulletins 33 

establishment 22 

location 23 

object 22 

organization 59 

Veterinary Science 85 

Winter courses 75 

Woodwork 197 

Women, admission of 42 

Worship, public 33 

Young Women's Christian As- 
sociation 32 

Zoology courses 109 

collections 29 



274 




KEY TO MAP 

1 Athletic Field 

2 Grand Stand 

3 Beta Theta Pi House 

4 Tennis Courts 

5 Pumping Station 

6 Janitor's House 

7 Oak Hall 

8 Wingate Hall 

9 Fernald Hall 

10 Power House 

11 Alumni Hall 

12 University Press 

13 Coburn Hall 

14 President's House 

15 Observatory 

16 Horticultural Building 

17 Holmes Hall 

18 Home Economics 
Laboratory 

19 Stable 

20 Dairy 

21 Barns 

22 Farm Superintendent's 
House 

23 Professor's House 

24 Kappa Sigma House 

25 Mt Vernon House 

26 Phi Gamma Delta House 

27 B. O. & O. Waiting 
Rooms 

28 Lord Hall 

29 Phi Epsilon Pi House 

30 Phi Kappa Sigma House 

31 Sigma Alpha Epsilon 



32 Store House 

33 Infirmary 

34 Library 

35 Farm Buildings 

36 Heating Plant 
17 Winslow Hall 

38 Theta Chi House 

39 Phi Eta Kappa House 

40 Stock Judging Pavilion 

41 Delta Tau Delta House 

42 Hannibal Hamlin Hall 

43 Professors' Houses 

44 Estabrooke Hall 

45 Balentine Hall 

46 Baseball Grand 
Stand 

47 Aubert Hall 

48 Sigma Nu House 

49 Carpenter Shop 




KEY TO MAP 

1 Athletic Field 

2 Grand Stand 

3 Beta Theta Pi House 

4 Tennis Courts 

5 Pumping Station 

6 Janitor's House 

7 Oak Hall 

8 Wingate Hall 

9 Fernald Hall 

10 Power House 

11 Alumni Hall 

12 University Press 

13 Coburn Hall 

14 President's House 

15 Observatory 

16 Horticultural Building 

17 Holmes Hall 

18 Home Economics 
Laboratory 



22 Farm Superintendent's 

23 Professor's House 

24 Kappa Sigma House 

25 Mt Vernon House 

26 Phi Gamma Delta House 

27 B. O. & O. Waiting 
Rooms 

28 Lord Hall 
Epsilon Pi House 

30 Phi Kappa Sigma House 

31 Sigma Alpha Epsilon 



36 Heating Plant 
V Winslow Hall 
(8 Theta Chi House 

39 Phi Eta Kappa House 

40 Stock Judging Pavilion 

41 Delta Tau Delta House 

42 Hannibal Hamlin Hall 

43 Professors' Houses 

44 Estabrooke Hall 

45 Balentine Hall 

46 Baseball Grand 

47 Aubert Hall 

48 Sigma Nu House 

49 Carpenter Shop 



CATALOG O? THE 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



1916-1917 




ORONO, MAINE 



THE UNIVERSITY PRESS 

ORONO, MAINE 

1916 



*•• • • • • • •*• 












1917 


1918 


JULY 


'jaVuXry 


JULY 


JANUARY 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T P 8 


8 M T W T F S 


1 


.. 12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 Id 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 


.... 12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 . . 


2 3 4 3 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 8 


.... 12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 . . 


j 2 3 

4 5 *6 *7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 . . 




MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T F S 


8 M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 8 


1 2 


2 2 3 

4 5 6 *7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 


1 2 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


OCTOBER 


APRII, 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 

NOVEMBER 


12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 


..123456 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 

NOVEMBER 


..123456 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 

MAY 


MAY 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 8 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 . . 


.... 12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 . . 


1 2 3 
4 5 6 *7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 . . 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


8 M T W T P S 


S M T W T P 8 
1 2 


S M T W T F 8 
1 


8 M T W T P 3 
1 


3 4 5 6 7 9 
10 11 12 13 14 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 18 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

%\ 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 









CALENDAR 



FALL SEMESTER, 1916 



September 15-19, 

September 20, 
September 21, 



Wednesday, 
Thursday, 



November 30, Thursday, 
December 20, Wednesday, 



Arrearage examinations; entrance 

examinations 
Registration, 8.00 A. M.— 5.00 P.M. 
Registration, 8.00 A. M.— 5.00 P. M. 

First chapel, 10.30 A. M. 
Thanksgiving Day, a holiday 
Christmas recess begins, 5.05 P. M. 



1917 



January 


4, 


Thursday, 


February 


2, 


Friday, 
SPRING 


February 


3, 


Saturday, 


February 


5, 


Monday, 


February 


22, 


Thursday, 


March 


21, 


Wednesday, 


March 


29, 


Thursday, 


April 


19, 


Thursday, 


May 


30, 


Wednesday, 


June 


6-9, 




June 


10, 


Sunday, 


June 


11, 


Monday, 


June 


12, 


Tuesday, 


June 


13, 


Wednesday, 



Christmas recess ends, 8.00 A. M. 
Fall semester ends, 5.05 P. M. 



Registration 

Spring semester begins, 8.00 A. M. 
Washington's Birthday, a holiday 
Spring recess begins, 5.05 P. M. 
Spring recess ends, 8.00 A. M. 
Patriot's Day, a holiday 
Memorial Day, a holiday 
Entrance examinations 
Baccalaureate address 
Class Day 

Meeting of Board of Trustees 
Commencement, 9.30 A. M. 



SUMMER TERM 



June 25, Monday, Summer Term begins, 8.00 A. M. 

August 3, Friday, Summer Term ends 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



September 14-18, 

September 19, 
September 20, 
November 29, 
December 19, 



FALL SEMESTER, 1917 

Arrearage examinations; entrance 
examinations 
Wednesday, Registration, 8.00 A. M. 

Thursday, Registration ; first chapel, 10.30 A. M. 

Thursday, Thanksgiving Day, a holiday 

Wednesday, Christmas recess begins, 5.05 P. M. 

1918 



January 3, Thursday, Christmas recess ends, 8.00 A. M. 

February 1, Friday, Fall semester ends, 5.05 P. M. 

SPRING SEMESTER, 1918 

February 2, Saturday, Registration 

February 4, Monday, Spring semester begins, 8 A.M. 

June 12, Wednesday, Commencement 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Hon. Samuel Wads worth Gould, B. S., President Skowhegan 

Term expires April 16, 1921 
Edwin James Haskell, B. S. Westbrook 

Term expires December 31, 1916 
Hon. Charles Lester Jones Corinna 

Term expires April 17, 1917 
Freeland Jones, LL. B. Bangor 

Term expires May 31, 1918 
Charles Swan Bickford, B. S. Belfast 

Term expires April 13, 1919 
Hon. William Henry Looney, B. A. Portland 

Term expires September 10, 1921 
Hon. Frederick Hastings Strickland Bangor 

Term expires April 28, 1922 
Thomas Vincent Doherty, A. B., Clerk Houlton 

Term expires May 7, 1920 



Executive Committee: Gould, F. Jones, and Strickland 
Farm Committee: F. Jones and C. L. Jones 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

MAINE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT 
STATION COUNCIL 



Robert Judson Aley, Ph. D., LL. D. President 

Charles Dayton Woods, Sc. D. Secretary 

Freeland Jones, LL. B., Bangor ~\ Committee 

of 

Charles Lester Jones, Corinna ) Trustees 

Leon Stephen Merrill, M. D., Orono 

Dean of the College of Agriculture 
William Trelawney Guptill, A. B., Topsham 

Commissioner of Agriculture 
Eugene Harvey Libby, Auburn State Grange 

Wilson Hiram Conant, Buckfield State Pomological Society 

Frank Samuel Adams, Bowdoinham State Dairymen's Association 
William George Hunton, Cherryfield 

Maine Seed Improvement Association 
Leonard Clement Holston, Cornish 

Maine Livestock Breeders' Association 
James Monroe Bartlett, M. S. 
Edith Marion Patch, Ph. D. 
Warner Jackson Morse, Ph. D. ( Members 

Raymond Pearl, Ph. D. ( of the 

Herman Herbert Hanson, M. S. } Station Staff 

Frank Macy Surface, Ph. D. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



OFFICERS OF ADMINSTRATION 



OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Robert Judson Aley, President 
James Norris Hart, Dean 
Charles John Dunn, Treasurer 
James Adrian Gannett, Registrar 



OF THE COLLEGES AND EXPERIMENT STATION 

Leon Stephen Merrill, Dean of the College of Agriculture 
James Stacy Stevens, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 
Charles Dayton Woods, Director of the Maine Agricultural Experiment 

Station 
William Emanuel Walz, Dean of the College of Law 
Harold Sherburne Boardman, Dean of the College of Technology 

OF OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

Ralph Kneeland Jones, Librarian 

William James Young, Director of Athletics 

Frank Sheldon Clark, In Charge of Military Instruction 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



^FACULTY OF INSTRUCTION AND 
INVESTIGATION 



Robert Judson Aley Campus 

President 

A. B., Indiana, 1888 ; A. M., 1890 ; Ph. D., University of Pennsylvania, 
1897; LL. D., Franklin, 1909 

James Monroe Bartlett 148 College Street 

Chemist in the Agricultural Experiment Station 

B. S, Maine, 1880 ; M. S., 1883 

Lucius Herbert Merrill 178 Main Street 

Professor of Biological and Agricultural Chemistry 
B. S., Maine, 1883; Sc. D., 1908 
James Norris Hart 130 College Street 

Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy 
Dean of the University 
B. C E, Maine, 1885; C. K, 1890; M. S., Chicago, 1897; Sc. D., 
Maine, 1908 

Fremont Lincoln Russell 124 Main Street 

Professor of Bacteriology and Veterinary Science 
B. S. Maine, 1885 ; V. S., New York College of Veterinary Sur- 
geons, 1886 

James Stacy Stevens 175 Main Street 

Professor of Physics 
Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 
B. S., Rochester, 1885; M. S., 1888, and Syracuse, 1889; LL. D., Roch- 
ester, 1907 

Charles Dayton Woods 133 Main Street 

Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station 
B. S., Wesleyan, 1880; Sc. D., Maine, 1905 



♦Arranged in groups in order of seniority of appointment 



FACULTY 



John Homer Huddilston 193 Main Street 

Professor of Greek and Classical Archeology 

A. B., Baldwin, 1890, and Harvard, 1893; Ph. D., Munich, 1897 

William Emanuel Walz 8 Fifth Street, Bangor 

Professor of Law 

Dean of the College of Law 

A. B., Northwestern College, 1880; A. M., 1882; LL. B., Harvard, 
1889; Litt. D., Bowdoin, 1911 

Ralph Kneeland Jones 57 Bennoch Street 

Librarian 

B. S., Maine, 1886 

Jacob Bernard Segall 7 Mill Street 

Professor of French 

B. S. and B. L., Yassy, 1884; Ph. D., Columbia, 1893 

Harold Sherburne Boardman 68 Main Street 

Professor and Head of the Department of Civil Engineering 

Dean of the College of Technology 

B. C. E., Maine, 1895; C. E., 1898 

George Davis Chase 143 Main Street 

Professor of Latin 

A. B., Harvard, 1889; A. M., 1895; Ph. D., 1897 

Caroline Colvin University Inn 

Professor of History 

A. B., Indiana, 1893; Ph. D., University of Pennsylvania, 1901 
Warner Jackson Morse . 1 North Main Street 

Plant Pathologist in the Agricultural Experiment Station 

B. S., Vermont, 1898; M. S., 1903; Ph. D., Wisconsin, 1912 
Charles Partridge Weston 356 College Street 

Professor of Mechanics and Drawing 
B. C. E., Maine, 1896; C. E., 1899; A. M., Columbia, 1902 
Raymond Pearl 166 College Street 

Biologist in the Agricultural Experiment Station 

A. B., Dartmouth, 1899; Ph. D., Michigan, 1902 

Charles Barto Brown 129 Main Street 

Professor of Civil Engineering 

Ph. B., Yale, 1894; C. E., 1896 

Wallace Craig 32 College Street 

Professor of Philosophy 

B. S., Illinois, 1898; M. S., 1901; Ph. D., Chicago, 1908 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Roland Palmer Gray 162 College Street 

Professor and Head of the Department of English 
A. B., Columbia, 1893; M. A., Rochester, 1908 
Garrett William Thompson 180 Main Street 

Professor of German 
A. B., Amherst, 1888; A. M., 1891; Ph. D., University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1907 

Guy Andrew Thompson 356 College Street 

Professor of English Literature 

A. B., Illinois, 1898, and Harvard, 1900; A. M., 1901; Ph. D., Chi- 
cago, 1912 

Windsor Pratt Daggett 36 College Street 

Professor of Public Speaking 

Ph. B., Brown, 1902 

Mintin Asbury Chrysler 370 College Street 

Professor of Biology 

B. A., Toronto, 1894; Ph. D., Chicago, 1904 

John Manvers Briscoe 380 College Street 

Professor of Forestry 
M. R, Yale, 1909 
Leon Stephen Merrill Campus 

Director of Agricultural Extension Service 
Dean of the College of Agriculture 
M. D., Bowdoin, 1889 
George Edward Simmons 4 Gilbert Street 

Professor of Agronomy 
B. S., Ohio Northern, 1902; M. S., 1905; B. Sc, Ohio State, 1909 
George Ware Stephens 158 College Street 

Professor of Economics and Sociology 
Ph. B., Iowa Wesleyan, 1904; M. A., Wisconsin, 1907; Ph. D., 1911 
William Edward Barrows, Jr. 36 Myrtle Street 

Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B. S., Maine, 1902; E. E., 1908 
Edgar Myrick Simpson 31 Highland Avenue, Bangor 

Professor of Law 

A. B., Bowdoin, 1894 

Bliss S Brown 42 Forest Avenue 

Professor of Horticulture 

B. S., Michigan Agricultural College, 1903; M. S., California, 1911 



10 



FACULTY 



Edith Marion Patch College Street 

Entomologist in the Agricultural Experiment Station 

B. S., Minnesota, 1901; M. S., Maine, 1910; Ph. D., Cornell, 1911 

Frank Macy Surface 142 Bennoch Street 

Biologist in the Agricultural Experiment Station 

A. B., Ohio State, 1914; A. M., 1915; Ph. D., University of Penn- 
sylvania, 1907 

Lamert Seymour Corbett Campus 

Professor of Animal Industry 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1909; M. S., State Uni- 
versity of Kentucky, 1913 

Frank Sheldon Clark 33 Bennoch Street 

Professor of Military Science and Tactics 
B. S., Norwich, 1909; Captain, Coast Artillery Corps, U. S. Army 
Andrew Paul Raggio 180 Main Street 

Professor of Spanish and Italian 
B. A., Texas, 1896; A. M., Harvard, 1902; Ph. D., 1904 
Frances Rowland Freeman University Inn 

Professor of Home Economics 
B. Sc, Ohio State, 1910; M. Sc, 1911 
Roy Franklin Richardson 47 Mill Street 

Professor of Education 

A. B., Kansas State Normal College, 1909; Ph. D., Clark, 1913 
William Jordan Sweetser 184 Main Street 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
S. B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1901 
Herman Herbert Hanson 80 Forest Avenue 

Chemist in the Agricultural Experiment Station 

B. S., Pennsylvania State College, 1902; M. S., Maine, 1906 
Charles Wilson Easley 41 Main Street 

Professor of Chemistry 
A. B, Dickinson, 1897; A. M., 1890; Ph. D., Clark, 1908 
William Ambrose Jarrett 36 Forest Avenue 

Professor of Pharmacy 
Pharm. D., Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 1913 
Clarence Webster Peabody 225 Cedar Street, Bangor 

Professor of Law 
A. B., Bowdoin, 1893; LL. B., Harvard, 1896 



11 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

William James Young University Inn 

Professor of Physical Culture 
Director of Athletics 
B. P. E., International Y. M. C. A. College, 1907; M. D., University 
of Pennsylvania, 1911 



Leon Elmer Woodman 61 Bennoch Street 

Associate Professor of Physics 

A. B., Dartmouth, 1899; A. M., 1902; Ph. D., Columbia, 1910 
James Adrian Gannett 167 Main Street 

Registrar 

B. S., Maine, 1908 
♦Albert Theodore Childs 

Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B. S., Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 1906; E. E., 1908 
Harley Richard Willard 56 Main Street 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

A. B. Dartmouth, 1899; A. M., 1902, and Yale, 1910; Ph. D., 1912 
Archer Lewis Grover 22 Myrtle Street 

Associate Professor of Drawing 

B. M. E., Maine, 1889; B. S., 1902 

Alice Middleton Boring 33 Mill Street 

Associate Professor of Zoology 

A. B., Bryn Mawr, 1904; A. M., 1905; Ph. D., 1910 

Julius Ernest Kaulfuss 11 Main Street 

Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 

B. S., Wisconsin, 1908 

James McCluer Matthews 55 North Main Street 

Associate Professor of Economics and Sociology 

A. B., Park, 1903; A. M., Harvard, 1913 

Daniel Wilson Pearce 31 Mill Street 

Associate Professor of Education 

A. B, Indiana, 1910; A. M., 1912 

Robert Rutherford Drummond 104 North Main Street 

Associate Professor of German 

B. S., Maine, 1905; Ph. D., University of Pennsylvania, 1909 
Carl Henry Lekberg 38 Forest Avenue 

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B. S., Maine, 1907 



♦Absent on leave, without pay, September 1, 1916, to September 1, 1917 

12 



FACULTY 



Embert Hiram Sprague University Inn 

Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 

B. S., Dartmouth, 1900 

Carleton Whidden Eaton 33 Mill Street 

Associate Professor of Forestry 

A. B., Bowdoin, 1910; M. R, Yale, 1912 

Harold Scott Osler 56 Forest Avenue 

Associate Professor of Agronomy 

B. S., Muskingum, 1909, and Michigan Agricultural College, 1913 
Truman Leigh Hamlin Stillwater 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
A. B., Western Reserve, 1899; M. A., Missouri, 1902 
Bartlett Brooks 16 North Park, Bangor 

Assistant Professor of Law 

A. B., Harvard, 1899; LL. B., 1902 

Harry Newton Conser 15 Oak Street 

Assistant Professor of Botany ) 

B. S., Central Pennsylvania College, 1883; M. S., 1886; A. M., 
Harvard, 1908 

Lloyd Meeks Burghart 35 Forest Avenue 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

A. B., Lake Forest, 1906; M. A., Maine, 1911 

Albert Guy Durgin 8 Middle Street 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B. S., Maine, 1908; M. S., 1909 

Alpheus Crosby Lyon 119 Bennoch Sreet 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 
B. S., Maine, 1902; S. B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
1904; C. K, Maine, 1913 

Lowell Jacob Reed 36 College Street 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B. S., Maine, 1907 ; M. S., 1912 ; Ph. D., University of Pennsylvania, 
1915 

Harry Woodbury Smith 384 College Street 

Assistant Professor of Bacteriology 

B. S., Maine, 1909 

Ralph Maynard Holmes 26 Mill Street 

Assistant Professor of Physics 

B. A., Maine, 1911; M. A., Wesleyan, 1913 



13 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Joseph Newell Stephenson 4 Gilbert Street 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
S. B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1909; M. S., Rose 
Polytechnic Institute, 1911 

Burnett Olcott McAnney University Inn 

Assistant Professor of English 

A. B., Dickinson, 1913; B. Lit, Columbia, 1914 

Frances Maria Whitcomb University Inn 

Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

S. B., Simmons, 1910 

Francois Joseph Kueny University Inn 

Assistant Professor of French 

B. es L., University of Paris, 1897; L. es L., Besancon, 1901 
John William Harvey 36 Myrtle Street 

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B. S., Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1913 
Herbert Hannibal Hillegas 67 Main Street 

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B. S., Delaware, 1914 
John Willard Kimball 36 Myrtle Street 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
B. S., Colby, 1912; Ph. D., Johns Hopkins, 1916 
William Samuel Krebs 13 Pond Street 

Assistant Professor of Economics and Sociology 
A. B, Illinois, 1913; M. A., Wisconsin, 1914 
Warren Whittemore Reed 136 College Street 

Assistant Professor of English 

A. B. Harvard, 1907; A. M., 1913 

Herman Pittee Sweetser 32 Cottage Street 

Assistant Professor of Horticulture 

B. S, Maine, 1910 

DeWiTT McClure Taylor 82 Main Street 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

S. B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1906 

Adelbert Wells Sprague 217 Union Street, Bangor 

Director of Music 

B. S., Maine, 1905; A. M., Harvard, 1907 

Harold Joseph Shaw Bath 

County Agricultural Agent, Sagadahoc County 



14 



FACULTY 



Clarence Wallace Barber 255 State Street, Portland 

County Agricultural Agent, Cumberland County 
B. S., Maine, 1912; M. S., 1914 
Clarence Albert Day Machias 

County Agricultural Agent, Washington County 

Arthur Lowell Deering 34 School Street, Augusta 

County Agricultural Agent, Kennebec County 

B. S., Maine, 1912 

, Maurice Daniel Jones 169 Main Street 

County Agricultural Agent, Penobscot County 

B. S., Maine, 1912 

George Albert Yeaton Norway 

County Agricultural Agent, Oxford County 

Albert Kinsman Gardner Farmington 

County Agricultural Agent, Franklin County 

B. S., Maine, 1910 

Harold Harlan Nash San ford 

County Agricultural Agcnt t York County 
George Newton Worden Ellsworth 

County Agricultural Agent, Hancock County 
B. S., Maine, 1913 
Joseph Henry Bodwell Foxcroft 

County Agricultural Agent, Piscataquis County 
B. S., Maine, 1915 
Roger Locke Gowell Warren 

County Agricultural Agent, Knox County 
B. S., Maine, 1916 
Robert Mark Stiles Hartland 

County Agricultural Agent, Somerset County 

William Collins Monahan 40 Forest Avenue 

Extension Instructor in Poultry Work 

B. S., Maine, 1914 

Ralph Pike Mitchell 11 Pond Street 

State Leader Boys' Agricultural Club Work 

Paul Wheeler Monohon 33 Forest Avenue 

Assistant County Agent Leader 

B. S., Maine, 1914 

Catharine Norton Platts University Inn 

Extension Instructor in Home Economics 

S. B., Simmons College, 1911 



15 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

Kathryn Taylor Gordon 13 Pine Street 

Extension Instructor in Home Economics 
S. B., Simmons, 1915 
Mary Isabel Haskell University Inn 

State Leader Girls' Agricultural Club Work 
S. B., Simmons 1910 
Neil Carpenter Sherwood 308 Hannibal Hamlin Hall 

Extension Instructor in Dairying 
B. S., Maine, 1914; M. S., 1916 
Peter Gillespie McKinlay 23 Capital Street, Augusta 

Instructor in Extension Work in Technology 
B. S., Nevada, 1914 



Everett Willard Davee 46 College Street 

Instructor in Wood and Iron Work 
Charles Jenkins Carter 80 Forest Avenue 

Instructor in Machine Tool Work 

Maynie Rose Curtis 33 Mill Street 

Assistant Biologist in the Agricultural Experiment Station 

A. B., Michigan, 1905; A. M., 1908; Ph. D., 1913 

♦Walter Elwood Farnham , 54 Forest Avenue 

Instructor in Drawing 
Ernest Conant Cheswell College Street 

Instructor in Electrical Engineering 
Roydon Lindsay Hammond 109 Main Street 

Seed Analyst and Photographer in the Agricultural Experiment Station 
tDoROTHEA Beach 

Instructor in Home Economics 

John Rice Miner 5 Pond Street 

Computer in the Agricultural Experiment Station 

A. B., University of Michigan, 1913 

Jacob Zinn 306 Hanibal Hamlin Hall 

Assistant Biologist in the Agricultural Experiment Station 
Agr. D., Hochschule fur Bodenkultur, 1914 
Raymond Floyd University Inn 

Instructor in German 

B. A., University of Maine, 1913 



♦On half time leave of absence from September 1, 1916, to September 1, 
1917, as instructor in Extension Work in Technology 

fAbsent on leave, without pay, September 1, 1916, to September 1, 1917 

16 



FACULTY 



Arthur Whiting Leighton University Inn 

Instructor in Brewing 

Sidney Winfield Patterson 2 Forest Avenue 

Instructor in Biological and Agricultural Chemistry 

B. S., Maine 1914; M. S., 1916 

Glen Blaine Ramsey University Inn 

Assistant Plant Pathologist in the Agricultural Experiment Station 

A. B., Indiana, 1913; A. M., 1914 

Harry Gilbert Mitchell 105 Main Street 

Instructor in Chemistry 

B. S., Dartmouth, 1910; A. M., Columbia, 1914 

Roscoe Woods 29 Main Street 

Instructor in Mathematics 

A. B., Georgetown, 1914; A. M., Maine, 1916 

Harry Chamberlain Brown 61 Bennoch Street 

Instructor in Physics 

B. S., Brown, 1913 

Chester Hamlin Goldsmith 32 College Street 

Instructor in Chemistry 
B. S., Maine, 1915 
Helen Ann Knight University Inn 

Instructor in Home Economics 
Ph. B., Chicago, 1915 
Alton Willard Richardson Stillwater Avenue, Old Town 

Instructor in Animal Industry 
B. S., Maine, 1906 
Myer Segal 85 Main Street 

Instructor in German 
A. B., Bates, 1909; A. M., Columbia, 1910 
Thomas William Sheehan 36 Forest Avenue 

Instructor in English 

A. B., Clark, 1909; A. M., Pennsylvania State College, 1915 

J Fred Thomas 33 Forest Avenue 

Instructor in Animal Industry 

B. S., Iowa State College, 1915 

Stanley Ben Sink 42 Forest Avenue 

Instructor in Agronomy 

B. Sc, Ohio State, 1915 

Albert Ames Whitmore University Inn 

Instructor in History 

B. S., Maine, 1906 

17 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Henry Vigor Cranston 106 Hanibal Hamlin Hall 

Instructor in Public Speaking 
B. A., Pennsylvania State, 1915 
Margaret June Kelley 52 Essex Street, Bangor 

Instructor in German 
B. A., Maine 1912; A. M., Maine, 1916 
Richard Theodore Muller 108 No. Main Street 

Instructor in Horticulture 
B. S., Cornell, 1916 
Abraham Strauss University Inn 

Instructor in Botany 
B. Sc., Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1916 
John Leonard Roberts 124 Main Street 

Instructor in Mathematics 

A. B., Bowdoin, 1911 

John Howard Perry Campus 

Assistant Chemist in the Agricultural Experiment Station 

William Raymond Rich 40 Forest Avenue 

Assistant Chemist in the Agricultural Experiment Station 

B. S., Maine, 1916 

Walter Waitstill Webber 108 Hannibal Hamlin Hall 

Assistant Chemist in the Agricultural Experiment Station 
B. S., Maine, 1916 
Ralph Irwin Alexander 7 Forest Avenue 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering 
B. S., Rhode Island, 1913 
Paul Henry Axtell 13 Pine Street 

Instructor in English 
A. B., Colgate, 1916 
Edwin Knight Buttolph 55 Grove St., Bangor 

Instructor in Spanish 
A. B., Hobart, 1881; A. M., 1885 
Raymond von Dersmith Gable 62 High Street, Bangor 

Instructor in Spanish and Italian 

A. B., Johns Hopkins, 1910; A. M., Harvard, 1912 

John Douglass Glancy 10 Mill Street 

Instructor in Pharmacy 
Pharm. D., Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 1913; Ph. C, 1914 
Clyde Thomas Graham 36 College Street 

Instructor in Civil Engineering 

B. Sc, Nebraska, 1911 



18 



FACULTY 



Edward Knevals Hull University Inn 

Instructor in Drawing 
Robert Orland Hutchinson 61 Bcnnoch Street 

Instructor in Physics 

A. B., Indiana, 1914 

William Timothy McCarty 7 Bennoch Street 

Instructor in Physical Culture 

V. S., Ohio State, 1909 

Esther McGinnis University Inn 

Instructor in Home Economics 

B. Sc, Ohio State, 1915 

Marshall Miller 33 Bennoch Street 

Instructor in Chemistry 

B. S., University of Pennsylvania, 1913; Ch. E., 1916 

Anton Adolph Raven, Jr. University Inn 

Instructor in English 

A. B., Rutgers, 1916 

Charles Bunsen Shaw 33 Bennoch Street 

Instructor in English 

A. B., Clark, 1914; A. M., 1915 

Norman Clifford Small 108 Hannibal Hamlin Hall 

Instructor in Civil Engineering 

B. S., Maine, 1916 

Lester Frank Weeks 104 North Main Street 

Instructor in Chemistry 

B. S., Colby, 1915 

Norbert Wiener 55 Bennoch Street 

Instructor in Mathematics 

A. B., Tufts, 1909; Ph. D., Harvard, 1913 

Oscar Milton Wilbur Campus 

Instructor in Animal Industry 

B. S., Maine, 1915 

Percy Barnette Wiltberger 10 Mill Street 

Instructor in Entomology 
B. Sc, Ohio State, 1915 ; M. Sc, 1916 
May Ella Taft 33 Mill Street 

Catalog er in the Library 
B. A., Wellesley, 1908; S. B., Simmons, 1912 
Geneva Alice Reed College Street 

B. A., Maine, 1910 

Assistant in the Library 



19 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Ava Harriet Chadbourne 32 College Street 

Assistant in Education 
B. A., Maine, 1915 
Ethel Gertrude Wigmore 33 Bennoch Street 

Assistant in the Library 

A. B., Acadia, 1914 

Donald Vince Atwater 7 Pleasant Street 

Assistant in Biology 

B. S., Maine, 1916 

Charles Harry White 48 Forest Avenue 

Scientific Aid in the Agricultural Experiment Station 
Ph. C, Maine, 1897 

Walter Edson Curtis Stillwater 

Scientific Aid in the Agricultural Experiment Station 



Lucilius Alonzo Emery Ellsworth 

Lecturer on Roman and Probate Law 

A. B., Bowdoin College, 1861; A. M., 1864; LL. D., 1898 

Louis Carver Southard Boston 

Lecturer on Medico-Legal Relations 

B. S., Maine, 1875 ; M. S., 1892 ; LL. D., 1904 

Edward Harward Blake 107 Court Street, Bangor 

Lecturer on Admiralty 

LL. B., Albany Law School, 1878; LL. D., Maine, 1910 

Isaac Watson Dyer Portland 

Lecturer on Federal Jurisdiction and Procedure, and on Private 

Corporations 
A. B., Bowdoin, 1878 
John Rogers Mason 48 Madison Street, Bangor 

Lecturer in Bankruptcy Law 

A. B., Harvard, 1869; A. M., LL. B., 1872 

William Bridgham Peirce 25 Parkview Avenue, Bangor 

Lecturer on Common Law Pleading and Maine Practice 

B. M. E., Maine, 1890 

Henry Burt Montague Southbridge, Mass. 

Lecturer on Practice and History of Law 

LL. B., Cornell, 1895; LL. M., Maine, 1910 

Lawrence Vivian Jones 267 Pine Street, Bangor 

Lecturer on Forestry Law 

LL. B., Maine, 1910 



20 



FACULTY 



COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

Administration — The President and Deans 

Athletics — Young, Barrows, Gannett, Kaulfuss, L. S. Merrill, Peabody, 
E. H. Sprague 

Chapel — Barrows, Matthews, Stephenson, H. P. Sweetser, Woodman 

Employment — Gannett, Durgin, Simmons, Cranston 

Fitting Schools: — Richardson, Chase, Easley, Hart, L. S. Merrill, 

Pearce, Stephens, Weston 
Graduate Study — Chase, Colvin, Craig, Easley, L. H. Merrill, Morse, 

Pearl, Raggio, Segall, Walz, Willard, Woodman 
Health — Young, Boring, Freeman, Jarrett, Lyon, Russell 
Honors — Chrysler, Briscoe, B. S. Brown, Holmes, Smith, Walz 
Library — R. K. Jones, Colvin, Pearce, Russell, W. J. Sweetser, . G. A. 

Thompson, Willard 
Rules — Stephens, Conser, Drummond, Gannett, Huddilston, Simmons 
Schedule — Weston, Gannett, Hamlin, Reed, the Deans 
Social Affairs — Huddilston, Briscoe, Colvin, Corbett, Farnham, Free- 
man, Kueny 
Student Activities — (Non- Athletic) C. B. Brown, Chairman 

Sub-Committees 
Dramatics — Daggett, C. B. Brown, Kaulfuss 
Musical — A. W. Sprague, G. W. Thompson, Drummond 
Public Speaking — Daggett, Raggio, G. A. Thompson 
Student Publications — Gray, Brooks, Lekberg, McAnney, L. 

H. Merrill 
Miscellaneous — C. B. Brown, Childs, Craig 
University Publications — Stevens, Boardman, R. K. Jones, L. S. Mer- 
rill, Woods 



21 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



HISTORY 

The University of Maine is a part of the public educational system 
of the State. It was established as a result of the Morrill Act approved 
by President Lincoln, July 2, 1862. The State of Maine accepted the 
conditions of this act in 1863. In 1865 the State created a corporation 
to administer the affairs of the college. The original name of the insti- 
tution was the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanical Arts. 
The name was changed to the University of Maine in 1897. 

The first Board of Trustees was composed of 16 members, each 
county delegation in the Legislature selecting one member. Various 
changes have occurred in the appointment of Board members. At the 
present time seven members of the Board are appointed by the Gov- 
ernor of the State, with the advice and consent of the Council, for a term 
of seven years. One member is appointed for three years by the Gov- 
ernor upon the nomination of the Alumni Association. 

The institution opened September 21, 1868, with a class of 12 mem- 
bers and a faculty of two teachers. By 1871 four curricula had been 
arranged, — Agriculture, Civil Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and 
Elective. By gradual growth these curricula developed into the College 
of Agriculture, the College of Technology, and the College of Arts and 
Sciences. 

The Maine Agricultural Experiment Station was established as a 
division of the University by act of the Legislature of 1887, as a re- 
sult of the passage by Congress of the Hatch Act. It succeeded the 
Maine Fertilizer Control and Agricultural Experiment Station which 
had been established in 1885. 

The College of Law was opened in 1898. It is an integral part of 
the institution but occupies quarters at the corner of Union and Second 
streets in Bangor. 



22 



BUILDINGS 



Graduate instruction has been given by various departments for many 
years. The first Master's degree was conferred in 1881. There is no 
provision for graduate work in advance of that required for the Master's 
degrees. 

Beginning with 1902, a Summer Term has been held annually, first 
of five weeks but now of six. It is designed for teachers in secondary 
schools and for college students who desire to take advantage of its 
opportunitines, and it also gives some courses for those who seek an 
opportunity to make up entrance credits. The departments usually offer- 
ing courses are Chemistry, Economics and Sociology, Education, English, 
French, German, History, Latin, Mathematics and Astronomy, Physics, 
and Spanish and Italian. 

The university is coeducational, women having been admitted since 
1872, in compliance with special legal enactment. 

LOCATION 

The university, with the exception of the College of Law and three 
farms, is located in Orono, an attractive town of 3,500 population, with 
good schools and four churches. The campus of 370 acres borders 
the Stillwater River, a branch of the Penobscot, and is of great beauty. 
The College of Law is in Bangor. 

Orono is on the main line of the Maine Central Railroad, eight miles 
east of Bangor, half way between Kittery, the most southerly town in 
the State on the Maine Central Railroad, and Fort Kent, the most north- 
erly town in the State on the Bangor and Aroostook Railroad. It is 
not far from the center of population of the State. In addition to 
steam railroad connection, there is half-hour trolley service to Bangor, 
nine miles, and Old Town, three miles from the campus. Bangor is 
the third city of the State in population and an important business center. 
The location of the university gives students who care to do so an op- 
portunity to take advantage of its social, religious, and other advantages. 
Old Town is a prosperous manufacturing city with about 7,000 inhabi- 
tants. 

BUILDINGS AND THEIR EQUIPMENT 

Balentine Hall. — The Legislature of 1913 made an appropriation 
for the erection of one wing of a women's dormitory. This was com- 
pleted September 1, 1914. The Legislature of 1915 made an appropria- 



23 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



tion for completing the building. The name was given in honor of 
Elizabeth Abbott Balentine, Secretary and Registrar of the University 
from 1895 to 1913. It contains accommodations for 110 women. The 
entire building was ready for occupancy September 1, 1916. 

Hannibal Hamlin Hall. — This is a men's dormitory completed 
in 1911. It contains four stories and a concrete basement. It was named 
for the Honorable Hannibal Hamlin, of Hampden and Bangor, the first 
president of the Board of Trustees. It will accommodate 156 students. 

Mount Vernon House. — This is a wooden building, remodeled in 
1898, and is a dormitory for women. It is a three story building and 
will accommodate 36 students. 

Oak Hall. — This building was named for the Honorable Lyndon 
Oak, of Garland, a long time member and president of the Board of 
Trustees. It is a four story building erected in 1871 and has 48 rooms 
for students. 

University Inn. — This is a wooden building, located in the village 
of Orono, which the University has leased for a term of years. It is 
occupied chiefly by instructors and has accommodations for fifty persons. 



Alumni Hall. — This building was erected in 1900 and was given 
its name because funds required for its erection were subscribed by the 
alumni of the university. It contains the gymnasium, chapel, and ad- 
ministrative offices. 

Aubert Hall. — This is a four story building including a high base- 
ment. It was named in honor of the late Alfred Bellamy Aubert, Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry from 1874 to 1910. It is used by the Departments 
of Chemistry and Physics. 

Coburn Hall. — This building contains the Department of Biology 
and the museum and has recitation rooms for the Departments of His- 
tory and Economics and Sociology. It was named for ex-Governor 
Abner Coburn, of Skowhegan, a former president of the Board of 
Trustees, and the chief individual benefactor of the University. 

Estabrooke Hall. — This building is used for the Departments of 
English and Public Speaking, and was named for the late Horace M. 
Estabrooke, Professor of English from 1891 to 1908. It contains four 
recitation rooms, rooms for consultation purposes, and offices for the 
members of the departments. 



24 



BUILDINGS 



Fernald Hall. — This is the oldest building on the campus and was 
erected for the Department of Chemistry. It now contains the Depart- 
ments of French, Spanish and Italian, Education, Mathematics, and 
the University Store. It was named in honor of ex-President Merritt 
C. Fernald. 

Holmes Hall. — This building contains the offices and laboratories of 
the Maine Agricultural Experiment Station. It is a two story build- 
ing in addition to a basement. It was named for Dr. Ezekiel Holmes, 
of Winthrop. 

Library Building. — The Library Building is of stone, two stories 
above a basement and surmounted by a dome. For its erection and fur- 
nishing, Mr. Andrew Carnegie gave $55,000, and the Hallowell Granite 
Works furnished the granite at a price that was equivalent to a gift 
of several thousand dollars. The stacks, which are in the rear of the 
main building, contain shelf room for 60,000 volumes. 

Lord Hall. — This building was erected for the Departments of 
Electrical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. It is two stories 
in height and contains recitation rooms, laboratories, shops, drawing 
rooms, and offices for the members of these departments. It was named 
for the Honorable Henry Lord, of Bangor, a former President of the 
Board of Trustees. 

Stewart Hall. — This building is situated in Bangor and contains 
offices and recitation rooms of the College of Law. It is three stories 
in height and was named for Honorable D. D. Stewart, of St. Albans, 
Maine, who has been a generous benefactor of this college. 

Wingate Hall. — This building contains three stories and a basement. 
It is used by the Departments of Civil Engineering and Mechanics and 
Drawing, and includes recitation rooms and offices for the Departments 
of Latin and Philosophy. 

Winslow Hall. — This is a four story building including the base- 
ment. It contains offices, laboratories, and recitation rooms for the 
various departments of the College of Agriculture. It was named in 
honor of Honorable Edward B. Winslow, of Portland, a former Presi- 
dent of the Board of Trustees. In the rear of this building is located 
the stock judging pavilion, which is an octagonal structure, having a 
seating capacity of 600. 



Dairy Building. — This building contains various rooms appropriate 
for the Department of Dairy Husbandry. It is supplied with the neces- 



25 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



sary appliances for teaching methods of handling milk, cream, butter, 
and cheese. 

Farm Buildings. — These comprise two large dairy barns, a horse 
barn, a hay storage barn, two tool houses, and a piggery. The farm of 
the university is composed of parcels of land aggregating 473 acres, of 
which 120 acres are under cultivation. 

Horticultural Building. — This includes a set of greenhouses east 
of Holmes Hall and furnishes opportunity for demonstration of the 
practical culture of flowers and vegetables under glass. 

Infirmary. — This building is used in caring for cases of infectious 
diseases that may appear among the students. It is located in the rear 
of Hannibal Hamlin Hall. 

Observatory. — The astronomical observatory stands on a slight ele- 
vation at the east of Alumni Hall. It contains equipment for work 
in descriptive and practical astronomy 

Poultry Plant. — The part of the plant that belongs to the College 
of Agriculture consists of a two and one half story building to which 
are attached brooder houses. The plant which belongs to the Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station contains an incubator house with tenement 
above, two poultry houses, a two story house, a building containing a 
hospital for hens, and rooms for digestion experiments. 



Athletic Field. — Alumni Field, so called because funds required 
for its construction were contributed by the Alumni Association, is 
located at the northern end of the campus. It contains a quarter-mile 
cinder track, with a 220-yard straightaway, and is graded and laid out 
for football, baseball, and track and field athletics. It contains a grand- 
stand with a seating capacity of 2,100. There is also an out-door board 
running track 390 feet long by 12 feet wide. 

Central Heating Plant. — The Central Heating Plant is located on 
low ground so that the buildings drain by gravity to the plant. It con- 
tains four 150 h. p. boilers, two Worthington duplex return pumps, 
and scales for weighing coal. 

Fraternity Houses. — The local chapters of Beta Theta Pi, Delta 
Tau Delta, Kappa Sigma, Phi Gamma Delta, Phi Kappa Sigma, Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon, Theta Chi, Sigma Nu, and Phi Epsilon Pi, and the Phi 



26 



LIBRARIES 



Eta Kappa Society have houses on the campus ; the lo~al chapter of 
Lambda Chi Alpha owns a house adjoining the campus on College Street, 
and the local chapters of Alpha Tau Omega and Sigma Chi own houses 
on North Main Street. These houses accommodate from 25 to 35 
students each. 

Power House. — This building is located north of Alumni Hall and 
contains five boilers, three engines, and two dynamos with operating 
switchboard. 

Print Shop. — The University Press is located in a wooden build- 
ing north of Aubert Hall. It contains a modern outfit for the printing 
required by the university. 

Other Buildings. — In addition to the buildings already described, 
there are several others devoted to various purposes. Among these are 
the President's house and five residences occupied by members of the 
faculty. 

THE LIBRARIES 

The university libraries contain (June 30, 1916) about 59,000 vol- 
umes, of which about 49,500 are in the general library, 4,500 in the Ag- 
ricultural Experiment Station Library, and 5,000 in the law library. In 
addition, there are deposited in the general library, where they are avail- 
able for circulation, over seven hundred volumes from the mathematical 
library of President R. J. Aley, over five hundred volumes, relating chief- 
ly to English literature and philology, from the library of the late Prof- 
essor H. M. Estabrooke, and over a hundred volumes belonging to the 
Christian Association and the Menorah Society. The growth for the 
last ten years has averaged over three thousand volumes annually. 

The general library is a good working collection. It has been ac- 
quired largely by purchase, the books bought having been selected by 
heads of departments to meet the needs of students and faculty. It in- 
cludes a large and useful collection of public documents of the United 
States and of the State of Maine and is a designated depository for gov- 
ernment publications. The most valuable gift received from an individual 
is the horticultural library of the late Professor W. M. Munson, be- 
queathed by him to the university. The general library is open daily 
during the academic year from 8.00 a. m. to 5.30 p. m. and from 7.00 
to 9.30 p. m., Saturday evenings, Sundays, and holidays excepted. It 
is open Sundays from 2.30 to 5.30 p. m., and holidays from 8.00 a. m. to 
12.00 m. 

27 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



About 250 general, literary, scientific, and technical periodicals, 
American and foreign, are subscribed for by the general library and over 
150 others are received as gifts. The current numbers of most of these 
are on file in the periodical room on the first floor of the library building, 
but the daily and weekly newspapers are in a newspaper room in the 
basement, and the technical engineering journals are in the office of the 
Dean of the College of Technology where they are available for general 
use. 

The Agricultural Experiment Station Library, with the excepion of 
volumes needed for almost constant reference by members of the Sta- 
tion staff, is shelved with the general library and is available for con- 
sultation but not for general circulation. It contains many valuable sets 
of scientific journals. About 75 periodicals are subscribed for, and a 
considerable number of others are received in exchange for Station pub- 
lications, current volumes being on file in Holmes Hall. 

The law library occupies rooms in Stewart Hall and is for reference 
only. The former library was burned in the Bangor fire of 1911 and the 
present carefully selected collection has been gathered since that time. 
It includes complete sets of the reports of the United States and of all 
the New England and some other states, the English Reports and English 
Ruling Cases, and all the important reports and encyclopedias, together 
with an excellent collection of text books. The important law journals 
are received currently. The law library is open thruout the academic 
year during the same hours as the general library. 

The libraries are classified D3 r the Dewey decimal system, modified 
for certain classes. A card catalog in the general library shows books 
by author, subject, and title, and includes all volumes in the general, 
Agricultural Experiment Station, and law libraries, and also those in 
the Aley, Estabrooke, Christian Association, and Menorah Society col- 
lection, but does not include cards for the publications of the United 
States Department of Agriculture and the agricultural experiment sta- 
tions of the various states, as these are filed in a special catalog in the 
agriculture seminary. A separate catalog of the law library is main- 
tained in addition in Stewart Hall. 

About nine hundred volumes, withdrawn from the general library, 
are kept in Aubert Hall as a reference library for the Department of 
Physics, subject to recall at any time if needed for other use. Other 
departments borrow books required for current needs, subject to recall 
if needed elsewhere. 



28 



MUSEUM 



Students may borrow three volumes at a time from the general li- 
brary, to be retained three weeks ; if more are desired or if need exists 
to retain them for a longer period, . application should be made to the 
Librarian. A fine of two cents a day is collected for overdue books. 
Reference books do not circulate and special regulations are made for 
books reserved at the request of instructors. Unbound periodicals may 
be borrowed over night upon application to the desk assistant. Mem- 
bers of the faculty may borrow any reasonable number of volumes 
without time limit, but all books must be returned nine days before 
Commencement. Books will be loaned to other libraries, to schools, and 
to residents of the State when it can be done without interference with 
local needs, the borrower paying transportation charges in both directions. 

MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY 

MlNTIN ASBURY CHRYSLER 

Curator of the Botanical and Zoological Collections 

Lucius Herbert Merrill 

Curator of the Geological Collections 

The museum occupies the wing of Coburn Hall and adjoining rooms 
in the main part of the building. 

The part of the museum illustrating the mineral resources of the 
State may be of great value, both from the scientific and economic stand- 
point. Students and others residing in the State are urged to contribute 
specimens from their home localities. 

Zoological Collections. — These collections occupy the lower floor of 
the wing of Coburn Hall. Some of the alcoholic and formalin material 
is placed in wall cases in the biological laboratories. The collections 
consist of a number of the larger mammals of the State ; a small set 
of exotic mammals ; a more complete working collection of native birds, 
birds' nests, and eggs ; an illustrative collection of the other groups of 
vertebrates ; a rather large collection of the shells of native and exotic 
molluscs ; and illustrative collections of the other groups, dry, alcoholic, 
and prepared as microscopic objects. 

Botanical Collections. — These collections are situated in rooms on 
the second and third floors. The herbarium includes several collec- 
tions of considerable value, the most important of which is the one made 



29 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



by the late Rev. Joseph Blake and presented to the university by Mr. 
Jonathan G. Clark, of Bangor. It contains more than 7,000 species of 
both flowering and flowerless plants, and represents more especially the 
flora of Maine and other New England States, but includes many forms 
from the Western United States, Mexico, and the West Indies, and a 
number from many of the European and Asiatic countries, and from Af- 
rica and Australia. The late Professor F. L. Harvey left to the herba- 
rium the general collections accumulated during his connection with the 
university, and his special collection of the weeds and forage plants of 
Maine, comprising 300 species. Other important collections are Collins's 
Algae of the Maine Coast, Halsted's Lichens of New England, Halsted's 
Weeds, Ellis and Everhart's North American Fungi, Cook's Illustrative 
Fungi, Underwood's Hepaticse, Cummings and Seymour's North Ameri- 
can Lichens, and a collection of economic seeds prepared by the United 
States Department of Agriculture. 

Collections other than the herbarium include exhibits illustrating the 
manufacture of paper and cocoa, the wood and bark features of the 
timber trees of Maine, conifers mounted in jars, plants used in phar- 
macy, commercial fibres, and artificial silk. A valuable collection of 
fossil plants was presented by Professor Harvey. 

Geological Collections. — These collections, occupying the upper floor 
of Coburn Hall, are accessible daily during the college year, except on 
Saturdays and Sundays. They include the more important fragmental, 
crystalline, and volcanic rocks ; a collection of building stones ; a series 
designed to illustrate the rocks of the State; a general collection of more 
common minerals; a collection of economic minerals furnished by the 
United States National Museum ; an educational series of rocks fur- 
nished by the United States Geological Survey; and a small collection 
of plant and animal fossils. 

ART COLLECTION 

This collection consists of photographs, prints, engravings, poly* 
chrome reproductions, and plaster casts. Many of the large reproduc- 
tions are framed and the entire collection has found a fitting home in 
the Library Building, the gallery of which is well adapted to the exhibi- 
tion of many of the plaster-cast reliefs and the larger framed works. 
The collection is distributed on the first and second floors, in the lec- 
ture room, and a seminar room. In the latter is a specially constructed 
cabinet for mounted photographs. 



30 



ORGANIZATIONS 



The entire collection numbers upwards of 4,000 reproductions of 
various sorts covering the fields of Classical and Renaissance architec- 
ture, sculpture, and painting. The illustrations for the Greek, Florentine, 
and Venetian schools are particularly representative. For much of the 
most important work the photographs are supplemented by lantern slides. 

The university possesses many of the famous polychrome prints 
published by the Arundel Society. These and many other colored re- 
productions covering nearly all the great masters of Italian painting 
have been framed; and in the case of the Madonna della sedia and the 
Sistine Madonna the reproductions were imported in the frames which 
are stucco copies of the originals in Dresden and Florence. 

The lecture room in the library building contains examples of the 
work of the chief Florentine and Umbrian masters of the 14th and 
15th centuries, arranged on the walls in historical sequence. The gal- 
lery of the second floor is devoted to masters of the High Renaissance. 

For the study of Greek and Roman antiquity the Departments of 
Greek and Latin have a large collection of photographs and lantern slides. 



ORGANIZATIONS 

Agricultural Club. — This organization is composed of students 
taking agricultural courses. Meetings are held thruout the college year, 
at which important agricultural topics are discussed by members of the 
club, and also by prominent speakers from this and other states. 

American Chemical Society. — The Maine Section of the American 
Chemical Society has its headquarters at Orono. Some students in the 
Department of Chemistry are members, and all are welcome to its meet- 
ings. 

American Institute of Electrical Engineering. — This is an or- 
ganization for the promotion of the student's interest in electrical engi- 
neering work, and to keep him in touch with the latest developments in 
this branch of engineering activity. Membership in the branch is ex- 
tended to members of the Electrical Engineering faculty, students pur- 
suing the Electrical Engineering curriculum, and to members and asso- 
ciate members of the Institute. 

American Society of Mechanical Engineers. — A regularly organ- 
ized branch of this society holds regular meetings for the presentation 
and discussion of engineering papers by members and by visiting engi- 
neers. 



31 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



University of Maine Society of Civil Engineering. — This society 
is composed of the students who are enrolled in the Curriculum in Civil 
Engineering. The object of the society is to investigate by reading 
and discussion the various engineering topics of the day. Monthly lec- 
tures are given under the direction of the society by members of the 
faculties of this and other institutions and by practicing engineers. 
The affairs of the society are controlled by the students under the 
advice of the department. 

Cercle Franqais. — The object of the Cercle Frangais is to cultivate 
the spoken French language and arouse and stimulate an interest in the 
intellectual life of France. The work is carried on in French. Papers 
are read and discussed and addresses delivered by the members. Plays 
are studied with a view toward production in French. The Cercle meets 
once in two weeks. 

Deutscher Verein. — This society is composed of teachers and stu- 
dents. Its purpose is to stimulate interest in the various phases of Ger- 
man life and literature and afford practice in speaking German. The 
number of members is limited. Meetings are held every three weeks 
during the academic year. 

Forestry Club. — All students majoring in the curriculum in For- 
estry are eligible for membership in the Forestry Club. The purpose of 
the club is to give an opportunity for presenting informal discussions 
and technical papers on forestry subjects, and to promote cooperation 
and general good fellowship among the forestry students. The meetings 
are held monthly. 

Maine Masque. — This is a dramatic club which aims to make a 
practical study of the acted drama, and to present each year before the 
public one or more representative plays. Membership is determined by 
competitive trials to which all men undergraduates are eligible. 

Menorah Association. — An intercollegiate organization for the study 
and advancement of Jewish culture and ideals. 

Speakers' Club. — A local honorary society, open to all students who 
acquire a sufficiently high standing in public debate and oratory. The 
object of the club is to promote interest in public speaking at the uni- 
versity. It is in active cooperation with the Department of Public Speak- 
ing, and superintends some of the minor activities in oratory and debate. 

Christian Association. — The Christian Association, composed of 
men students, has for its object the promotion of Christian fellowship 
and aggressive Christian work. Religious services are held in the chapel 
every Sunday and classes for the study of the Bible are conducted dur- 
ing the week. 



32 



UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 



Young Women's Christian Association. — This is an organization 
for religious work composed of women students. 



Alpha Chi Sigma. — Alpha Chi Sigma is a professional fraternity 
with chapters in various American colleges and universities. The mem- 
bers are elected from those whose major work is in the Department of 
Chemistry. 

Alpha Zeta. — The Maine chapter of Alpha Zeta, the national agri- 
cultural fraternity, was organized at the university in 1905. Chapters 
exist in twenty four other universities. Membership is honorary and is 
restricted to students attaining high class standing or to graduates who 
have shown marked ability along the lines of agricultural study and 
research. 

Phi Kappa Phi. — The Phi Kappa Phi is an honor society. Early 
in the fall semester of the senior year the seven members of the class 
having the highest standing are elected members, and during the spring 
semester the ten next highest may be elected, two of whom are from 
the College of Law. 

Sigma Delta Chi. — This is an honor fraternity open to sophomores, 
juniors, and seniors who have shown unusual ability in the various cours- 
es in journalism, and who propose to enter upon journalism as a pro- 
fession. 

Tau Beta Pi. — Tau Beta Pi is an honor fraternity for engineers 
and has chapters in leading universities and technical schools. Elections 
are made from those juniors and seniors in engineering who have shown 
high mental and moral qualifications. 

UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

Annual Report. — The report includes an account of the general af- 
fairs and interests of the university for the year. 

University of Maine Studies. — These are occasional publications 
containing reports of investigations or researches made by university 
officers or alumni. 

Maine Bulletin. — This is a publication issued monthly during the 
academic year, to give information to the alumni and the general public. 



33 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Annual Report of the Agricultural Experiment Station and 
the Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletins. — These give com- 
plete results of the work of investigation of the station. The Bulletins 
and Official Inspections are sent free on request to any resident of Maine. 

Official Inspections. — These are published by the Agricultural 
Experiment Station, and contain the result of the work of inspection of 
agricultural seeds, commercial feeding stuffs, commercial fertilizers, 
drugs, foods, fungicides, and insecticides. 

Maine Campus. — This is a journal published weekly during the 
academic year by an association of the students. 

Prism. — The Prism is an illustrated annual, published by the junior 
class. 

Practical Husbandry. — This is a monthly magazine published un- 
der the direction of the Agricultural Club. It is devoted to practical and 
technical agriculture. 

Maine Law Review. — This is a magazine published under the di- 
rection of the students of the College of Law. It is devoted to a dis- 
cussion of law cases and other current legal problems. 

Technology Experiment Station Bulletins. — These are published 
monthly, and contain the results of the researches made in the engineer- 
ing laboratories. 

PUBLIC WORSHIP 

A short assembly is held in the chapel every day except Saturday 
and Sunday. All undergraduate students are required to be present. 
Students receive a cordial welcome at all services in the churches of 
Orono. Voluntary religious services are held each week under the di- 
rection of the Christian Association and the Young Women's Christian 
Association. 

STUDENT REGULATIONS 

It is assumed that all students entering the university are willing to 
subscribe to the following: A student is expected to show both within 
and without the university respect for order, morality, and the rights of 
others, and such sense of personal honor as is demanded of good citi-, 
sens and gentlemen. 



34 



DEGREES 



Special information in regard to rules and regulations may be ob- 
tained from the Registrar. 

The quota of regular studies for each student varies from a mini- 
mum of fourteen hours to a maximum of eighteen hours in the College 
of Arts and Sciences, and from a minimum of seventeen hours to a 
maximum of twenty-two hours in the College of Agriculture and the 
College of Technology. The registration in the College of Law is a 
prescribed curriculum. In the application of this rule, two or three 
hours of laboratory work count as one hour. 

Each student is expected to be present at every college exercise for 
which he is registered, including each chapel exercise. 

SCHOLARSHIP HONORS 

Scholarship honors are awarded to students who attain an average 
grade of B, or above, thruout their course. The names of students 
winning these honors are printed in the catalog. 

DEGREES 

Bachelors' Degrees 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts (B. A.), with specification of the 
major subject, is conferred upon all students who complete a curriculum 
in the College of Arts and Sciences. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science (B. S.) in the curriculum pur- 
sued is conferred upon students who complete the prescribed work of 
four years in the Colleges of Agriculture or Technology. 

The degree of Bachelor of Pedagogy (B. Pd.) is conferred upon 
students in the College of Arts and Sciences who have completed a 
course in an approved high school, a course in a normal school, and two 
years under prescribed conditions at the university. 

The degree of Bachelor of Laws (LL. B.) is conferred upon stu- 
dents who complete the prescribed work in the College of Law. 

The degree of Graduate in Pharmacy (Ph. G.) is conferred upon 
students who complete the two-year Pharmacy Curriculum. 

The entrance requirements for this curriculum are being raised grad- 
ually from two years of high school work and will be a complete high 
school course, by 1919. As soon as proper courses can be provided, a 



35 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



three-year Curriculum in Pharmacy will be established, leading to the 
degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist (Ph. C.) requiring for entrance the 
completion of a four years high school course. 

A minimum residence of one year is required for the attainment of 
any bachelor's degree. 

Advanced Degrees 

Graduate students, whether candidates for a degree or not, are re- 
quired to register at the office of the university at the beginning of each 
semester or summer term. They must have their course of study ap- 
proved by the Committee on Graduate Study at the beginning of their 
work. Those entering the university after that date must obtain the 
consent of the Committee on Graduate Study before they can count a 
full year's work. 

Each candidate for the master's degree shall report before regis- 
tering at the beginning of each semester or the summer term to 
the chairman of the committee or to some member representing a field 
of work nearly related to his own. Candidates for the degree of Mas- 
ter of Arts, Master of Science, or Master of Laws must have received 
the corresponding bachelor's degree from this institution or from one 
granting a fully equivalent degree. 

Candidates who are graduates of other institutions are required to 
present at registration credentials covering the courses pursued and the 
standing attained. 

At least one year must elapse between the conferring of the bache- 
lor's and the master's degree. 

No work done before the recommending of the bachelor's degree 
shall be counted towards the master's degree. 

The candidate shall devote at least one year to graduate resident 
study and shall complete work amounting to fifteen hours per week 
thruout the college year. 

A registration fee of $5 is charged, and an additional fee of $15 
for examinations and diploma is payable upon the completion of the 
work. One registration fee only is required of graduate students. 

The curriculum shall include work in one major department or sub- 
ject in which the candidate has already pursued undergraduate study for 
at least two years, and work in not more than two minor subjects 
which bears a distinct relation to the general plan or purpose of the 
major subject. 



36 



DEGREES 



At least three fifths of the work must be done in the major sub- 
ject. In special cases all the work may be done in one department. 

All of the work must be of advanced character and must be tested 
by examinations which the candidate shall pass with distinction. Final 
written examinations for all regular courses completed, together with 
a copy of the questions set, shall be deposited with the secretary of 
the committee. 

The candidate shall prepare as a part of his curriculum a satisfac- 
tory thesis on some topic connected with the major subject. These must 
be deposited in completed form with the Dean of the University on or 
before the date set for the oral examination. 

At the end of the course of study for the master's degree, the candi- 
date will be required to pass an oral examination covering his work, 
including the thesis work. This examination shall be open to all voting 
members of the faculty of the university. The time for such examina- 
tions will be arranged by the Dean of the University to accord, so 
far as possible, with the convenience of the candidate and the major 
instructor, between the dates of May 15 and June 1 ; but no student 
will be admitted to an oral examination until his thesis has been ac- 
cepted. On May 15, the Dean of the University will notify the heads 
of all departments of the university of the dates set for the public oral 
examinations of all candidates of the year. While the examination 
will in each case, as a matter of course, be conducted chiefly by the 
members of the department in which the work has been done, any mem- 
ber of the faculty present at the examination has the privilege of ques- 
tioning the candidate. The Committee on Graduate Study will be 
represented at each examination. 

The professional degrees of Chemical Engineer (Ch. E.), Civil Engi- 
neer (C. E.), Electrical Engineer (E. E.), and Mechanical Engineer 
(M. E.) may be conferred upon graduates in the curricula in Chemistry, 
Chemical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Mechanical Engi- 
neering respectively, upon the presentation of satisfactory theses, after 
at least three years of professional work subsequent to graduation. 
During at least two of the years after graduation the candidate must 
have occupied a position of responsibility. Candidates are expected to 
be present in person to receive their degrees. 



37 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



THESES 

Theses shall be printed, or typewritten in black record, unless the 
subject matter prevents, and the paper used shall be a standard thesis 
paper, 8 x 10 1-2 inches, which may be procured at the University Store. 
Care should be taken to have a margin of one inch on the inner edge, 
at least one-half inch on the outer edge, one and one-half inches 
at the top, and one inch at the bottom of the page. 

If drawings accompany the thesis, they may be bound in with the 
rest of the pages or placed in a pocket on the inside of the book cover; 
or if too many for this, they may be bound separately according to per- 
sonal instructions of the head of the department. 

An outline of all undergraduate theses must be passed to the major 
instructor before May 1. 

Complete instructions may be found in a pamphlet entitled "Degrees 
and Theses." 

STUDENT EXPENSES 

The estimates are prepared upon the basis of students living in 
university halls. 



Estimate of Annual Expenses 

Students from within 
the State 

Registration $10 00 

Incidential 20 00 

Tuition 30 00 

Laboratory fees 10 00 to 25 00 

Text-books 10 00 to 30 00 

Board 36 weeks @ $3. 50 1 26 00 

Room in a dormitory.. 36 00 to 45 00 



for Men 




Students from without 


the State 




$10 00 




20 00 




100 00 




10 00 to 


$25 00 


10 00 to 


30 00 


126 00 




36 00 to 


45 00 



|242 00 to |286 00 $312 00 to {356 00 

Estimate of Annual Expenses for Women 

The expenses for women are the same as for men, except that the 
annual charge for board and room is uniformly $170.00. 



38 



EXPENSES 



Exceptions 

By legislative enactment, students in agricultural and home economics 
curricula are exempted from the payment of tuition charges. This ap- 
plies only to students from within the State. For such students the above 
estimates should be reduced by an amount equal to the tuition charge. 

Details of Laboratory Fees 

The laboratory charges indicated above are made to cover cost of 
material used by the students. These charges vary with the subject 
and length of the course. They are as follows : Agronomy, per course, 
$1.00 to $1.50; Animal Industry, per course, $1.00 to $4.00; Bacteriology, 
per course, $3.00; Biological Chemistry, per course, $3.00 to $4.00; Biol- 
ogy* per course, $2.00 to $3.00; Chemistry, per course, $2.00 to $5.00; 
Civil Engineering, per course, $2.00 to $5.00; Electrical Engineering, per 
course, $5.00; Home Economics, from $1.00 to $12.00 per semester; 
Horticulture, per course, $1.00 to $2.00; Mechanical Engineering, per 
course, $5.00; Mineralogy, per course, $2.00; Pharmacy, about $5.00 per 
semester; Physics, per course, $2.50 to $3.50; Shop Work, per course, 
$4.00 to $5.00. 

Special Charges 

A fee of $2.00 is charged a student for each special examination. 

Students registering after the prescribed day of registration for the 
fall or spring semester shall pay an additional fee of two dollars. 

A fee of $5.00 is required at the time of registration for a profes- 
sional degree, and a fee of $10.00 is required upon presentation of the 
thesis. 

Rooms 

The rooms in the Mt. Vernon House, Balentine Hall, Oak Hall, 
and the middle section of Hannibal Hamlin Hall accommodate two stu- 
dents each. All other rooms accommodate four students each. 

Dormitory charges include steam heat and electric lights. The rooms 
in the dormitories for men are furnished with beds, mattresses, chif- 
foniers, desks, and chairs. Each resident in the dormitory has bed lin* 
en and three towels laundered each week without extra charge. 



39 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Women students not living at home are required to live in one of 
the women's dormitories. In exceptional cases women students are 
allowed to live at some boarding house approved by the President. To 
secure the reservation of a room in a university dormitory, application, 
acompanied by a deposit of $5.00, should be made on or before Septem- 
ber 1. 

Deposits to Cover Expenses 

STUDENTS FROM WITHIN THE STATE 



# 






d 

°b 

O CO QJ 



Students in Agriculture 

Students in HomeEconomics 
Students in College of Law 
Students in all other courses 



$5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 



20.00 
15.00 



$10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 



$75.00 
75.00 



$5.00 
5.00 



$5.00 
5.00 



75.00 



5.00 



5.00 



$100.00 

100.00 

35.00 

115.00 



STUDENTS 


FROM 


WITHOUT THE STATE 








| 
I 

m 

"3 
8 
« 


| 
'5 


Is 

a 

9 

3? 

'o 
Sj 


§ 

CO 

1 


gi"S 

< S a 

O c0 <U 


i 

P 


i 


Students in Agriculture 

Students in HomeEconomics 
Students in College of Law 
Students in all other courses 


$5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 


$50.00 
50.00 
50.00 
50.00 


$10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 


$75.00 


$5.00 
5.00 


$5.00 
5.00 


$150.00 

150.00 

65.00 


75.00 


5.00 


5.00 


150.00 



For a student not living in a university dormitory the above deposits 
are reduced by $80.00. 

Students in the College of Law, which is located in Bangor, do not 
live in university dormitories, therefore no deposit is required to apply on 
board and room. Board and furnished rooms, with light and heat, may 
be obtained at prices ranging from $5.00 to $7.00 a week. 

Communications 

Communications with reference to financial affairs of students should 
be addressed to the Treasurer of the University of Maine. 



40 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES 



Blanket Tax 



Students generally contribute $10.00 annually to the support of 
athletics and the Maine Campus. This is not a university requirement, 
but is wholly voluntary. 

KITTRIDGE LOAN FUND 

This fund, amounting to nearly one thousand dollars, was estab- 
lished by Nehemiah Kittridge, of Bangor. It is in the control of the 
President and the Treasurer of the University, by whom it is loaned to 
needy students in the three upper classes. In the deed of gift it was 
prescribed that no security but personal notes bearing interest at the 
prevailing rate should be required. Loans are made on the conditions 
that the interest be paid promptly, and that the principal be returned 
from the first earnings after graduation. Individual loans are limited 
to $50.00. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES 

The Kidder Scholarship, thirty dollars, was endowed by Frank E. 
Kidder, Ph. D., Denver, Colorado, a graduate of the university of 
the class of 1879, and is awarded to a member of the junior class to be 
selected by the President and the faculty. 

New York Alumni Association Scholarship, thirty dollars, is 
awarded upon conditions to be determined by the Board of Trustees. 
It has for some years been awarded to the student who excelled in de- 
bate. 

Pittsburg Alumni Association Scholarship, tuition for one year, 
is awarded to a member of the junior class in the College of Technology, 
to be selected by the President and the professors of that college. 

Western Alumni Association Scholarship, tuition for the sopho- 
more year, is awarded a student pursuing a regular curriculum whose 
deportment is satisfactory and who makes good progress in his studies 
during his freshman year. 

The Elizabeth Abbott Balentine Scholarship was endowed by 
the Gamma chapter of Alpha Omicron Pi for a woman member of the 
sophomore class to be determined by the President and the faculty. 
This scholarship will be at least thirty dollars. Both scholarship and 
individual need are to be considered in the award. 



41 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

Junior Exhibition Prizes of fifteen dollars each are awarded to 
the members of the junior class who deliver the best orations at the 
junior exhibition. One prize is awarded to the man receiving the 
first rank in competition with the men of the junior class, and one 
prize awarded to the woman receiving first rank in competition with 
the women of the junior class. In the award of these prizes regard 
is given to thought, style, and delivery. Copies of these orations must 
be deposited with the Registrar before February 1. 

Sophomore Essay Prizes, two of fifteen dollars each, one for men 
and one for women, are awarded to members of the sophomore class 
for excellence in composition. These essays must be presented by May 1. 

Clarence P. King Prize, twenty-five dollars, the gift of Mr. Clar- 
ence P. King, of Washington, D. C, is awarded to that member of the 
senior and junior classes who delivers the best original oration. 

Walter Balentine Prize, fifteen dollars, the gift of Whitman H. 
Jordan, Sc. D., LL. D., Geneva, N. Y., a graduate of the university of 
the class of 1875, is awarded to that member of the senior class who 
excels in biological chemistry. 

Kennebec County Prize, twenty-five dollars, the gift of the Hon. 

William T. Haines, LL. D., Waterville, a graduate of the university of 

the class of 1876, is awarded to that member of the junior class who 
writes the best thesis on applied electricity. 

Franklin Danforth Prize, ten dollars, the gift of the Hon. Ed- 
ward F. Danforth, Skowhegan, a graduate of the university of the class 
of 1877, in memory of his father, Franklin Danforth, is awarded to 
that member of the senior class in an agricultural curriculum who at- 
tains the highest standing. 

Father Harrington Prize, twenty dollars, established by Rev. John 
M. Harrington, pastor of St. Mary's Church, Orono, is given to that 
student who writes the best essay upon modern literature. It may treat 
of German, English, French, Spanish, or Italian literature. The essay 
may be limited to any one of these literatures or to a comparative study 
of any number of them. This is open to any student in the university. 

These essays must be deposited with the Registrar before May 1. 

Pharmacy Prize, five dollars, is awarded to that student in the 
Pharmacy Department who attains the highest standing in chemistry 
in the last year of his course. 



42 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES 



Holt Prizes, the gift of Dr. Erastus Eugene Holt, of Portland, are 
given to the three students of the senior class who show the greatest 
improvement in their physical rating. The rating will be determined 
from deductions made from the gymnasium and class records of the 
students at the beginning and end of their college course by the mathe- 
matical formula for the normal earning ability of the body devised by 
Dr. Holt. 

American Pharmaceutical Association Prize, membership for 
one year in the association, is awarded by the faculty to the member of 
the senior class in Pharmacy who has made the best record in his col- 
lege course. 

The American Law Book Company Prize, consisting of a com- 
plete set of "Cyc" with annual annotations to date, is given to the stu- 
dent in the College of Law who shall take the highest scholarship honor 
for the period of his senior year. The method of award is left to the 
faculty of the College of Law. 

The Callaghan and Company Prize, consisting of the Cyclopedic 
Law Dictionary, is given to the student in the College of Law who has 
obtained the highest general average for his junior year. 

The Malcolm Fassett State-Centennial Prize, $50.00, the gift 
of Malcolm E. Fassett of the class of 1910, will be awarded to the stu- 
dent who writes the best one-act play dealing with typical or historical 
life and character in the State of Maine. The play should be in one 
act, preferably in one scene, and should require from thirty to forty- 
five minutes in presentation. In order to have the prize play available 
for production in 1920, all manuscripts will be due March 15, 1919. The 
contest will be under the direction of the council of the Maine Masque, 
subject to the approval of the President of the University. Plays may 
be submitted by any undergraduate student who is in regular standing 
at the university on March 15, 1919. 

Class of 1908 Commencement Cup is awarded to the fraternity, the 
largest percentage of whose alumni register during Commencement week. 

Fraternity Scholarship Cup, presented to the university by the 
1910 Senior Skull Society, is awarded at Commencement to that frater- 
nity having the highest standing in scholarship for the preceding cal- 
endar year. The cup is to be awarded for eleven years, 1910 to 1920 in- 
clusive, and the fraternity to which it is awarded the greatest number 
of times is to be its permanent owner. 



43 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Freshman Scholarship Cup, presented by the Junior Mask Society, 
is awarded at Commencement to the fraternity whose freshman dele- 
gation has the highest standing in scholarship for the first semester. 

ADMISSION 

General Requirements. — Candidates for admission should apply 
to the Registrar for an application card. They must present satisfac- 
tory certificates of fitness, or pass the required examinations, and make 
a cash deposit covering the bills of one semester. The university ad- 
mits men and women, both residents of Maine and non-residents. 

Admission to Advanced Standing. — Candidates for advanced stand- 
ing are examined in the preparatory studies, and in those previously pur- 
sued by the classes they wish to enter, or in other equivalent studies. 
A rank of B must be attained in order to pass any course without class 
attendance. Certificates from approved schools are accepted for the 
preparatory work, but certificates are not accepted for any part of the 
college work, unless such work has been done in a college. Students 
transferring from another college must present a letter of honorable 
dismission. 

Special Students. — Persons 21 years of age, not candidates for a 
degree, may be admitted as special students if they give satisfactory evi- 
dence that they are prepared to take the desired subjects. 

Admission to Short Courses 

Candidates for the two-year Curriculum in Pharmacy must be at 
least seventeen years of age, and must have successfully completed at 
least three years in an approved high school. Such candidates must offer 
four years of high school work in the fall of 1919 and thereafter. 

Candidates for the three-year Curriculum in Pharmacy must be 
graduates of a recognized high school or its equivalent and must have 
succesfully completed the two-year Curriculum in Pharmacy or its 
equivalent. 

Candidates for admission to the two-year School Course in Agri- 
culture must be over fifteen years of age and prepared for advanced 
grammar or high school work. 

Admission by Examinations 

Entrance examinations are held at Orono, beginning four days be- 
fore the opening of the fall semester, and on the Wednesday, Thursday, 



44 



ADMISSION 



Friday, and Saturday preceding Commencement. To save expense to 
candidates, examination papers will be sent to any satisfactory person 
who will consent to conduct examinations on the days appointed in June. 
If possible, these examinations should be in charge of the principal of 
the school. Papers will not be sent at any other, time. The questions 
are to be submitted under the usual restrictions of a written examination, 
and the answers returned to the university immediately, accompanied by 
the endorsement of the examiner. The examination must be given on 
the days appointed in the schedule. Applications for such examinations 
must be made out on blanks to be obtained from the Registrar. Candi- 
dates for admission by examination, particularly those examined at 
Orono in September, should present statements from their school prin- 
cipals regarding their fitness to take the examinations and to undertake 
college work. 

The examinations given by the College Entrance Examination Board 
will be accepted by the university. These examinations will be held 
during the week June 17-22, 1917. All applications for these examina- 
tions must be addressed to the Secretary of the College Entrance Exami- 
nation Board, Post Office Sub-Station 84, New York, N. Y., and must 
be made upon a blank form to be obtained from the Secretary of the 
Board upon application. 

A candidate wh3 wishes to be examined on part of his work in 
advance of the year in which he proposes to enter the university may 
receive credit for such examination, provided he has completed not less 
than one-half of his preparatory work. It is advised that candidates 
avail themselves of this privilege as far as possible. Examinations on 
subjects which are to be continued in college should not be taken more 
than one year in advance. 

Admission of Graduates From Class A Schools in Maine 

Graduates from Maine high schools and academies placed by the 
State Superintendent of Schools in Class A may be admitted upon their 
school records, provided they have pursued a course of study including 
all the subjects required for admission to the curriculum that they pro- 
pose to follow and a sufficient number of the elective subjects to make 
a total of fourteen and a half units. 

The school record of the candidate must be certified by the principal, 
upon blanks furnished by the university, and should be submitted be- 
fore August 1. 

45 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Admission by Certificate From Schools Outside of Maine 

Principals of schools situated outside of Maine who desire the cer- 
tificate privilege must make application to the Dean of the University, 
and must furnish satisfactory evidence that the course of study in the 
school meets the requirements for admission. Blank forms for this 
purpose will be supplied on request. 

Certificates will not be accepted for non-graduates except in un- 
usual cases, and then only provided the candidate is expressly recom- 
mended for admission by the principal of the high school from which 
he comes. Certificates must be made out on blanks furnished by the 
university. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

To gain admission to any of the curricula leading to the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science, \4 l /> units must be offered 
by the candidate, according to the following schedules (to count one] 
unit, a subject must be pursued for one school year, with five recitation 
periods a week) : 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Required Subjects 

Foreign languages 4 units 

English 3 " 

History 1 unit 

Mathematics 2^units 

103^ units 

Not less than two units of any foreign language may be offered. 
Credit for advanced work will be accepted at the rate of one unit for 
each year of work. 



46 



ADMISSION 



Optional Subjects (4 units to be chosen) 

Greek 2 or 3 units 

Latin 2, 3, or 4 

French 2, 3, or 4 

German 2, 3, or 4 ' ' 

Spanish 2, 3, or 4 

Advanced algebra \i unit 

Solid geometry • % ' ' 

Trigonometry 

Chemistry (including note-book ) 

Phisics (including note-book) 

Physiography (one half or one year) % unit or 

Biology (including note-book) 

Botany (including note-book) 

Zoology (includiug note-book) 

Physiology 

Ancient History (1 year) 

English History (1 year) 

American History and civil government (1 year) 

Medieval and modern history 

Colleges of Agriculture and Technology 

Required Subjects 

English 3 units 

*Algebra V/ 2 " 

Plane geometry 1 unit 

Solid geometry (College of Technology except Pharmacy) % " 

Foreign language (two years of one language) 2 units 

Science 1 unit 

History 1 ' ' 

9 % or 10 units 



^Candidates who have had two full years of algebra, including a 
review during the last year, and the use of an advanced text-book, may 
receive credit of two units. Such a course is recommended for those 
who wish to pursue a curriculum in engineering or chemistry. 



47 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Optional Subjects (4 1-2 or 5 units to be chosen) 

Each year of French 1 unit 

" * * << German 1 

" " " Spanish 1 

" " " Latin 1 

" " Greek 1 

Advanced Algebra y 

Trigonometry y 

tMechanical Drawing y, 

tManual training y 

Chemistry (including note-book) 1 

Physics (including note-book) 1 

Physiography (one-half year or one year y, unit or 1 

Biology ( including note-book ) 1 

Botany (including note-book) 1 

Zoology (including note-book ) 1 

Physiology y, 

Roman History y 2 

Greek history y 

English history y or 1 

Candidates for admission to any curriculum, who are well prepared in 
all the required subjects, but whose high school course has included 
studies other than the electives mentioned above, will be allowed to sub- 
stitute such as will furnish a real equivalent. Each case of proposed sub- 
stitution will be considered upon its merits. 

Credits for industrial and commercial subjects may be given at the dis- 
cretion of the committee on admission. The total credit for these sub- 
jects will be limited to two units for admission to the College of Arts 
and Sciences, and to four units for the Colleges of Agriculture and 
Technology. 

The requirement in history will be satisfied by a year of Greek and 
Roman history, or a year of English history, or a year of medieval and 



fGraduates from high schools giving a full manual training course 
may receive credit for mechanical drawing, manual training, and free- 
hand drawing, on the basis of one-half unit for five forty-five minute 
periods per week for one year in one subject taken in the high school. 



48 



ADMISSION 



modern history, or a year of American history and civil government. 

A choice will be allowed between the last half year of algebra and solid 
geometry for those who do not expect to continue mathematics in college. 

College of Law 

Regular Students. Students who enter as candidates for degrees must 
present credentials showing the completion of at least two full years of 
work in an approved college or university. An approved college or uni- 
versity will be understood to mean a college or university which requires 
at least 14 Carnegie units for entrance, which offers facilities for good 
college work, and which maintains acceptable standards. 

Special Students. Special students will be admitted only when they sat- 
isfy the following requirements : They must be at least 21 years of age ; 
they must appear personally before a committee consisting of the Presi- 
dent of the University and the Deans of the Colleges, and satisfy this 
committee that they have the maturity and mental training that will qual- 
ify them to do acceptably the work required of regular students. 



REQUIREMENTS IN DETAIL 
Languages 

English. — The entrance examination in English presupposes courses 
in composition and English literature pursued in the high school during 
four years. Prospective students are warned against attempting to pre- 
pare the required work in less time. Progress in composition particu- 
larly is of slow growth and requires almost daily cultivation during a 
long period of time. Books, to be thoroly enjoyed and appreciated, 
should be read leisurely and under favorable circumstances. 

Rhetoric. — Candidates are expected to have had practice in composi- 
tion for at least three days a week during the whole four years of the 
high school, and to have included in the latter part of their course such 
work in the elements of rhetoric as, for example, is contained in Car- 
penter's Rhetoric and Composition. 



49 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Grammar. — The examination will include questions on the syntax of 
sentences, and on general grammatical principles. 

Weight of Composition. — The examination is mainly designed to test 
the candidate's ability to express his thought correctly and clearly. It 
is quite possible to answer all questions on the literature correctly, and 
yet fail on the examination as a whole because of crude and ungram- 
matical English. Prospective candidates are advised to give especial 
attention to spelling, punctuation, grammatical correctness, idiomatic 
words and phrases, sentence and paragraph formation. 

Subjects. — Subjects for short compositions will be taken from 
the A list of books; also from the candidate's general knowledge and 
experience. 

The prescribed books are those adopted by the Conference on Uni- 
form Entrance Requirements. The A list is for general reading; the 
B list is for study. The candidate is not expected to have a detailed 
knowledge of these books, but such acquaintance with them as naturally 
follows intelligent and appreciative reading. Two books are to be 
selected from each group. 

Books in the A List 

Group I 

(For any unit of this group a unit from any other group may be 
substituted) Old Testament — Comprising the chief narrative episodes 
in Genesis, Exodus, Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings, and Daniel, together 
with the books of Ruth and Esther. Homer — The Odyssey, (English 
translation) with the omission, if desired, of Books I, II, III, IV, V, 
XV, XVI, XVII; The Iliad, (English translation) with the omission, if 
desired, of Books XI, XIII, XIV, XV, XVII, XXI. Vergil— yEneid 
(English translation). 

Group II 
Shakespeare — Merchant of Venice, Midsummer-Night's Dream, As 
You Like It, Twelfth Night, King Henry V, Julius Caesar. 

Group III 

Defoe — Robinson Crusoe, Part I. Goldsmith — The Vicar of Wake- 
field. Scott — Ivanhoe or Quentin Durward. Hawthorne — The House of 
the Seven Gables. Dickens — David Copperfield or A Tale of Two Cities. 



50 



ADMISSION 



Thackeray — Henry Esmond. Gaskell — Cranford. Eliot — Silas Marner. 
Stevenson — Treasure Island. 

Group IV 

Bunyan — Pilgrim's Progress, Part I. Addison, Steele, and Budgell— 
The Sir Roger de Coverley Papers in "The Spectator." Franklin — Auto- 
biography. Irving — Sketch-Book. Macaulay — Essays on Lord Clive and 
Warren Hastings. Thackeray — English Humorists. Lincoln — Selections 
from, including the two Inaugurals, the speeches in Independence Hall 
and at Gettysburg, the Last Public Address, and letter to Horace 
Greeley, along with a brief memoir or estimate. Parkman — The Oregon 
Trail. Thoreau — Walden. Huxley — Autobiography and Selections from 
Lay Sermons, including the Addresses on Improving Natural Knowledge, 
A Liberal Education, and A Piece of Chalk. Stevenson — An Inland 
Voyage, and Travels with a Donkey. 

Group V 

Palgrave — Golden Treasury (First Series), Books II and III, with 
especial attention to Dryden, Collins, Gray, Cowper, and Burns. Gray — 
An Elegy in a Country Churchyard, and Goldsmith — The Deserted Vil- 
lage, combined. Coleridge — The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, and 
Lowell — The Vision of Sir Launfal, combined. Scott — The Lady of the 
Lake. Byron — Childe Harold, Canto IV, and the Prisoner of Chillon. 
Palgrave — Golden Treasury (First Series), Book IV, with especial at- 
tention to Wordsworth, Keats, and Shelley. Poe — The Raven; Long- 
fellow — The Courtship of Miles Standish, and Whittier — Snow Bound, 
combined. Macaulay — Lays of Ancient Rome, and Arnold — Sohrab and 
Rustum, combined. Tennyson — Gareth and Lynette, Lancelot and Elaine, 
and the passing of Arthur. Browning — Cavalier Tunes, The Lost 
Leader, How They Brought the Good News from Ghent to Aix, Home 
Thoughts from Abroad, Home Thoughts from the Sea, Incident of the 
French Camp, Herve Riel, Pheidippides, My Last Duchess, Up at a 
Villa, Down in the City. 

Books in the B List 

Shakespeare's Macbeth, Milton's Comus, L'Allegro, and II Penseroso. 
Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America, or Washington's Farewell 



51 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Address, and Webster's First Bunker Hill Oration. Macaulay's Life of 
Johnson, or Carlyle's Essay on Burns. 

French. — The admission requirements in elementary and intermediate 
French are those recommended by the Modern Language Association 
of America. 

I. Elementary French. — At the end of the second year the pupil 
should be able to pronounce French accurately, to read at sight easy 
French prose, to put into French simple English sentences taken from 
the language of everyday life or based upon a portion of the French 
text read, and to answer questions on the rudiments of the grammar as 
defined below. 

The first year's work should comprise: (1) careful drill in pronun- 
ciation; (2) the rudiments of grammar, including the inflection of the 
regular and the more common irregular verbs, the plural of nouns, the 
pronouns, common adverbs, prepositions, and conjunctions; order of 
words in the sentences, and elemental rules of syntax ; (3) abundant 
easy exercises, designed not only to fix in memory the forms and prin- 
ciples of grammar, but also to cultivate readiness in reproducing natural 
forms of expression; (4) the reading of 100 to 175 duodecimo pages of 
graduated texts, with constant practice in translating into French easy 
variation of the sentences read (the teacher giving the English), and 
in reproducing from memory sentences previously read; (5) writing 
French from dictation. 

The second year's work should comprise: (1) the reading of 250 to 
400 pages of easy modern prose in the form of stories, plays, or histor- 
ical or biographical sketches ; (2) constant practice, as in the previous 
year, in translating into French easy variations upon the texts read; (3) 
frequent abstracts, sometimes oral and sometimes written, of portions of 
the text already read; (4) writing French from dictation; (5) con- 
tinued drill upon the rudiments of grammar, with constant application 
in the construction of sentences ; (6) mastery of the forms and use of 
pronouns, pronominal adjectives, of all but the rare irregular verb 
forms, and of the simpler uses of the conditional and subjective. 

Suitable texts for the second year are : About, le Rot des montagnes ; 
Bruno, le Tour de la France; Daudet, Easier Short Tales; De la 
Bedolliere, La Mire Michel et son chat; Erckmann-Chatrian's Stories; 
Foa, Contes biographiques and le Petit Robinson de Paris; Foncin, le 
Pays de France; Labiche and Martin, la Poudre aux yeux and le Voy- 



52 



ADMISSION 



age de M. Perrichon; Legouve and Labiche, la Cigale chez les fourmis; 
Malot, sans Famille; Mairet, la Tache du petit Pierre; Merimee, 
Colomba; Extracts from Michelet; Sarcey, le Siege de Paris; Verne's 
Stories. 

II. Intermediate French. — At the end of the third year the pupil 
should be able to read at sight ordinary French prose or simple poetry, 
to translate into French a connected passage of English based on the 
text read, and to answer questions involving a more thoro knowledge 
of syntax than is expected in the elementary course. 

This should comprise the reading of 400 to 600 pages of French of 
ordinary difficulty, a portion to be the dramatic form; constant prac- 
tice in giving French paraphrases, abstracts, or reproductions from mem- 
ory of selected portions of the matter read; the study of a grammar of 
moderate proportions ; writing from dictation. 

Suitable texts are: About Stories; Augier and Sandeau, le Gendre 
de M. Poirier; Berauger's Poems ; Corneille, le Cid and Horace; Cop- 
pee's Poems ; Daudet, la Belle Nivernaise ; La Brete, Mon oncle et mon 
cure; Madame de Sevigne's Letters ; Hugo, Hernani and la Chute; 
cure; Madame de Sevigne's Leters ; Hugo, Hernani and la Chute; 
Labiche's Plays; Loti, Pecheur d'Islande; Mignet's Historical Writings, 
Andromaque, and Esther; George Sand's Plays and Stories ; Sandeau, 
Mademoiselle de la Seigliere; Scribe's Plays; Thierry, Recits; Vigny, 
la Canne de jonc; Voltaire's Historical Writings. 

At the end of the fourth year the pupils should be able to read at 
sight, with the help of a vocabulary of special or technical expressions, 
difficult French not earlier than that of the seventeenth century; to write 
in French a short essay on some simple subject connected with the 
works read ; to put into French a passage of easy English prose, and to 
carry on a simple conversation in French. 

This should comprise the reading of from 600 to 1,000 pages of stand- 
ard French, classical and modern, only difficult passages being explained 
in the class ; the writing of numerous short themes in French ; the 
study of syntax. 

Suitable leading matter will be: Beaumarchais's Barbier de Seville; 
Corneille's Dramas ; the elder Dumas's Prose Writings ; the younger 
Dumas's la Question d'argent; Hugo, Ruy Bias, Lyrics, and Prose 
Writings; La Fontaine's Fables; Larmartine, Graziella; Marivaux's 
Plays ; Moliere's Plays ; Musset's Plays and Poems ; Pellissier, Mouve- 



53 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



ment litteraire au XIX siecle; Renan, Souvenirs d'enfance W de 
jeunesse; Rousseau's Writings ; Sainte-Beuve's Essays ; Selections from 
Zola, Maupassant, and Balzac. 

The examination of the College Entrance Certificate Board in ele- 
mentary French will be accepted for two units, and that in intermediate 
French for two additional units. 

German. — The admission requirements in elementary and advanced 
German are those recommended by the Modern Language Association 
of America. 

/. Elementary German. — The first year's work should comprise: (1) 
careful drill upon pronunciation ; (2) memorizing and frequent repeti- 
tion of easy colloquial sentences; (3) drill upon the rudiments of gram- 
mar; that is, upon the inflection of the articles, of such nouns as belong 
to the language of every-day life, of adjectives, pronouns, weak verbs, 
and the more unusual strong verbs ; also in the use of the more common 
prepositions, the simpler uses of the modal auxiliaries, and the elemen- 
tary rules of syntax and word order; (4) abundant easy exercises 
designed not only to fix in mind the forms and principles of grammar 
but also to cultivate readiness in reproducing natural forms of expres- 
sion ; (5) the reading of 75 to 100 pages of graduated texts from a 
reader, with constant practice in translating into German easy varia- 
tions upon sentences selected from the reading lesson (the teacher 
giving the English), and in reproducing from memory sentences pre- 
viously read. 

The second year's work should comprise: (1) the reading of 150 to 
200 pages of literature in the form of easy stories and plays ; (2) ac- 
companying practice, as before, in translating into German easy varia- 
tions upon the matter read, also in the off-hand reproductions, some- 
times orally and sometimes in writing, of the substance of short and easy 
selected passages ; (3) continued drill in the rudiments of grammar, to 
enable the pupil first, to use his knowledge with facility in forming sen- 
tences, and secondly, to state his knowledge correctly in the technical lan- 
guage of grammar. 

Stories suitable for the elementary course can be selected from the 
following list : Anderson, Mdrchen and Bilderbuch ohne Bilder; Baum- 
bach, Die Nonna and Der Schwiegersohn; Gerstacker, Germelshausen; 
Heyse, UArrabbiata, Das Mddchen von Treppi, and Anfang und Ende; 
Hillern, Hoher als dei Kirche ; Jensen, Die braune Erica; Leander, 



54 



ADMISSION 



Troutnercien and Kleine Geschichten; Seidel, Mdrchen; Stokl, Unter 
dem Christbaum; Storm, Immcnsee and Geschichten aus der Tonne; 
Zschokke, Der zcrbrochene Krug. 

The best shorter plays available are : Benedix, Der Prozess, Der 
IVeiberfeind, and Gunstige Vorzeichen; Elz, Er ist nicht eifersuchtig; 
Wichert, An der Majorsecke ; Wilhelmi, Einer muss heir at en. Only 
one of these plays need be read, and the narrative style should pre- 
dominate. A good selection of reading matter for the second year 
would be Anderson, M'drchen or Bilderbuch, or Leander, Trdumcrcien, 
to the extent of about forty pages. Afterward, such a story as Das 
kalte Herz, or Der zerbrochene Krug; then Holier als die Kirche, orj 
Immense e ; next a good story by Heyse, Baumbach, or Seidel; last Der 
Prozess. 

II. Advanced German. — The work should comprise, in addition to 
the elementary course, the reading of about 400 pages of moderately 
difficult prose and poetry, with constant practice in giving, sometimes 
orally and sometimes in writing, paraphrases, abstracts, or reproductions 
from memory of selected portions of the matter read; also grammatical 
drill in the less usual strong verbs, the use of articles, cases, auxiliaries 
of all kinds, tenses and modes (with especial reference to the infinitive 
and subjunctive), and likewise in word order and word formation. To 
do this work two school years are usually required. 

Suitable reading matter for the third year may be selected from such 
work as the following: Ebner-Eschenbach, Die Freiherren von Gem- 
perlein; Freytag, Die J ournalisten and Bilder aus der deutchen Ver- 
gangenheit, Karl der Grosse, Aus den Kreuzzugen, Doktor Luther* 
Aus dem Staat Friedrichs des Grossen; Fouqee, Undine; Gerstacker, 
Irrfahrten; Goethe, Hermann und Dorothea and Iphigenie; Heine's 
Poems and Reisebilder; Hoffman, Historische Erzdhlungen; Lessing 
Minna von Barnhelm; Meyer, Gustav Adolf s Page; Moser, Der Biblio- 
thekar; Riehl, Novellen, Burg Neideck, Der Fluch der Schonheit, Der 
Stumme Ratsherr, Das Spielmannskind; Rosegger, Waldheimat; Schil- 
ler,Der Neffe als Onkel, Der Geisterseher, Wilhelm Tell, Die Jungfrau 
von Orleans, Das Lied von der Glocke, Balladen; Scheffel, Der Trom- 
peter von Sdkkingen; Uhland's Poems ; Wildenbruch, Das edle Blut. A 
good selection would be: (1) one of Riehl's novelettes; (2) one of 
Freytag's "pictures ;" (3) part of Undine or Der Geisterseher; (4) a 
short course of reading in lyrics and ballads ; (5) a classical play by 
Schiller, Lessing, or Goethe. 



55 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



The examinations of the College Entrance Certificate Board in ele- 
mentary German will be accepted for two units, and that in advanced 
German for one additional unit. 

Spanish. — The admission requirements in Spanish are those of the 
College Entrance Examination Board. 

Elementary Spanish. — At the end of the second year of the ele- 
mentary course the pupil should be able to pronounce Spanish accu- 
rately, to read at sight easy Spanish prose, to put into Spanish simple 
English sentences taken from the language of everyday life or based 
upon a portion of the Spanish text read, and to answer questions on 
the rudiments of the grammar, as indicated below. 

The first year's work should comprise: (1) Careful drill in pronun- 
ciation; (2) the rudiments of grammar, including the conjugation of 
the regular and the more common irregular verbs, the inflection of 
nouns, adjectives, and pronouns, and the elementary rules of syntax; 

(3) exercises containing illustrations of the principles of grammar; 

(4) the careful reading and accurate rendering into good English of 
about 100 pages of easy prose and verse, with translation into Spanish 
of easy variations of the sentences read; (5) writing Spanish from 
dictation. 

The second year's work should comprise: (1) The reading of about 
200 pages of prose and verse; (2) practice in translating Spanish into 
English, and English variations of the text into Spanish; (3) con- 
tinued study of the elements of grammar and syntax; (4) mastery 
of all but the rare irregular verb forms and of the simpler uses of the 
modes and the tenses; (5) writing Spanish from dictation; (6) memo- 
rizing of easy short poems. 

The emphasis should be placed on careful thoro work with much 
repetition rather than upon rapid reading. The reading should be select- 
ed from the following: A collection of easy short stories and lyrics, 
carefully graded; Juan Valera, El pdjaro verde ; Perez Escrich, Fortuna; 
Ramos Carrion and Vital Aza, Zaragiieta; Palacio Valdes, Jose; Pedro 
de Alarcon, El Capitdn Veneno; the selected short stories of Pedro de 
Alarcon or Antonio de Trueba. 

Latin. — The entrance examination in Latin will consist of four parts, 
as follows : 

1. An examination on the elements of Latin grammar and easy trans- 
lations. 



56 



ADMISSION 



2a. An examination in sight translation of Latin prose suited to test 
the ability of a candidate who has read from Caesar (Gallic War and 
Civil War) and Nepos (Lives) an amount not less than Caesar, Gallic 
War, I-IV. 

b. Questions on the ordinary forms and constructions of Latin gram- 
mar and the translation of easy English sentences into Latin. 

3a. An examination on Cicero, speeches for the Manilian Law and 
for Archias, with questions on subject-matter, literary and historical 
allusions, and grammar. 

b. An examination in sight translation of Latin prose adapted to 
candidates who have read from Cicero (speeches, letters, and De Senec- 
tute) and Sallust (Catiline and Jugurthine War) an amount not less 
than Cicero, speeches against Catiline I-IV, for the Manilian Law, and 
for Archias. 

c. A test in writing simple Latin prose which shall demand a thoro 
knowledge of all regular inflections, all common irregular forms, and 
the ordinary syntax and vocabulary of the prose authors read in school. 

4a. An examination on Vergil, ^Eneid, I, II, and either IV or VI 
at the option of the candidate, with questions on subject matter, literary 
and historical allusions, and prosody. 

b. An examination in sight translation of Latin poetry adapted to 
candidates who have read from Vergil (Bucolics, Georgics, and Mneid) 
and Ovid (Metamorphoses, Fasti, and Tristia) an amount not less than 
Vergil, ^neid, I- VI. 

A candidate may obtain separate credit for each part except in the 
College of Arts and Sciences. Each represents a year's work and en- 
trance credit for one unit. 

In parts 2 and 3 candidates must deal satisfactorily with both the sight 
and set passages, or they will not be given credit for either. 

Greek. — The grammar, including prosody; Xenophon's Anabasis, books 
I-IV ; Homer's Iliad, books I-III ; the sight translation of easy passages 
from Xenophon; the translation into Greek of easy passages based on 
the required books of the Anabasis. For the last a vocabulary of less 
usual words will be furnished. Equivalent readings will be accepted in 
pla;? cf those prescribed. 



57 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



History 

Greek History.— History of Greece, to the capture of Corinth, 146 
B. C. ; Myers, Morey, or Botsford. 

Roman History. — A knowledge of Roman history, down to the death 
of Marcus Aurelius, such as may be obtained from Allen's Short His- 
tory of the Roman People, or from Meyer's Rome: Its Rise and Fall, 
or from Morey's Outlines of Roman History. 

English History. — A knowledge such as may be obtained from Mont- 
gomery, Coman and Kendall, Terry, or Cheyney's History of England. 

United States History and Civil Government. — A knowledge such 
as may be obtained from the works of Fiske, Hart, Montgomery, or 
McLaughlin. 

Mathematics 

Algebra. — The four fundamental operations for rational algebraic 
expressions ; factoring, determination of highest common factor and 
least common multiple by factoring; fractions, including complex frac- 
tions, and ratio and proportion ; linear equations, both numerical and 
literal, containing one or more unknown quantities ; problems depend- 
ing on linear equations ; radicals, including the extraction of the square 
root of polynomials and of numbers ; exponents, including fractional 
and negative; quadratic equations, both numerical and literal; simple 
cases of equations with one or more unknown quantities, that may be 
solved by the methods of linear or quadratic equations ; problems de- 
pending on quadratic equations ; the binomial theorem for positive 
integral exponents ; the formulas for the nth term and the sum of the 
terms of arithmetical and geometrical progressions, with applications. 

It is assumed that pupils are required thruout the course to solve 
numerous problems which involve putting questions into equations. 
Some of the problems should be chosen from mensuration, from physics, 
and from commercial life. The use of graphical methods and illustra- 
tions, particularly in connection with the solution of equations, is also 
expected. 

Plane Geometry. — The usual theorems and constructions of good 
text-books, including the general properties of plane rectilinear figures; 
the circle and the measurement of angles; similar polygons; areas; tegu- 
lar polygons and the measurement of the circle. 



58 



ADMISSION 



Solid Geometry. — The usual theorems and constructions of good text- 
books, including the relations of planes and lines in space; the prop- 
erties and measurement of prisms, pyramids, cylinders, and cones ; the 
sphere and the spherical triangle. 

Trigonometry. — Definitions and relations of the six trigonometric 
functions as ratios ; circular measurement of angles ; proofs of principal 
formulas, in particular for the sine, cosine, and tangent of the sum and 
the difference of two angles, of the double angle and the half angle ; 
the product expressions for the sum or the difference of two sines or of 
two cosines, etc. ; the transformation of trigonometric expressions by 
means of these formulas ; solution of trigonometric equations of a sim- 
ple character; theory and use of logarithms (without the introduction 
of work involving infinite series) ; the solution of right and oblique tri- 
angles, and practical applications. 

Advanced- Algebra.^ — Permutations and combinations, limited to 
simple cases; complex numbers, with graphical representation of sums 
and differences ; determinants, chiefly of the second, third, and fourth 
orders, including the use of minors and the solution of linear equations 
numerical equations of higher degree, and so much of the theory of 
equations, with graphical methods, as is necessary for their treatment, 
including Descartes's rule of signs and Homers method, but not Sturm's 
functions or multiple roots. 

Sciences 



*Biology. — This may consist of a continuous course for one year 
dealing with the problems of general biology, including the study of 
the structure, functions, and habits of both plants and animals ; a course 
for one year in botany alone ; a course for one year in zoology alone ; 
or a course for one-half year in human physiology. The human physi- 
ology may be arranged to form a part of the general biology, or of the 
zoology; but in such cases it must be treated as an integral part of the 
subject under consideration. 

♦Chemistry. — The necessary ground is covered by the following 
text-books: Brownlee and others, Hessler and Smith, McPherson and 
Henderson, Newell. 



59 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Physical Geography (Physiography). — A satisfactory preparation 
may be obtained from either Appleton's or Tarr's Physical Geography. 

♦Physics. — The work usually covered in one year in a good fitting 
school. 

The requirements in botany and zoology are the same as those of the 
College Entrance Examination Board, and are outlined in the syllabus 
of the board. The note-book should include properly labeled drawings, 
and descriptions of experiments, representing as much of the work in 
this syllabus as may be practicable, and should be the record of a year's 
laboratory work in the subject. The making of an herbarium is optional. 



*The work in these sciences must include certified note-books exhib- 
iting the results of experimental work performed by the student. In 
physics forty exercises are required and in chemistry fifty exercises. 
These note-books should be presented at the examination. In the case 
of students certified in the sciences, the principal is expected to pass 
upon the quality of the note-books rather than send them to the uni- 
versity. 



60 



ORGANIZATION OF THE UNIVERSITY 



ORGANIZATION OF THE UNIVERSITY 



The university is divided for purposes of administration into the 
Colleges of Agriculture, Arts and Sciences, Law, and Technology, and 
the Maine Agricultural Experiment Station. The policies of the uni- 
versity as a unit are determined by the Board of Trustees and the gen- 
eral faculty, but each division regulates those affairs which concern itself 
alone. 

College of Agriculture 

Curricula in Agronomy, Animal Husbandry, Biology, Dairy Hus- 
bandry, Forestry, Home Economics, Horticulture, Poultry Husbandry, 
and for Teachers of Agriculture. 

School Course in Agriculture (two years) 

Short Courses; Farmers' Week; Correspondence and Lecture Cours- 
es ; Demonstration Work. 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Major subjects may be selected in Biology, Chemistry, Economics 
and Sociology, Education, English, French, German, Greek and Clas- 
sical Archeology, History, Latin, Mathematics and Astronomy, Phi- 
losophy, Physics, and Spanish and Italian. 

College of Law 

This College offers a prescribed curriculum leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. 

College of Technology 

Curricula in Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, 
Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Pharmacy. 



61 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Maine Agricultural Experiment Station 

Offices and principal laboratories at Orono; Highmoor Farm at 
Monmouth; Aroostook Farm at Presque Isle. 



Graduate Courses leading to the Master's degree have been organ- 
ized. These courses are administered by the Committee on Graduate 
Study. 

A Summer Term of six weeks is maintained by the university. 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

The college year is divided equally into a fall semester and a spring 
semester. The minimum regular work for a semester in the College of 
of Arts and Sciences is fourteen hours a week (exclusive of physical 
training and military science). In the College of Agriculture and the 
College of Technology the minimum is seventeen hours a week (ex- 
clusive of physical training and military science). Thirty hours in 
the major subject represent the minimum requirement for a degree. 



62 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



FACULTY OF INSTRUCTION 

Leon Stephen Merrill, M. D. 

Director of the Agricultural Extension Service 
Dean 
Lucius Herbert Merrill, Sc. D. 

Professor of Biological and Agricultural Chemistry 
Fremont Lincoln Russell, B. S., V. S. 

Professor of Bacteriology and Veterinary Science 
Mintin Asbury Chrysler, Ph, D. Professor of Biology 

John Manvers Briscoe, M. F. Professor of Forestry 

George Edward Simmons, M. S. Professor of Agronomy 

Bliss S Brown, M. S. Professor of Horticulture 

Lamert Seymour Corbett, M. S. 

Professor of Animal Industry 
Frances Rowland Freeman, M. S. 

Professor of Home Economics 
Alice Middleton Boring, Ph. D. 

Associate Professor of Zoology 
Carleton Whidden Eaton, A. B., M. F. 

Associate Professor of Forestry 
Harold Scott Osler, B. S. Associate Professor of Agronomy 

Harry Newton Conser, M. S., M. A. 

Assistant Professor of Botany 
Harry Woodbury Smith, B. S. 

Assistant Professor of Bacteriology 
Frances Marie Whitcomb, B. S. 

Assistant Professor of Home Economics 
Herman Pittee Sweetser, B. S. Assistant Professor of Horticulture 
Harold Joseph Shaw 

County Agricultural Agent, Sagadahoc County 



63 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Clarence Wallace Barber, M. S. 

County Agricultural Agent, Cumberland County 
Clarence Albert Day 

County Agricultural Agent, Washington County 
Arthur Lowell Deering, B. S. 

County Agricultural Agent, Kennebec County 
Maurice Daniel Jones, B. S. 

County Agricultural Agent, Penobscot County 
George Albert Yeaton 

County Agricultural Agent, Oxford County 
Albert Kinsman Gardner, B. S. 

County Agricultural Agent, Franklin County 
Harold Harlan Nash 

County Agricultural Agent, York County 
George Pike Worden, B. S. 

County Agricultural Agent, Cumberland County 
Ralph Pike Mitchell 

State Leader of Boys' Agriculture Club Work 
Joseph Henry Bodwell, B. S. 

County Agricultural Agent, Piscataquis County 
Roger Locke Go well, B. S. 

County Agricultural Agent, Knox County 
Robert Mark Stiles 

County Agricultural Agent, Somerset County 
William Collins Monahan, B. S. 

Extension Instructor in Poultry Work 
Paul Wheeler Monohon, B. S. 

Assistant County Agent Leader 
Catharine Norton Platts, S. B. 

Extension Instructor in Home Economics 
Kathryn Taylor Gordon, S. B. 

Extension Instructor in Home Economics 
Mary Isabel Haskell, S. B. 

State Leader Girls' Agricultural Club Work 
Neil Carpenter Sherwood, B. S. 

Extension Instructor in Dairying 
fDoROTHEA Beach Instructor in Home Economics 



fAbsent on leave, without pay, September 1, 1916, to September 1, 1917 

64 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



Sidney Winfield Patterson, B. S. 

Instructor in Biological and Agricultural Chemistry 

Helen Ann Knight, Ph. B. Instructor in Home Economics 
Alton Willard Richardson, B. S. 

Instructor in Animal Industry 

J Fred Thomas, B. S. Instructor in Animal Industry 

Stanley Ben Sink, B. Sc. Instructor in Agronomy 

Richard Theodore Muller, B. S. Instructor in Horticulture 

Abraham Strauss, B. Sc. Instructor in Botany 

Esther McGinnis, B. Sc. Instructor in Home Economics 

Oscar Milton Wilbur, B. S. Instructor in Animal Industry 

Percy Barnette Wiltberger, M. Sc. Instructor in Entomology 

Donald Vince Atwater, B. S. Assistant in Biology 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

The College of Agriculture comprises the Departments of Agricul- 
tural Extension, Agronomy, Animal Industry, Biological and Agricul- 
tural Chemistry, Biology, Farm Management and Agricultural Engineer- 
ing, Forestry, Home Economics, Horticulture, and Veterinary Science and 
Bacteriology. The aim of this college is to train young men for ser- 
vice as farmers, teachers of agriculture and the allied sciences in schools 
and colleges, investigators in agricultural experiment stations, and for- 
esters; and to prepare young women to become teachers of home econ- 
omics and to comprehend the problems of administration in the home 
and in public institutions. On entering either a four-year curriculum 
or the two-year School Course in Agriculture a student is required to 
fill out a practical experience blank. Those who have not had experience 
in general farming are required to work during at least one summer va- 
cation on some farm approved by the faculty of the college. 

The college curricula are designed for those who wish to follow 
general farming, animal husbandry, dairy husbandry, poultry husbandry, 
horticulture, home economics, chemistry as related to experiment 
station work, biological chemistry, bacteriology and veterinary science, 
biology, farm management, and forestry either as a business or as a pro- 
fession. 

One of the following curricula, embracing 150 college hours each, 
is required for the students pursuing a four-year curriculum in the Col- 
lege of Agriculture. 



65 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



The courses of instruction are organized as follows : 

1. Regular Curricula 

The four-year general curricula in Agronomy, Animal Hus- 
bandry, Biology, Dairy Husbandry, Forestry, Home Economics, 
Horticulture, and Poultry Husbandry, and the four-year cur- 
riculum for Teachers in General Agriculture 

2. Short Courses 

The two-year School Course in Agriculture 

The short winter courses in General Agriculture, Dairying, 

Horticulture, and Poultry Management 
Farmers' week 

3. Extension Courses 

The correspondence courses 

The lecture courses 

Movable or extension schools 

CURRICULA IN AGRICULTURE 

Certain studies are fundamental to all work in agricultural lines. As 
many as possible of these studies are offered in the first two years, 
during which the student is necessarily given no choice of courses. 
By the beginning of the junior year each student must decide whether 
he is to specialize in Agronomy, Animal Husbandry, Biology, Dairy Hus- 
bandry, Home Economics, Horticulture, or Poultry Husbandry. To 
specialize in any of these lines, he must during his junior and senior 
years take the studies given in the schedules which follow. 

Students who contemplate entering agricultural experiment station 
work should elect the course offered by the Department of Agricultural 
Chemistry covering the qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis 
of fodders, fertilizers, and dairy products. They should also elect a 
preparatory course in quantative chemical analysis. 

The elective subjects are selected with the advice of the major in- 
structor. 

Before receiving their degrees candidates must satisfy the faculty 
that they are familiar with the methods of conducting operations in- 
cident to general farming. This does not apply to students who major 
in Biology, Forestry, and Home Economics. 



66 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



Curriculum for the First Two Years for All Students Taking 
Four-year Curricula in Agriculture 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Subject Hours 

Agronomy 11, f4 2 

Chemistry 1 or 3 2 

Chemistry 5, f4 2 

Drawing 9, *3 1 

Public Speaking 3 1 

English 7 2 

Military 1, *3 1 

Modern Language 3 

Zoology 1, 2, f4 4 

Physical Training 1 ^ 



Spring Semester 
Subject Hours 

Animal Industry 2 2 

Animal Industry 4, f2 1 

Botany 2, 2 f4 4 

Chemistry 2 or 4 3 

Chemistry 6, f4 2 

Drawing 10, *3 1 

Public Speaking 4 1 

English 8 2 

Military 2, *3 1 

Modern Language 2 

Physical Training 2 1 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Agronomy 1, 2 *3 3 Agronomy 12, 2 f2.. 

Animal Industry 3 2 

Animal Industry 5, f2 1 

Biochemistry 1 2 

Biology 3 2 

Chemistry 15, 2 f2 3 

Mathematics 11 3 

Military 1, *3 1 

Poultry Husbandry 1, 2 f2 3 



Biochemistry 2, 3 f4 5 

Biology 8, 2 f4 4 

Horticulture 2, 2 *3 3 

Mathematics 12 2 

Military 2, *3 1 

Poultry Husbandry 2, 1 f2 2 



67 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Curriculum for Students Specializing in Agronomy 

JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Subject Hours 

Agronomy 13, 1 f2 2 

Animal Industry 7, 2 f4 4 

Bacteriology 1, f6 3 

Bacteriology 3 2 

Biology 9, 2 f6 5 

English 17 2 

Elective 2 



Spring Semester 
Subject Hours 

Agricultural Chemistry 6 2 

Agronomy 14, 1 f2 2 

Agronomy 16, 1 f2 2 

Agronomy 18 2 

Animal Industry 6 2 

Biology 10, 2 f6 5 

English 18 2 

Elective 3 



SENIOR YEAR 

Agronomy 3 2 Farm Management 2, f4 2 

Agronomy 15, 1 f2 2 Farm Management 72, 2 *3— 3 

Farm Management 71, 2 *3 3 Farm Management 74, 2 *3.... 3 

Elective 10 Elective 7 



Curricula for Students Specializing in Animal Industry 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Animal Industry 7, 2 f4 4 

Bacteriology 1, f6 3 

Bacteriology 3 2 

Biology 51, 2 f4 4 

English 17 2 

Farm Management 71, 2 *3 3 



Agricultural Chemistry 6 2 

Animal Industry 6 2 

Animal Industry 52, \2 1 

Bacteriology 52, f6 3 

Biology 52, 2 f4 4 

English 18 2 

Veterinary Science 14 3 

Veterinary Science 16 1 



68 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Subject Hours 

Agronomy 3 2 

Animal Industry 53 2 

Veterinary Science 15 2 

Veterinary Science 17 — 1 

Veterinary Science 19 2 

Elective 9 



Spring Semester 
Subject Hours 

Animal Industry 54 2 

Farm Management 2, f4 2 

Farm Management 72, 2 *3..~ 3 
Elective 11 



DAIRY HUSBANDRY 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Animal Industry 7, 2 f4 4 

Bacteriology 1, f6 3 

Bacteriology 3 2 

English 17 2 

Farm Management 71, 2 *3 3 

Elective 1 



Agricultural Chemistry 6 2 

Animal Industry 6 2 

Animal Industry 8, 1 *6 3 

Bacteriology 52, "\6 3 

English 18 2 

Veterinary Science 14 3 

Veterinary Science 16 1 

Elective 3 



SENIOR YEAR 



Agronomy 3 2 

Animal Industry 9, 2 *6 4 

Animal Industry 51 3 

Veterinary Science 15 2 

Veterinary Science 17 1 

Elective 6 



Bacteriology 54, f4 or f6...2 or 3 

Farm Management 2, f4. 2 

Farm Management 72 f 2 *3.... 3 
Elective 10 or 9 



69 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



POULTRY HUSBANDRY 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Subject Hours 

Animal Industry 7, 2 f4 4 

Bacteriology 1, f6 3 

Bacteriology 3 2 

Biology 51, 2 f4 4 

English 17 2 

Poultry Husbandry 3, 1 f2 2 

Elective 2 



Spring Semester 
Subject Hours 

Agricultural Chemistry 6 2 

Animal Industry 6 2 

Biology 52, 2 f4 4 

English 18 2 

Poultry Husbandry 4, 1 f2_ 2 

Elective 7 



SENIOR YEAR 



Agronomy 3 2 

Farm Management 71, 2 *3 3 

Poultry Husbandry 5 2 

Poultry Husbandry 7, 2 f2 3 

Elective 7 



Farm Management 2, f4 2 

Farm Management 72, 2 *3 3 

Poultry Husbandry 6, 3 f2_ 4 

Veterinary Science 12 2 

Elective 6 



Curriculum in Horticulture 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Bacteriology 3 2 

Biology 9, 2 f6 5 

English 17 2 

Horticulture 1, 2, f2 3 

Horticulture 7, 2 f2 3 

Horticulture 9, 2 f2 3 



Agricultural Chemistry 6 2 

Animal Industry 6 2 

Bacteriology 2, f6 3 

Biology 10, 2 f6 5 

English 18 2 

Horticulture 10 - 2 

Elective 2 



SENIOR YEAR 



Agronomy 3 2 

Farm Management 71, 2 *3 3 

Horticulture 3, 2 f2 3 

Horticulture 5, 2 f2 3 

Horticulture 51 _ 1 

Elective 6 



Farm Management 2, f4 2 

Horticulture 4, 2 f2 3 

Horticulture 8, 2 f2 3 

Horticulture 52 1 

Elective 9 



70 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



Curriculum in Biology 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Bacteriology 3 2 

English 17 „ 2 

Geology 5 3 

Modern Language 3 

Plant Histology 61 .. } 

or V4 

Vertebrate Anatomy 51 J 

Elective .. 3 



Bacteriology 2, |6 

English 18 

Modern Language 

Plant Pathology 66 

or 

Elective 

Animal Embryology 52.. 

Plant Physiology 62 

Elective 



SENIOR YEAR 



Animal Physiology 53.. 
or Plant Taxonomy 
and Morphology 63.. 

Biology Seminar.. 



Thesis or Elective 3 

Vertebrate Anatomy 51 ^ 

or >4 

Plant Histology 61 i 

Elective 6J4 



Animal Embryology.. 



Plant Physiology 

Animal Histology 54 

or Plant Pathology 66 

or Elective 

Biology Seminar. 

Thesis or Elective 3 

Elective 6 or 7 



71 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Forestry Curriculum 

A complete undergraduate curriculum is arranged which will serve 
as the basis not only for practical work in forestry, but also for a liberal 
education. During the first two years much attention is given to biology 
and civil engineering, both of which are important fundamental subjects 
upon which are built the technical forestry courses. A knowledge of 
the principles of forestry in its different branches is gained by the student 
and considerable practical work is done in the forest. The wood- 
lands belonging to the university, together with adjacent lands covered 
by young forest, furnish a field for the study of many forest problems. 
Field trips are made and demonstration thinnings and plantings made at 
various places thruout the State. 

The instruction in this department consists of lectures, recitations, 
laboratory, and field work; the latter consumes a considerable portion 
of the scheduled time during the junior and senior years. 



Subj ect 



Curriculum in Forestry 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Hours Subject 



Hours 



Fall Semester 

Chemistry 1 or 3 2 

Chemistry 5, f4 2 

Drawing 1, *6 2 

English 7 2 

Forestry 1 2 

Mathematics 1 3 

Military 1, *3 1 

Zoology 1, 2 f4 4 



Spring Semester 

Botany 2, 2, f4 4 

Chemistry 2 or 4 3 

Chemistry 6, f4 2 

Drawing 2, *6 2 

English 8 2 

Mathematics 2 3 

Mathematics 12 2 

Military 2, *3 1 



Physical Training jA Physical Training 1 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Agronomy 1, 2 *3 3 

Biology 67, 2 f4 4 

Civil Engineering 1 2*^ 

Economics lb 2 

English 9 2 

Military 1, *3 1 

Modern Language 3 

Public Speaking 3 1 



Biology 8, 2 f4 4 

Biology 68, 2 f4 4 

Civil Engineering 2 1 

Civil Engineering 4 1 

Economics 2b 2 

English 10 2 

Forestry 10 1 

Military 2, *3 1 

Modern Language 2 

Public Speaking 4 1 



72 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Biology 61, 2 f4 4 

Civil Engineering 21 1 

Civil Engineering 23 1 

Civil Engineering 27 1 

Forestry 11 2 

Forestry 13, *6 2 

Horticulture 5, 2 f2 3 

Modern Language 3 

Elective 3 



Spring Semester 



Biology 62, 2 f4 4 

Civil Engineering 22 2 

Civil Engineering 24 2 

Forestry 4 1 

Forestry 6 2 

Forestry 8, *6 2 

Forestry 28 1 

Modern Language 2 

Elective 3 



SENIOR YEAR 



Forestry 3 2 

Forestry 5 1 

Forestry 9 1 

Forestry 15 2 

Forestry 17, *6 2 

Forestry 19 2 

Forestry 21, *6 2 

Elective 6 



Biology 66 3 

Forestry 12 2 

Forestry 14, *6 2 

Forestry 16 2 

Forestry 18, *6 2 

Forestry 20 2 

Forestry 24 1 

Elective 3 



Curriculum in Home Economics 

This curriculum leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science (in Home 
Economics). In addition to the prescribed studies, elective courses are 
offered for those who plan to teach. 

Laboratory fees are as follows : Courses 1, 2, 7, 8, 12, 13, 17, each $1 a 
semester. Courses 5, 6, 10 11, each $6 a semester. All materials for gar- 
ment making must be provided by the students. 

Students taking courses 5, 6, 10, and 11 are required to wear in the 
laboratory white tailored waists, high collars, washable ties, caps, shoes 
with rubber heels, and white aprons with bibs. They must also be 
provided with small white hand towels. 



73 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Curriculum in Home Economics 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Subject Hours 

Chemistry 1 or 3 2 

Chemistry 5, f4 2 

English 7 2 

History 7 3 

Home Economics 1, 1 f4 3 

Home Economics 3, 1 f2 2 

Modern Language 3 



Spring Semester 
Subject Hours 

Chemistry 2 or 4 3 

Chemistry 6, f4 2 

English 8 2 

History 8 3 

Home Economics 2, 1 f4 3 

Home Economics 4, 1 f2 2 

Modern Language 2 



Physical Training ^ Physical Training 1 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Art 3 2 Art 4 2 

Chemistry 15, 2 f2 3 Botany 2, 2 f4 4 

Elementary Physiology 5, 2 f4.. 4 English 30 3 

English 29 3 Food Analysis 8, 1 f6 4 

Home Economics 5, 2 f4 4 Home Economics 6, 2 f4 4 

Modern Language 3 Modern Language 2 

Physical Training y 2 Physical Training 1 

JUNIOR YEAR 



Bacteriology 1, f6 3 

Bacteriology 3 2 

Biochemistry 7, 3 f4 5 

Home Economics 7, 2 f4 4 

Philosophy 51 3 

Elective 3 



Home Economics 8, f6 3 

Home Economics 10, 3 f4 5 

Philosophy 52 3 

Physics 8, 4 f2 5 

Elective 3 



SENIOR YEAR 



English 45 3 

Home Economics 9 3 

Home Economics 17, 1 f4 3 

Sociology 55 3 

Elective 6 



Home Economics 12, 3 f2 4 

Home Economics 14 2 

Home Economics 18, 1 f4 3 

Sociology 56 3 

Elective 6 



Students desiring to teach should elect Education 51 and 52, and 
Home Economics 16. 



74 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



Special Courses in Agriculture and Home Economics 

The Special Courses in Agriculture and Home Economics are designed 
for young men and women who cannot spend four years in preparation, 
but who desire to secure special training. No fixed schedule of studies 
is prescribed, but students may elect along the line of horticulture, dairy- 
ing, poultry management, veterinary science, agricultural chemistry, bac- 
teriology, farm management, general agriculture, or home economics. 

Persons not candidates for a degree who desire to take special studies 
may be permitted to do so, if, upon examination, they give satisfactory 
evidence that they are prepared to pursue them. This privilege is intend- 
ed for students of unusual maturity or previous advancement in par- 
ticular subjects, and not for those who are incompetent to pursue a regu- 
lar course. If they subsequently desire to become candidates for a 
degree, they will be required to meet all the entrance requirements. 

The annual expenses for courses of one year or more are the same as 
those for students in the four-year curricula. Tuition is free to resi- 
dents of Maine except in Forestry and Biology. 

Two-year School Course in Agriculture 

This is a course designed to train young men and women who wish 
to become practical farmers, farm superintendents, dairymen, poultry- 
men or gardeners, but who cannot devote time to high school or college 
training. 

The same equipment is used as in the four-year curricula, but the 
work is of a more elementary nature. All the classes are separate and 
distinct from the four-year classes, and in no case will college credit 
be allowed for work done in the School Course. 

There are no entrance examinations required of those who desire to 
enter the School Course. Students over fifteen years of age who are 
prepared for advanced grammar or high school work are eligible for 
registration. No tuition is charged in this course, but the same regis- 
tration and incidental fees of fifteen dollars a semester, or thirty dollars a 
year, are charged School Course in Agriculture students as are charged 
all others attending the university. Fees amounting to two dollars and 
fifty cents are charged in each of the carpentry and blacksmithing 
courses to cover cost of material used. Fees are also charged in several 
agricultural laboratories. 

The practical side of the work in this course is strongly emphasized, 
and since students are expected to be able to do work and handle men 

75 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



when they are finished, those taking this course are required to spend 
the summer vacation between the first and second years in work either 
at the college or on some farm approved by the faculty. 

On completion of the course a certificate is awarded those who have 
satisfactorily done the work. 



FIRST YEAR 



Fall Semester 

Subject Hours 

Animal Husbandry, 3 f2 4 

Business Arithmetic and Farm 

Accounts 2 

Carpentry, *3 1 

English 3 

Farm Crops, 3 *3 4 

Fruit Handling, 3 *3 4 

Poultry Husbandry 2 

SECOND 

Animal Husbandry, 3 f2 4 

English 2 

Farm Chemistry 3 

Farm Crops 2 

Farm Engineering and Me- 
chanics 1 *3 2 

Poultry Husbandry 2 

Vegetable Gardening, 3 *3 4 

Veterinary Science 3 



Spring Semester 
Subject Hours 

Dairy Husbandry, 3 *3 4 

English 3 

Farm Botany 2 

Forge Work, *3 1 

Fruit Growing, 3 *3 4 

Poultry Husbandry, 2 f2 3 

Soils and Fertilizers, 3 *3 4 



YEAR 

Animal Husbandry, 3 f2 4 

English 2 

Farm Management, 3 *3 4 

Forestry 2 

Insects 2 

Poultry Husbandry 2 

Small Fruit Culture and Plant 

Propagation, 3 *3 4 

Veterinary Science 3 



Short Winter Courses in General Agriculture, Dairying, Horti- 
culture, and Poultry Management 

The short courses in general agriculture deal especially with farm 
crops. Special attention is given to the potato, corn, oat, and hay 
crops, — the preparation of seed bed, selection of seed, seeding, fer- 
tilization, culture, and harvesting. Such general subjects as drainage, 
maintenance of soil fertility, rotation of crops, control of weeds, etc., 
are considered. Potato, corn, and grain judging is made a prominent 
feature. 



76 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



The short course in dairying is designed to meet the requirements 
of creamery assistants, practical farmers, herdsmen, and others who 
desire to learn milk testing, butter making, the principles of animal 
nutrition, and practices of feeding, breeding, judging stock, and the 
diseases of farm animals. 

The short course in horticulture is offered for those who wish to 
acquaint themselves with the most approved methods of orchard man- 
agement. Special attention will be given to such subjects as the selec- 
tion of orchard sites, selecting and obtaining nursery stock, pruning, 
cultivation, spraying, packing, and cooperation in the fruit business. 
Opportunity will be given for the laboratory study of spraying, packing, 
planting, pruning, and grafting. An effort is made to show where money 
is lost and made in the fruit business. 

The short course in poultry management is given each year to aid 
persons who wish to gain a practical knowledge of the handling of incu- 
bators and brooders, the feeding and rearing of young chicks, the 
general management of mature fowls, scoring, judging, killing, and 
marketing. For purposes of instruction the College of Agriculture 
keeps representatives of leading breeds of fowls. 

Very few text-books are used in any of the courses and the expenses 
for board and room, which are the only other expenses, are moderate. 
Circulars giving the dates and programs of these courses are published 
each year and will be sent upon application to the College of Agriculture. 

Farmers' Week 

There are a large number of people who cannot come to the college 
for a great length of time, but who desire a few days of practical in- 
struction. To reach and accommodate these, "Farmers* Week" is held. 
Lectures on practical agricultural subjects are given morning, afternoon, 
and evening. Practical demonstrations occupy a part of each afternoon. 
Besides the practical subjects discussed, one or more sessions are given 
up to problems of rural betterment. A section is arranged where home 
economics for farmers' wives is taught. Dates and programs may be 
secured each year by addressing the College of Agriculture. 

Department of Agricultural Extension 

This department offers correspondence courses, lecture courses, dem- 
onstration work, cooperative experiments, and extension schools in agri- 
culture. 

77 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



This work is intended to give direct help to those on the farm and in 
the home; to aid those who desire definite instructions in practical agri- 
culture, animal and dairy husbandry, poultry husbandry, home economics, 
forestry, and horticulture. It supplements the teaching and experimenting 
of the College of Agriculture and the Agricultural Experiment Station. 
It is professedly a popular work because it endeavors to aid the farmer 
to solve the practical problems of the farm, to quicken agricultural work, 
and to inspire greater interest in country life. 

Correspondence Courses 

These courses are given by means of text-books and publications of 
the college, the U. S. Department of Agriculture, or the various ex- 
periments stations. The text-books are furnished at publishers' prices. 
The courses are free and may be taken by individuals, granges, reading 
circles, or other organizations. A certificate will be given to students 
completing any of these courses with satisfactory standing. 

The following courses are offered: 

Course 1 — Farm Crops and Crop Production 

Course 2 — Farm Management 

Course 3 — Feeding and Breeding of Farm Animals and Dairying 

Course A — Poultry Keeping 

Course 5 — Fruit Growing 

Course 7 — Elementary Agriculture 

Course 8 — Home Economics 

Course 9 — Vegetable Gardening 

Course 10 — The Business of Dairying 

Lecture Courses 

Lectures in these courses are given under the auspices of granges, 
clubs, societies, and other gatherings by the members of the agricul- 
tural faculty. 

A complete list of the lectures will be forwarded on request. 

Demonstration Work 

For this work members of the agricultural faculty will make demon- 
strations, showing, as well as telling, how to solve many practical farm 



78 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



problems. These demonstrations are made on the farms and are offered 
under the same conditions as the lectures. 

The following is a practical list of the demonstrations that may be 
secured : home mixing of fertilizers ; milk testing (use of Babcock 
tester); stock judging; corn and small grain judging and breeding; 
potato judging, breeding, and spraying; orchard spraying, pruning, and 
grafting; apple packing; method of killing and dressing poultry; method 
of determining the age of horses; methods of giving medicine to domes- 
tic animals. All demonstrations are accompanied by lectures. 

Farm Demonstration Work 

This form of extension service consists of practical demonstrations of 
farming operations, of the values of various projects, and of proper 
equipment in the farming business. 

The demonstration work is now established in thirteen counties, with 
every prospect of spreading to the remaining counties in the State within 
a few years. 

Boys' and Girls' Agricultural Clubs 

The organization of junior agricultural and home economics clubs 
was begun in 1913, under the direction of the Extension Department, 
with State leaders in active charge of the field work. The club work is 
conducted very largely in cooperation with the chools, granges, and 
the Y. M. C. A. county work. It will be extender thruout the State as 
rapidly as possible. Local exhibits will be held the present year and the 
winners at these exhibits will compete later in a State contest to be 
held at the College of Agriculture. 

Extension Schools in Agriculture 

To extend the advantages of agricultural instruction to persons 
actively engaged in agriculture, the Extension Department will conduct 
a limited number of three-day schools in various parts of the State. 

Correspondence 

Besides the Demonstration, Correspondence, and Lecture Courses, the 
College of Agriculture welcomes correspondence on practical farm 



79 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



topics. If information is desired along lines relating to crops, fertilizers, 
dairy work, feeding, or orcharding and gardening, the various instructors 
are ready to give such assistance as they are able. 

A free "Extension Bulletin," dealing with agricultural and home 
economics subjects, is issued at frequent intervals thruout the year. 
This bulletin is sent to all persons whose names appear on the bulletin 
mailing list and to such other persons as may apply for the same. 

Circulars giving full information upon these subjects will be sent 
upon request. 



80 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



Note. — A star (*) before the time designated for a course indicates 
that three hours of actual work are required to obtain credit for one 
hour; a dagger (f) indicates that two hours are required to obtain this 
credit; a double dagger ($) indicates that two and one-half hours are 
required. Courses having an odd number are given in the fall semester 
and those having an even number in the spring semester. 

If the student so elects, he may prepare a thesis upon some subject 
related to his major work. The subject should be selected and approved 
by the head of the department before the close of the junior year. 

AGRONOMY 

Professor Simmons; Assistant Professor Osler; Mr Sink 

Soils 
For undergraduates only 

1. Soils. — Lectures and recitations on the origin, types, physical prop- 
erties, moisture content, and distribution of soils, and their relation to 
crop production. The fundamental principles underlying soil manage- 
ment for soil conservation and improvement will be studied. Class 
room, two hours a week; laboratory, *three hours a week. 

3 Soil Fertility. — This course deals with stable manures, green 
manures, commercial fertilizers, and soil amendments; also a study of 
soil organisms as affecting the plant food in the soil. Two hours a week. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

52. Soil Surveying and Mapping. — A study is made of soil types, 
the principles of correlation and methods of soil surveying and map- 
ping. Class room, two hours a week; laboratory, *three hours a week. 



81 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



54. Soil Fertility. — Soil improvement investigation. A review of 
the experimental work in this country and abroad. The application of 
these results to soil improvement and crop production problems. Pre- 
requisites, Courses 1 and 3. Two hours a week. 

Crops 
For undergraduates only 

11. Field Crops. — A laboratory course in seed and grain identifica- 
tion, improvement by grading, testing, selecting, and preparing seed for 
planting. A collection of weeds and their seeds will be required. fFour 
hours a week. 

12. Field Crops. — A general course including a study of the most 
important cereal, grass, forage, and root crops, their adaptation to sys- 
tems of rotation, culture and uses, with special reference to New England 
conditions. Class room, two hours a week; laboratory, ^two hours a week. 

13. Field Crops. Judging and Commercial Grading. — Comparative 
judging of corn, small grains, and potatoes, according to standards. A 
study of market grade requirements. Class room, one hour a week; 
laboratory, fftt/o hours a week. 

14. Field Crops. Corn. — A course dealing with the production of 
corn and the care and marketing of the crop. Types and varieties of 
both field and sweet corn will be considered in this course. Class room, 
one hour a week; laboratory, \two hours a week. 

15. Field Crops. Roots and Tubers. — A course dealing with the 
production, storage, and marketing of roots and tubers. Class room, 
•ne hour a week; laboratory, \two hours a week. 

16. Field Crops. Grasses and Forage Crops. — Lectures and labora- 
tory work dealing with the grasses and forage plants. A study of the 
hay crop and markets ; soiling systems, and their adaptation to local con- 
ditions. Class room, one hour a week; laboratory, ftwo hours a week. 

18. Field Crops. Crop Improvement. — A study of the principles 
and methods involved in field crop improvement. The work of experi- 



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COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

ment stations in this country and abroad is reviewed. Prerequisites, 
Courses 11 and 12. Two hours a week. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

62. Systematic Field Crops. — A course designed for advanced or 
graduate students preparing for experimental work, teaching, or plant 
breeding. Students will be expected to grow and collect material under 
the supervision of the department during the summer months. Prerequi- 
site, adequate training in botany and field crops. Time must be arranged 
with the instructor not later than the middle of the junior year. Two 
or more hours a week. 

63. Systematic Field Crops. — A continuation of Course 62. Two 
or more hours a zveek. 

65. Seminar. — A study of recent literature, problems, and experi- 
ments pertaining to agronomy and farm management. One hour a 
week. 

66. Seminar. — A continuation of Course 65. One hour a week. 

67. 68. Thesis. — Three hours a week. 

ANIMAL INDUSTRY 

Professor Corbett; Mr. Thomas; Mr. Sherwood; Mr. Richardson 

Animal and Dairy Husbandry 
For undergraduates only 

2. Types and Breeds of Farm Animals. — A study of the types and 
breeds of farm animals. A course covering the history, development, 
and characteristics of farm animals. Two hours a week. 

3. Care, Feed, and Management of Live Stock. — A course dealing 
with the selection, breeding, growing, and maintenance of horses, cattle, 
sheep, and swine. Prerequisites, Courses 2 and 4. Two hours a week. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



4. Live Stock Judging. — This course is designed to acquaint the 
students with the types and breed characteristics of farm animals, by 
use of the score card, comparative judging, and the selection of breeding 
stock. To be taken in connection with Course 2. fTwo hours a week. 

5. Live Stock Judging. — A continuation of Course 4. "fTwo hours 
a week. 

6. Live Stock Feeding. — A study in the general principles of nutri- 
tion as applied to live stock, composition of feed stuffs, comparison and 
use of feeding standards, calculating rations, methods of feeding for 
economic production. Prerequisites, Course 3, Biochemistry 1 and 2. 
Two hours a week. 

7. General Dairying. — Given by lectures, assigned readings, recita- 
tions, and laboratory practice. Milk; its secretion, composition, proper- 
ties, pasteurization, separation; dairy practices in handling milk and 
cream, dairy equipment, use of common dairy machinery; preparation 
of starters; test of dairy products for fat (Babcock method), acidity, 
total solids, common adulterations, and preservatives. Class room, two 
hours a week; laboratory, ^four hours a week. 

8. Butter Making. — Lectures and laboratory practice in starter 
making, cream ripening, churning, and preparing butter for market. 
Prerequisite, Course 7. Class room, one hour a week; laboratory, fsix 
hours a week. 

9. Cheese Making. — Lectures, recitations, and laboratory practice 
in the manufacture and curing of various types of cheese, including 
Cheddar and soft cheeses adapted to the New England trade. The 
laboratory work requires consecutive hours. Prerequisite, Course 7. 
Class room, two hours a week; laboratory, *six hours a week. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

51. Dairy Technology. — A study of dairy products ; dairy by-pro- 
ducts ; factory machinery and operations ; certified milk ; markets and 
marketing; educational work with dairymen. Given by lectures, reci- 
tations, assigned readings, and round table conferences. Prerequisite, 
Course 7. Three hours a week. 



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COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



52. Advanced Live Stock Judging and Management. — A laboratory 
course in which the indivdual student gets experience in handling live 
stock and preparation of stock for the show ring and market. As far as 
possible, visits will be made to live stock farms. "\Two hours a week. 

53. Advanced Live Stock Feeding and Management. — Nutrition 
and feeding experiments, as well as the methods and practices of the 
most successful feeders in the production of milk, meat, and the rearing 
of horses, are studied. Two hours a week. 

54. Advanced Animal Breeding. — Principles and theories of breed- 
ing as applied to the live stock industry; study of pedigrees and records 
by the use of the different herd books; an economic study of the gen- 
erative systems of domestic animals. Prerequisites, Course 3, and Veteri- 
nary Science 6. Two hours a week. 

55. 56. Thesis. — Three hours a week. 

58. Ice Cream Making. — Lectures and recitations on the history 
and methods of the manufacture of ice cream and ices. Laboratory 
practice in the manufacture of ice cream and ices. Prerequisite, Course 
51. Class room, one hour a week; laboratory, three hours a week. 

Poultry Husbandry 
For undergraduates only 

1. Types, Breeds, and Management of Poultry. — Lectures and 
recitations on the origin and development of the types, breeds, and 
varieties of fowl, ducks, geese, and turkeys ; the general care, feed and 
management of farm poultry; the marketing of poultry products. 
Laboratory exercises include practice in poultry management, poultry 
judging, and the preparation of poultry products for market. Class 
room, two hours a week; laboratory, ^two hours a week. 

2. Types, Breeds, and Management of Poultry. — A continuation of 
Course 1. Class room, one hour a week; laboratory, ^two hours. 

3. Commercial Poultry Farming. — Lectures and recitations on the 
business of poultry farming; the systems and operations in use on large 

85 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



poultry farms; the planning of specialized poultry farms. Class room, 
one hour a week; laboratory, "ftwo hours a week. 

4. Poultry Feeding. — Lectures and recitations on the general prin- 
ciples of nutrition as applied to poultry; poultry feeds; calculating 
rations ; estimating cost of feeds and feeding, and methods of feeding 
for economical production. Prerequisites, Courses 1 and 2. Class 
room, one hour a week; laboratory, "\two hours a week. 

5. Poultry Literature. — A study of experimental data on poultry 
management. Prerequisites, Courses 1, 2, and 4. Class room, two 
hours a week. 

6. Incubation and Brooding. — Lectures and recitations on the prin- 
ciples of incubation and brooding. Laboratory practice in incubator and 
brooder management. Prerequisites, Courses 1 and 2. Class room, 
three hours a week; laboratory, "\two hours a week. 



Note. During incubation period, extra time will be required. 

7. Poultry Breeding. — Lectures and recitations on the principles of 
breeding as applied to poultry; the inheritance of egg production; 
systems of breeding stock. Prerequisites, Courses 1, 2, and 4. Class 
room, two hours a week; laboratory, itwo hours a week. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

51, 52. Thesis. — Three hours a week. 

BACTERIOLOGY AND VETERINARY SCIENCE 

Professor Russell; Assistant Professor Smith 
For undergraduates only 

1. Bacteriology. — A laboratory course in general bacteriology. Open 
to all students. The work includes the preparation of the usual culture 
media and the study of the morphological and biological characteristics 
of typical bacteria. Some outside reading will be required. Required 
of students taking major work in Agriculture. "fSix hours a week. 



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COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



2. Bacteriology. — Similar to Bacteriology 1. Offered for students 
in the College of Technology and others who may elect it. fSix hours 
a week. 

3. Bacteriology. — A lecture course open to all students. It should 
be elected by students taking Course 1 as well as by students not taking 
a laboratory course. Subjects considered will include the history of 
bacteriology; classification and biological characteristics of bacteria, 
bacteria in air, water, soil, and dairy products; the relation of bacteria 
to health and disease; immunity. Two hours a week. 

12. Veterinary Science. — This deals with the anatomy, physiology, 
and diseases of poultry. Two hours a week. 

14. Veterinary Science. — A combined lecture and laboratory course 
dealing with the anatomy and physiology of our domestic animals, and 
their treatment to preserve and restore health. Three hours a week. 

15. Veterinary Science. — A continuation of Course 14. Two hours 
a week. 

16. Veterinary Science. — A clinic open to all students taking vet- 
erinary science. One hour a week. 

17. Veterinary Science. — A continuation of Course 16. One hour 
a week. 

19. Veterinary Science. — Veterinary materia medica and pharmacy. 
Two hours a week. 



For graduates and undergraduates 

52. Bacteriology. — A study of the physiology of bacteria; bacterio- 
logical analysis of water; investigation into the sources of milk bacteria. 
Prerequisite, Course 1 or 2. Class room, one hour a week; laboratory, 
Iff our hours a week. 

53. Bacteriology. — A study of the physiology of bacteria; bacterio- 
logical analysis of water; a study of soil bacteria. Prerequisite, 



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UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Course 1 or 2. Class room, one hour a week; laboratory, if our hours 
a week. 

54. Bacteriology. — A course which will consider such dairy ex- 
periments as the effect of pasteurization on milk bacteria; quantitative 
bacterial determination of butter and cheese; study of typical milk bac- 
teria; use of special biochemic tests for quality of milk; study of effect 
of separators, clarifiers, coolers, etc., on the bacterial content of milk and 
cream. Prerequisite, Course 52. "\Four to six hours a week. 

55. Bacteriology. — An experimental consideration of ammonifica- 
tion, nitrification, and denitrification in the soil; study of relation of 
bacteria to soil fertility; symbiosis. Prerequisite, Course 52. "\Four to 
six hours a week. 

56. Bacteriology. — Lectures and reference work upon various prob- 
phases of sanitary milk production; relation of microorganisms to but- 
ter and cheese; discussion of the effect of various dairy operations up- 
on quality of dairy products. Open only to students taking Course 54. 
Prerequisite, Course 52. Two hours a week. 

57. Bacteriology. — Lectures and reference work upon various prob- 
lems relating to bacteria and soil fertility; discussion of ammonification, 
nitrification and denitrification in the soil; a consideration of symbiosis. 
Open only to students taking Course 55. Prerequisite, Course 53. Two 
hours a week. 



Primarily for graduates 



101-102. Bacteriology. — This is a laboratory course for students who 
desire to pursue some particular line of bacteriological investigation. 
Open only to students who have done considerable work in bacteriology. 
The kind of work and the time will be arranged to suit individual stu- 
dents. 



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COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 

Professor Merrill; Mr. Patterson 
For undergraduates only 

1. Biochemistry. — Lectures and recitations on the composition of 
the plant; the source, nature and assimilation of plant food; fermen- 
tation, its nature, effects, and control. Two hours a week. 

2. Biochemistry. — A continuation of Course 1. The composition 
of the animal body and of food materials ; the adaptation of food to ani- 
mal requirements ; the chemical changes involved in the digestion and 
assimilation of foods; respiration; absorption and liberation of energy. 
Class room, three hours a week; laboratory, Iff our hours a week. 

3. Economic Geology. — A course in applied geology, including a 
general survey of our mineral resources, with special reference to the 
mineral fuels ; the distribution and manner of occurrence of the more 
useful metals; the economically important nonmetallic minerals; and a 
study of the rocks and their uses as building stone, as road material, 
and as sources of lime and cement. Two hours a week. 

5. Geology. — A study of the earth's history and development, with 
especial attention to dynamical, structural, and physiographical geology. 
Three hours a week. 

6. Agricultural Chemistry. — This course includes a study of the 
origin and composition of soils; the source and composition of fertiliz- 
ing materials; the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen; the composition of 
insecticides and fungicides; the chemistry of milk and other dairy pro- 
ducts. Prerequisite, Course 1. Two hours a week. 

7. Biochemistry. — An abridged course, including a study of the 
proteins, fats, and carbolrydrates, the digestive enzymes and processes, 
the tissues and secretions of the body. Class room, three hours a week; 
laboratory, "ffour hours a week. 

8. Food Analysis. — A brief introduction to quantitative analysis, 
with laboratory practice in the analysis of foods; lectures on food 



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UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



adulteration and methods for its detection. Class room, one hour * 
week; laboratory, fsix hours a week. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

51. Biochemistry. — Lectures and recitations on the composition of 
the plant; the source, nature, and assimilation of plant food; the compo- 
sition of the animal body and of food materials ; the adaptation of food 
to the animal requirements ; the chemical changes involved in the diges- 
tion and assimilation of foods; respiration; absorption and liberation of 
energy; general metabolism; the chemical processes and methods of in- 
vestigation by which these subjects are studied. Prerequisite, Chemistry 
52. Five hours a week. 

52. Laboratory Biochemistry. — A study of the carbohydrates, fats, 
and protein bodies ; the digestive enzymes ; the blood muscles, bones, 
and other tissues of the body; milk, bile, and other secretions. A con- 
tinuation of the preceeding course. fFour hours a week. 

60. Agricultural Analysis. — A course in the qualitative and quan- 
titave analysis of fodders, fertilizers, milk, butter, and other dairy pro- 
ducts. The course is designed for students desiring to take up experi- 
ment station and inspection work. Prerequisites, Chemistry 53 and 60. 
"fTen hours a week. 

BIOLOGY 

The courses in this department are described under the College of 
Arts and Sciences. 

FARM MANAGEMENT AND AGRICULTURAL ENGI- 
NEERING 

Professor Simmons; Mr. Sink 
For undergraduates only 

2. Farm Accounting, (a) Farm Mathematics. — Instruction in this 
subject consists in the application of its principles to all kinds of farm 



90 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



problems where measurements of material, extension, capacity, etc., are 
required. 

(b) Farm Records and Accounts. — A system of records of the 
various operations of the farm, such as records of field labor, crop yields, 
milk production in the dairy, etc. ; a system of accounts showing the 
receipts and expenditures of the farm. \Four hours a week. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

71. Agricultural Engineering and Rural Architecture. 

(a) Agricultural Engineering. — Farm surveying and leveling; the 
plotting of farms and measurements of land; a study of drainage; esti- 
mating the investment and returns from a system of drainage; the mak- 
ing of roads; road materials. 

(b) Rural Architecture. — The planning, designing, location, and 
construction of farm buildings, water systems, sewerage, and concrete con- 
struction. Class room, two hours a week; laboratory, * three hours a 
week. 

72. Farm Mechanics and Machinery, (a) Farm Mechanics. — 
A study of the simpler laws of mechanics as applied to farm implements 
and farm machinery. 

(b) Farm Machinery.— A study of machinery used on the farm, 
farm power, etc. Demonstrations and tests are made with various 
machines and implements. Class room, two hours a week; laboratory, 
*three hours a week. 

73. History and Economics of Agriculture, (a) History of 
Agriculture. — A history of agriculture from early times to the present 
day; the beginning of British agriculture, and the development of mod- 
ern agriculture; the agriculture of the United States, its influence on 
social conditions; the importance of our leading products, and their 
effect on the world's commercial life; the agriculture of different sec- 
tions ; the development of farm machinery ; progress in agricultural ed- 
ucation. Lectures supplemented by illustrative material and slides. 

(b) Economics. — The factors of agricultural production, and their 
economic properties; organization of the farm; rent of farm land and 
the law of diminishing returns from the land; systems of distribution; 



91 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



a study of life in the rural communities; schools and other rural organi- 
zations. Class room, two hours a week; laboratory, "ftwo hours a week. 

74. Farm Management. — A study of the various types of farming, 
with comparison of investment and returns from each. A study will 
be made of the conditions under which extensive, intensive, and mixed 
systems of farming prosper or fail; laying out of fields and rotations of 
crops ; investigation of cost of different farming operations ; management 
of men and teams ; markets and marketing. Farm surveys, with a de- 
tailed study of the conditions on different farms, will be made. Farm 
plans will be outlined to suit various conditions. Class room, two hours 
a week; laboratory. * three hours a week. 

FORESTRY 

Professor Briscoe; Associate Professor Eaton 

1. Economics of Forestry. — The importance and scope of the sub- 
ject; the influence of forests on the conservation and distribution of 
water; influence on soils, topography, and public health; the relation to 
agriculture; stock raising, mining, railroads, manufactures, and industries 
in general; the character, extent and distribution of forest resources, 
national, state, and private. Required of all freshmen majoring in forest- 
ry, and open to all students. Two hours a week. 

2. Woodlot Forestry. — The general principles of forestry, with 
special application to the farm woodlots in this region. Lectures and 
text-book work in elementary systems of cutting, reforesting, protection, 
and estimating. Open to all students. Two hours a week. 

3. Wood Identification and Uses. — The identification and classifi- 
cation of the economic woods of the United States, based on simple lens 
inspection ; the technical qualities of various species, and their uses in 
the arts and trades ; their commercial production. Two hours a week. 

4. Wood Preservation. — Durability and seasoning of native woods; 
preservatives in commercial use; methods of operation and equipment of 
preserving plants. Special attention given to ties, posts, poles, paving- 
blocks, and timbers. Second half of semester. Two hours a week. 



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COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



5. History of Forestry. — The development of forestry in European 
countries and in the United States. Second half of semester. Two hours 
a week. 

6. Forest Mensuration. — Continuation of study of estimating meth- 
ods taken up in Course 11; study of age, growth, yield, and taper; 
form factors and volume tables. Two hours a week. 

8. Forest Mensuration Field Work. — To be taken in connection 
with Course 6. Use of instruments, scaling, and estimating. *Six 
hours a week. 

9. Forest Products. — Dealing with forest products other than logs 
and lumber, such as pulp wood, veneers, shingles, lath, tight and slack 
cooperage, hoops and headings, excelsior, vehicle woods, box-boards, 
spool stock, turpentine, tanin, gums, syrups, dye woods, and charcoal; 
methods of utilization, markets and values. First half of semester. 
Two hours a week. 

10. Forest Protection. — Systems of fire protection practiced by the 
federal government, state governments, and individuals or associations ; 
protection against atmospheric agencies, insect damages, grazing and 
animals, parasite plants and weeds. One hour a week. 

11. Forest Mensuration. — Lectures and recitations. Instructions in 
the theory and application of forest measurements. Calculations and 
computations from data obtained in the field work. Two hours a week. 

12. Practice of Forestry. — Applied systems of silviculture and 
management considered in relation to the commercially important species 
and types of forest in the United States ; discussions of management 
as practiced in Europe, and the adaptation of these systems to conditions 
in this country. Open to forestry seniors only. Two hours a week. 

13. Forest Mensuration Field Work. — To be taken in connection 
with Course 11. Collection of data for the study of age, growth, yield, 
taper, and volume; determination of form factors; survey and forest 
map of an assigned tract. *Six hours a week. 

14. Forest Management. — Construction of a working plan for a 
large area of forest land; map making, timber estimating, and growth 



93 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



studies, in connection with plans for the same. Open to seniors only. 
*Six hours a week. 

15. Silviculture. — A study of the factors concerning forest growth 
and the relation of trees to external environment; study of the forest as 
a whole; characteristics of the forest and of forest regions of the United 
States. Prerequisites, Biology 61, 62, 67, and 68. Two hours a week. 

16. Silviculture. — Cultural measures in the forest; thinnings, cut- 
tings, methods of reproduction both natural and artificial; planting. 
Two hours a week. 

17. Silviculture Field Work. — Special studies and practical work 
in the forest; preparation of a type map and detailed reports on silvi- 
cultural problems. To be taken in connection with Course 15. *Six 
hours a week. 

18. Nursery Practice. — To be taken in connection with Course 16. 
Tests of the germinating qualities of seeds of forest trees and a study of 
seedlings ; problems in planting and practical work in the State Forest 
Nursery; practice in field planting. *Six hours a week. 

19. Lumbering. — The lumber industry in the United States con- 
sidered from the economic standpoint; an account of the methods of 
logging and manufacture in different regions. Text books and lectures. 
Two hours a week. 

20. Forest Finance. — Business principles applied to forest manage- 
ment. The theory of the normal forest; calculations for sustained yield 
and continuous revenue. Lectures, recitations, and problems. Two hours 
a week. 

21. Lumbering Field Work. — To be taken with Course 19. Inspec- 
tion of lumber and pulp mills in the vicinity, during the first half of the 
semester. Inspection, detailed study, and report of an assigned operation. 
In this work the student is expected to spend at least six ten-hour days 
actual work on a lumbering job in the woods. *Six hours a week. 

22. Current Forestry Literature. — A continuation of Course 23. 
One hour a week. 



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COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



23. Current Forestry Literature. — Reviews of periodicals and cur- 
rent forestry literature; preparation of a card index under subject and 
author headings. Forestry seniors only. One hour a zveek. 

24. Forest Policy. — National and state forest policy and adminis- 
tration ; relation of government, corporations and individuals in regard 
to forest policies and applied forest management. Forestry seniors 
only. Second half of semester. Two hours a zveek. 

25, 26. Thesis. — Credit of from 2 to 6 hours will be allowed stu- 
dents desiring to elect thesis work in forestry. Work on original 
problems and investigations may be undertaken with the approval of the 
department. Time to be arranged. 

28. Forestry Laws. — Laws of the federal government and of the 
several states concerning forests and forestry. Given in 1916-17 and 
alternate years. Two hours a week. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Professor Freeman; Assistant Professor Whitcomb; Miss Knight; 

Miss McGinnis 

For undergraduates only 

1, 2. Textiles and Clothing. — A study of fibers and fabrics from a 
historic, economic, and social standpoint. The laboratory work consists 
of the making of plain garments, involving drafting and design, and selec- 
tion of materials. Class room, one hour a week ; laboratory, ffour hours. 

3, 4. Design and Color. — The object is to develop the appreciation of 
harmony of line, space, and color. Class room, one hour a week; lab- 
oratory, Jftwo hours a week. 

5, 6. Foods. — A study of food composition, cost, and the principles 
involved in preparation. The laboratory work consists in the preparation 
of the various types of foods. Prerequisites, Chemistry 1 or 3, 5, 2 or 4, 
and 6. Class room, two hours a week; laboratory, ffour hours a week 

7. Dress. — Economics, hygiene, design, and color are studied in 
their relation to dress. The laboratory work consists in designing and 

95 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



drafting of pattern, selection of materials, and the making of dressei. 
Prerequisites, Courses 1, 2, 3, and 4. Class room, two hours a week; 
laboratory, if our hours a week. 

8. Dress. — A continuation of Course 7. Laboratory, isix hours a 
week. 

9. Sanitation. — The situation of the house regarding general sur- 
roundings ; sanitary conditions in and around the house, ventilation, 
water supply, heating, and plumbing; the householder's interest in pub- 
lic sanitation and hygiene. Prerequisites, Bacteriology 1 and 3. Class 
room, three hours a week. 

10. Dietetics. — The chemical, economic, and physiological prin- 
ciples of human nutrition are studied. Prerequisites, Courses 5 and 6, 
and Biochemistry 7. Class room, three hours a week; laboratory, if our 
hours a week. 

11. Foods. — Problems in the preparation and serving of foods. A 
continuation of courses 5 and 6. Class room, one hour a week; labora- 
tory, if our hours a week. 

12. Household Management. — A study of economic and social prin- 
ciples of the household; organization of the household; division of in- 
come, labor, household processes ; care of the household. Open to 
seniors. Class room, three hours a week; laboratory, itwo hours a week. 

13. Handwork. — Historical and social development of textile in- 
dustry from primitive man to modern times. Prerequisites, Courses 1 
and 2. Laboratory, if our hours a week. 

14. Nursing. — Personal hygiene; the practical application of bac- 
teriology and physiology in health and disease; the care of the baby; 
first aid to the injured. Prerequisites, Bacteriology 1 and 3, and Biology 

5. Two hours a week. 

16. Teachers' Course. — Methods of presenting the work and its 
correlation with other subjects. Practice in planning courses of study 
and equipment. Open to seniors. Three hours a week. 



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COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

17. House Construction and Furnishing. — The evolution of 
the house, of house furnishings, their color, design, and cost. The labora- 
tory work consists in the planning of the house, making plans and esti- 
mates for house furnishings, and visiting shops. Also the designing 
and making of accessories in furnishing and decorating the house. Pre- 
requisites, Courses 1, 2, 3, and 4. Class room, one hour a week; labor- 
atory, if our hours a week. 

18. House Construction 4 , and Furnishing. — A continuation of 
Course 7. Class room, one hour a week; laboratory, if our hours a week. 
school. 

19. 20. Thesis. — Different phases of home economics. Individual 
problems. Open to seniors. Two to four hours a week. 

HORTICULTURE 

Professor Brown; Assistant Professor Sweetser; Mr. Muller 

For undergraduates only 

1. Commercial Pomology. — A course in methods of picking, grad- 
ing, packing, storing, and marketing fruit. The laboratory work of 
this course will acquaint the student with the more important varieties 
of fruit in this State. Class room, two hours a week; laboratory, "ftwo 
hours a week. 

2. Practical Pomology. — A study of orchard sites and soils, methods 
of propagating, setting, cultivating, fertilizing, pruning, and spraying. 
Class room, two hours a week; laboratory, *three hours a week. 

3. Systematic Pomology. — A systematic study of the types and 
varieties of the leading groups of fruits, their evolution and adaptation to 
environment; also distribution of varieties in the State. Prerequisites, 
Courses 1 and 2. Class room, two hours a week; laboratory, -ftwo hours 
a week. 

4. Vegetable Gardening. — A course in practical vegetable garden- 
ing; grading, marketing, and storing of vegetables, including the system- 



97 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



atic study of varieties and types for home and commercial use. Class 
room, two hours a week; laboratory, if two hours a week. 

5. Landscape Gardening. — A study of the principles of landscape 
art and of the materials used in making landscape pictures. Special at- 
tention is given to the improvement of the home grounds. Class room, 
two hours a week; laboratory, "\two hours a week. 

7. General Floriculture. — A study of the culture, propagation, 
management, and care of flowers for commercial purposes. Methods 
of producing, shipping, marketing, and designing, will be considered. 
Class room, two hours a week; laboratory, "ftwo hours a week. 

8. Greenhouse Construction. — A study of the various types of 
greenhouses and the methods of construction. Estimates and plans are 
made for houses suitable for conservatories, private estates, and com- 
mercial floriculture. Cost and methods of installing heating systems, 
show rooms, and storage houses are also considered. Class room, two 
hours a week; laboratory, "ftwo hours a week. 

9. Small Fruit Culture. — A study of the bush and vine fruits, 
including strawberries; adapted varieties; methods of propagation, cul- 
ture, harvesting, and marketing. Class room, two hours a week; labora- 
tory, -ftwo hours a week. 

10. Plant Breeding. — A course in plant breeding, as applied to 
variation, selection, and hybridization, adapted to garden and fruit crops. 
Prerequisite, Biology 3. Two hours a week. 

11. 12. Thesis. — Three hours a week. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

51. Seminar. — Preparation and discussion of papers dealing with 
the recent problems and experiments in horticulture. Required of stu- 
dents taking major work in Horticulture. Prerequisites, Courses 1 and 
2. One hour a week. 

52. Seminar. — A continuation of Course 51. Requirements and 
prerequisites the same. One hour a week. 



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COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



54. Floriculture. — A course designed to give practical knowledge 
of the propagation and culture of annuals, herbaceous perennials, bulbs, 
roses, bedding plants, and other garden plants, with especial reference 
to care of public parks and private estates. Class room, two hours a 
week; laboratory, 1[two hours a week. 

55. Fruits and Vegetables Under Glass. — A study of the various 
fruits and vegetables that are grown under glass. A course suited to 
the needs of either commercial work or private estates. Prerequisites, 
Course 1. Class room, two hours a week. 

56. Plant Disease Control. — A course designed to acquaint the 
student with the various kinds and types of spray machinery, and with 
the preparation and application of the various sprays used in disease 
control. Prerequisites, Courses 1 and 2. Class room, one hour a week; 
laboratory, iftwo hours a week. 



99 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



FACULTY OF INSTRUCTION 

James Stacy Stevens, M. S., LL. D. Professor of Physics 

Dean 
Lucius Herbert Merrill, Sc. D. Professor of Biological Chemistry 

James Norris Hart, C. E., M. S., Sc. D. 

Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy 
John Homer Huddilston, Ph. D. 

Professor of Greek and Classical Archeology 
Ralph Kneeland Jones, B. S. Librarian 

Jacob Bernard Segall, Ph. D. Professor of French 

George Davis Chase, Ph. D. Professor of Latin 

Caroline Colvin, Ph. D. Professor of History 

Wallace Craig, Ph. D. Professor of Philosophy 

Roland Palmer Gray, A. M. Professor of English 

Garrett William Thompson, Ph. D. Professor of German 

Guy Andrew Thompson, Ph. D. Professor of English Literature 

Windsor Pratt Daggett, Ph. B. Professor of Public Speaking 

Mintin Asbury Chrysler, Ph. D. Professor of Biology 

George Ware Stephens, Ph. D. Professor of Economics and Sociology 
Andrew Paul Raggio, Ph. D. Professor of Spanish and Italian 

Roy Franklin Richardson, Ph. D. Professor of Education 

Charles Wilson Easley, Ph. D. Professor of Chemistry 

Leon Elmer Woodman, Ph. D. Associate Professor of Physics 

Harley Richard Willard, Ph. D. Associate Professor of Mathematics 
Alice Middleton Boring, Ph. D. Associate Professor of Zoology 

James McCluer Matthews, A. M. 

Associate Professor of Economics and Sociology 
Daniel Wilson Pearce, A. M. Associate Professor of Education 

Robert Rutherford Drummond, Ph. D. Associate Professor of German 
Truman Leigh Hamlin, M. A. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 



100 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Harry Newton Conser, M. S., M. 
Lloyd Meeks Burghart, M. A. 
Albert Guy Durgin, M. S. 
Lowell Jacob Reed, M. S. 
Ralph Maynard Holmes, M. A. 
Joseph Newell Stephenson, M. S. 
Burnett Olcott McAnney, A. B., 



A. Assistant Professor of Botany 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Assistant Professor of Physics 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B. Lit. 

Assistant Professor of English 
Assistant Professor of French 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 



Francois Joseph Kueny, L es L. 
John Willard Kimball, Ph. D. 
William Samuel Krebs, M. A. 

Assistant Professor of Economics and Sociology 
Warren Whittemore Reed, A. M. Assistant Professor of English 

Adelbert Wells Sprague, A. M. Director of Music 

Raymond Floyd, B. A. Instructor in German 

Sidney Winfield Patterson, B. S. 

Instructor in Agricultural and Biological Chemistry 



Harry Gilbert Mitchell, A. M. 
Roscoe Woods, M. A. 
Harry Chamberlain Brown, B. S. 
Chester Hamlin Goldsmith, B. S. 
Myer Segal, A. M. 
Thomas William Sheehan, M. A. 
Albert Ames Whitmore, B. S. 
Henry Vigor Cranston, B. S. 
Margaret June Kelley, B. A. 
Abraham Strauss, B. Sc. 
John Leonard Roberts, A. B. 
Paul Henry Axtell, A. B. 
Edwin Knight Buttolph, A. M. 
Raymond von Dersmith Gable, A. M. 
Robert Orland Hutchinson, A. B. 
Marshall Miller, Ch. E. 
Anton Adolph Raven, Jr., A. B. 
Charles Bunsen Shaw, A. M. 
Lester Frank Weeks, B. S. 
Percy Barnette Wiltberger, M. Sc. 
Norbert Wiener, Ph. D. 
Ava Harriet Chadbourne, B. A. 
Donald Vince Atwater, B. S. 



Instructor in Chemistry 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Instructor in Physics 

Instructor in Chemistry 

Instructor in German 

Instructor in English 

Instructor in History 

Instructor in Public Speaking 

Instructor in German* 

Instructor in Botany 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Instructor in English 

Instructor in Spanish 

Instructor in Spanish and Italian 

Instructor in Physics 

Instructor in Chemistry 

Instructor in English 

Instructor in English 

Instructor in Chemistry 

Instructor in Entomology 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Assistant in Education 

Assistant in Biology 



101 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

The College of Arts and Sciences offers a course of liberal training 
equivalent to that of the standard New England college. It designs 
particularly to meet the needs of three classes of students : 

1. Men and women who desire to pursue a cultural college course. 

2. Men and women who desire to enter professional schools. 

3. Men and women who plan to fit themselves for the profession of 
teachers in secondary schools, or for school superintendencies. 

ADMISSION 

The requirements for admission are given in full on pages 44-60. 
They are practically the same as for other New England colleges and 
may be met by a four-year preparatory course in a good high school or 
academy. 

FRESHMAN STUDIES 

The character of the work of the first year is conditioned somewhat 
upon the subjects offered for admission. 

It is recommended that all students in this college register for as 
much of the required work as practicable in their freshman year, and 
they are expected to complete the whole of this work by the end of 
their sophomore year. 

MAJOR SUBJECT 

During the freshman year the student does not select a major sub- 
ject and the registration is largely prescribed. 

Beginning with the sophomore year each student must select, in some 
one department, work to be pursued three or four years, on the average 
of five recitations a week. Any one of the following departments may 
be chosen for major work: Biology, (including Zoology, Botany, Physi- 
ology, and Entomology), Chemistry, Economics and Sociology, Educa- 
tion, English, French, German, Greek and Classical Archeology, His- 
tory, Latin, Mathematics and Astronomy, Philosophy, Physics, Spanish 
and Italian. 



102 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



The major subject must include work counting not less than thirty 
nor more than forty hours. In the case of departments in which less 
work is offered than amounts to thirty hours, this must be made up from 
such other related departments as the professor under whose direction 
the major subject is taken may prescribe. The remainder of the student's 
work may be selected from any department or departments of the uni- 
versity. This must be done with the approval of the head of the de- 
partment in which the student has chosen his major subject and must bear 
some useful relation to his other work. 

The head of the department in which the student has chosen his 
major subject becomes his major instructor, and during the remainder of 
the course this instructor acts as chief adviser in all matters relating to 
the curriculum, and is the representative of the sudent before the faculty. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

The College of Arts and Sciences has the following graduation 
requirements : 

Every candidate for the Bachelor of Arts degree is required to com- 
plete the following amount of work in college: (a) eight hours pre- 
scribed in English; (b) ten or sixteen hours elected in Group 1, of which 
six or ten hours must be in foreign languages; (c) ten hours elected 
in Group 2; (d) ten hours elected in Group 3; (e) military science and 
tactics, two years, three hours a week; (f) physical training, one year, 
two hours a week. 

A student who enters college with a minimum of four units in for- 
eign languages is required to elect sixteen hours in Group 1, of which at 
least ten hours shall be in foreign languages. A student who enters 
with more than the minimum of four units credit is required to elect at 
least ten hours in Group 1, of which at least six hours shall be in for* 
eign language. 

1. Language Group. — This is composed of courses in language and 
literature, including all the courses offered in the departments of Eng- 
lish, Public Speaking, German, French, Spanish and Italian, and such 
courses offered by the departments of Greek and Latin as deal with the 
Greek and Latin languages and literatures, or presume some knowledge 
of these languages. 

2. Science and Mathematics Group. — This is composed of the 
courses offered in mathematics and the biological and physical sciences, 



103 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

including all the courses offered by the Departments of Mathematics, 
Biology, Chemistry, Biological Chemistry, and Physics. 

3. Social Science Group. — This is composed of the courses offered 
in the Departments of History, Economics and Sociology, Philosophy, 
Education ; and the courses in Bibliography, History, Archeology, Fine 
Arts, Music, and Biblical Literature offered in other departments and not 
included in the first group. 

4. Military Science and Tactics, two years, three hours a week. 

5. Physical Training, one year, three hours a week. 

GENERAL LECTURE COURSE 

A course of weekly lectures is given in the College of Arts and 
Sciences each semester. Attendance is open to all, and credit is granted 
when the course is completed. This year, the lectures will be in charge 
of the Departments of History and Economics and Sociology in the 
fall semester, and the Departments of Mathematics and Physics in the 
spring semester. 

INFORMATION CLUB 

This is a club composed of students in the College of Arts and 
Sciences who are willing to spend an hour a week in the discussion of 
some topic of general interest. Leaders are selected from the faculty of 
this college. The attendance is voluntary and no credit is given for this 
work. 

PROGRAM FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS 
LEADING TO A STATE CERTIFICATE 

The College of Arts and Sciences of the University of Maine has 
arranged a program for the professional training of secondary school 
teachers, which will entitle those who complete it to a professional state 
certificate for secondary school teachers. The program has been ar- 
ranged in conference with the State Superintendent of Public Schools 
and has his endorsement. 



104 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



In addition to fulfilling the general requirements leading to the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts, the student is expected to complete six hours 
in Psychology in the sophomore year as a prerequisite to twelve hours 
work in Education in the junior and senior years, thirty hours in a major 
subject, and from ten to twenty hours in a minor subject. The prescribed 
work in Education includes three hours in the History of Education, three 
hours in the Principles of Secondary Education, three hours in Technique 
of Teaching, and three hours to be elected from the three following sub- 
jects: Adolescence, Pedagogy and Psychology of High School Subjects, 
and Practice Teaching. 

The selection of a major subject to which the student devotes 30 hours 
and a minor subject to which he devotes from 10 to 20 hours is designed 
to equip him for teaching two subjects related to high school. Usual com- 
binations of high school subjects are English and history, Latin and 
history, English and Latin, Latin and modern languages, mathematics 
and physics, physics and chemistry. For the completion of this course 
a high standard of scholarship is required. All the prescribed work 
must be of "C" grade or above. Upon completing this course the stu- 
dent will receive a Professional Secondary Certificate from the State De- 
partment of Public Instruction which will designate the major and minor 
subjects which he has pursued. A special certificate will also be issued 
by the university which will give a detailed outline of the student's 
record. 



BACHELOR OF ARTS CURRICULA 

The work in the College of Arts and Sciences leads to the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts (B. A.). The curricula demand 125 hours and are 
regularly completed in four years, but a student of exceptional prepara- 
tion and application may complete the requirements in three years by 
attending one or more summer terms. Students fitting themselves for 
professional or technical schools are often encouraged to do this, but 
prospective teachers are recommended to spend four years in college. 

No outlines of the curricula in the College of Arts and Sciences are 
given in the catalog, but students may have an outline presented to 
them by applying to the professor in charge of the department in 
which they are interested. Groups of studies may be made up which 
would be desirable for students intending to prepare for teaching, or 
to enter upon the study of law, medecine, or theology. 



105 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



In this college, 95 out of the 125 required hours must be made with 
a grade of C or above. 

BACHELOR OF PEDAGOGY CURRICULA 

Graduates of the Maine normal schools who have completed a course 
in a Class A high school, and who have had one year of successful 
experience in teaching, are admitted to the university as candidates for 
the degree of Bachelor of Pedagogy. Such students are required to 
complete, with high grade, seventy-five semester hours, of which twelve 
shall be in the Department of Education, and a sufficient number of the 
remaining hours shall be devoted to some one department to give them * 
satisfactory equipment for high school teaching. 

\ CURRICULUM IN JOURNALISM 

The university maintains a Curriculum in Journalism, which extends 
over four years and includes the following subjects: 

Freshman year, English, French, German, or Spanish; Science — 
Physics, or Chemistry, or Biology; English, 18th and 19th Century Prose; 
Bibliography; History and Government; Military and Physical Training. 
Sophomore year, Elements of Economics, Elements of Politics, Money 
and Banking; History of English Literature; English History, Ameri- 
can History, Medieval History; Science; Victorian Literature; Military 
and Physical Training. Junior year, Commerce, European Governments; 
Democracy; History of the United States; History of American Litera- 
ture; Shakespeare, or History of the English Drama; Journalism; Elec- 
tive, Science, or Language, or Philosophy, or Art, three hours. Senior 
year, Sociology, Social Pathology, American Government, Labor Prob- 
lems; Specialized Writing; Recent History; Literary Criticism; Journal- 
ism ; Elective, Language, Philosophy, History of Education, or Art, five 
hours. 

Students who complete this curriculum will receive the Bachelor of 
Arts degree for major work in English. 

COMBINED ARTS AND LAW CURRICULA 

Students who have completed the junior year in the College of Arts 
and Sciences are permitted to enter the College of Law and are given the 



106 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



degree of B. A. after one year, and LL. B. after two additional years' 
work. Such students are required to conform to the Arts requirements 
in English, modern languages, and science; to take 30 hours in the Social 
Science group; and to complete 15 hours in some definite subject. 

Students who can spend but two years in college before being ad- 
mitted to the College of Law should register as regular freshmen in the 
College of Arts and Sciences. Their work should include Latin, English, 
French or German, public speaking, brief writing, rhetoric, and perhaps 
courses in journalism. They should also study ancient and modern, 
European, English, and especially American history, as well as econ- 
omics, logic, and psychology, the latter in its relation to criminal law. 

COMBINED ARTS AND MEDICAL CURRICULA 

The marked increase in the number of pre-medical students in at- 
tendance at the university has led the departments concerned to establish 
definite programs of work for such students. For students who can- 
not spend more than a year in pre-medical work, a one-year course is 
provided which meets the entrance requirements of a number of medi- 
cal colleges, but prospective medical students are strongly recommended 
to spend at least two years in such work, not only because a better gen- 
eral education is thus possible, but because a pre-medical course of at 
least two years is rapidly becoming recognized as essential, a3 is shown 
by the fact that thirty-nine of the best medical colleges in this country 
require for admission two or more years of colle^ • work. By arrange- 
ment with certain medical colleges a student completing three years at 
this institution may enter the medical college, and receive his bachelor's 
degree here at the completion of his first year at the medical college. 

One-year Course 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Subject Hours Subject Hours 

General Biology 4 General Biology 4 

General Chemistry 4 General Chemistry 5 

General Physics 5 Laboratory Physics 2 

English 2 English 2 

German 3 German 2 

Elective 2 



107 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Two-year Course 



First Year 



Fall Semester 
Subject Hours 

General Biology 4 

General Chemistry 4 

English 2 

German (or French) 5 

Military 1 



Spring Semester 
Subject Hours 

General Biology 4 

General Chemistry 5 

English 2 

German (or French) 5 

Military _ 1 



Physical Training y 2 Physical Training _ 1 



Second Year 



Vertebrate Anatomy 4 

Qualitative Analysis 5 

General Physics 5 

Psychology (or Sci. Ger. 

2 hours) _ 3 

Military 1 



Animal Embryology 4 

Organic Chemistry 5 

Laboratory Physics 2 

Animal Histology 4 

Military 1 



Three-year Course 



First Year 



General Biology 4 

General Chemistry 4 

English 2 

German (or French) 5 

Military 1 



General Biology 4 

General Chemistry _ 5 

English 2 

German (or French) _ 5 

Military 1 



Physical Training J^ Physical Training 



1 



Second Year 



Vertebrate Anatomy 4 

Qualitative Analysis 5 

General Physics 5 

English 3 

Military 1 



Animal Embryology 4 

Organic Chemistry 5 

Laboratory Physics 2 

English 3 

Military 1 



108 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Third Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Subject Hours Subject Hours 

Animal Physiology 4 Animal Histology 4 

Genetics 2 Bacteriology 3 

Quantitative Analysis 4 Elective 2 

Scientific German 2 Scientific German 2 

Psychology 3 Social Psychology 2 

Sociology 3 Social Pathology 3 



109 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



Note: A star (*) before the time designated for a course indi- 
cates that three hours of actual work are required to obtain credit for 
one hour; a dagger (f) indicates that two hours are required to obtain 
this credit; a double dagger ($) indicates that two and one-half hours 
are required. 

Courses designated by an odd number are given in the fall semester; 
those designated by an even number, in the spring semester. 

ART 

Professor Huddilston 

Courses extending thru four semesters present an opportunity for 
the student to cover the entire field of ancient and medieval and modern 
art history in its various bearings on the history of Europe down to the 
close of the 18th century. When taken in succession all but the first 
course may be counted toward an advanced degree. 

Oriental, Greek, and Roman art will be given in a three-hour course 
occupying one year, and medieval and modern art will follow this for 
two semesters for the same number of periods. 

While it is not absolutely essential that a student should have taken 
Courses 1 and 56 in order to be admitted to 57 and 58, it is highly desira- 
ble that a sequence should be observed and that the historical evolution 
of the great art epochs should be approached in such a manner as to 
contribute the largest educational values. 

1. Art. — The history of art in ancient Egypt and western Asia, with 
special reference to the buildings of the Egyptians as exhibiting the 
best index to the history of that remarkable race. This chapter will be 
a foreword to the beginning of art in southeastern Europe; the Cretan 
and Mycenaean periods preceding the early Greek period. The history 
of Greek architecture and sculpture will be given down to the beginning 



no 






COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



of Athenian supremacy. The extant monuments will be studied in pho- 
tographs and with the aid of the stereopticon. Lectures, note-books, 
text-books, and discussions. Three hours a week. Given in 1916-17 and 
alternate years. 

3, 4. General Art History. — From the Greek age down to the time 
of the French Revolution. Main emphasis will be laid on the architec- 
ture and sculpture of the ancients and the painting of the Renaissance 
and later times. This course is intended for a rapid survey of the sub- 
ject and is presented with the idea of accommodating such students as 
can not afford the time required by the twelve semester hours involved 
in the other courses described in this department. Instruction will be 
given by lectures, with a text-book for occasional quiz. Two hours a 
week. 

56. Art. — Greek and Roman art in their broad relations to the life 
of classical times; the influence of art as a dominant force in Greece 
and the effects of Greek culture upon Rome; the passing of Greek art 
to Latin soil; the notable national monuments of Rome. The existing 
remains in the European museums as well as the monuments still in situ 
in Italy, Sicily, Greece, and Asia Minor will be gone over with the photo- 
graphs. 

Each student will be expected to acquire some ability in estimating 
the styles of the various epochs. Lectures. Three hours a week. Given 
in 1916-17 and alternate years. 

57. Medieval Art. — The history of art as influenced and modified 
by Christianity; Romanesque and Gothic in the West and North; the 
early centuries of painting in Italy and the influence of the fine arts in the 
14th and 15th centuries, particularly in Florence, Siena, Ravenna, Venice, 
and Rome; the spirit of the Renaissance in Italy, France, and Germany 
under the domination of Italy. Lectures, study of photographs, and in- 
vestigation of various topics. Three hours a week. Given in 1917-18 
and alternate years. 

58. Modern Art. — Art in the north of Europe and in Spain, partic- 
ularly the schools of painting and palace architecture in France. The 
age of Louis XIV reflected at Versailles and in the Louvre; the new 
importance of artists as international factors at Madrid, Paris, and Lon- 
don ; social evolution and contemporary history reflected in the successive 



111 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



schools of artists with the gradual ascendency of France until the time 
of the French Revolution. Lectures; study of pictures; special subjects 
for individual investigation. Three hours a week. Given in 1916-17 and 
alternate years. 

ASTRONOMY 

Professor Hart; Assistant Professor Reed; Mr. Roberts 

10. Descriptive Astronomy. — An elementary course. The text- 
book is supplemented by informal lectures, illustrated by lantern slides, 
drawings of celestial objects, and work in the observatory. Open to all 
students. Three hours a week. 

15, 16. General Astronomy. — Designed for general culture and for 
students in mathematics and physics. Recitations, lectures, solutions of 
problems, observations with instruments in the observatory. Open to 
sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have had Mathematics 1. Three 
hours a week. Given in 1917-18 and alternate years. 

57. Practical Astronomy. — A course arranged to meet the needs 
of engineering students, and consisting mainly of problems in the conver- 
sion of time, the determination of terrestial latitudes, and the establish- 
ment of meridian lines. The data for these problems are taken largely 
from the students' own observations, and the course is intended to em- 
phasize the necessity of careful work in the field, as well as accurate and 
well arranged computations. The instruments employed are the sextant, 
artificial horizon, portable chronometer, theodolite, vertical circle, as- 
tronomical transit, and zenith telescope. Open to students who have 
taken Mathematics 1, 3, 9, and Astronomy 10. Two hours of recitations 
or lectures and two hours of observatory work a week. 

59, 60. Practical Astronomy. — The theory and use of the sextant, 
universal instrument, zenith telescope, transit, and equatorial. Open to 
students who have taken Mathematics 6, 7, 8, and Astronomy 10, and, 
preferably, 57. Three hours a week. Given in 1916-17 and alternate 
years. 

62. History of Astronomy. — Lectures and recitations. Two hours 
a week. Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 



112 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Professor Jones 

2. Bibliography. — Origin of the alphabet; development of writing; 
inscriptions; manuscripts; invention of printing; early printed books; 
modern bookmaking; bookbinding and the care of books; library pro- 
cesses and aids; public documents; periodicals; libraries, ancient and 
modern. A lecture course, with collateral reading and reference work. 
One hour a week. 

Three lectures are given on The Library and its Uses; Classification 
and the Catalog; and reference Books and their Use. Required of all 
freshmen. 

BIOLOGY 

General Biology. — Course 1, General Zoology, together with Course 
2, General Botany, comprise a year's work in General Biology. After 
completing Courses 1 and 2 a student may specialize on either the botani- 
cal or the zoological side of Biology. The science requirement in the 
College of Arts and Sciences may be met by taking Courses 1, 2, and 7. 

1. General Zoology. — The fundamental principles of animal life, 
illustrated by examples from the principal groups, and including some 
work on the anatomy and physiology of higher animals. Required of 
students taking the Curricula in Agriculture and Forestry, and Pre-medi- 
cal work. Class-room, two hours a week; laboratory, if our hours a 
week. 

2. General Botany. — The fundamental principles of plant life, 
illustrated by examples from the various groups, with special attention 
to the seed plants. Required of students taking the Curricula in Agri- 
culture, Forestry, and Home Economics, and Pre-medical work. Pre- 
requisite, Course 1. Class-room, two hours a week; laboratory, \four 
hours a week. 

5. Elementary Physiology. — The anatomy, physiology, and hygiene 
of higher animals, especially applied to man. Required of students taking 
the Curriculum in Home Economics. Class-room, two hours a week; 
laboratory, if our hours a week. 



113 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



7. Principles of Breeding, or Genetics. — A general treatment of 
the facts that form the basis of our knowledge of inheritance. Pre- 
requisites, Courses 1 and 2. Two hours a week. 

8. Entomology. — A study of the structure, life-histories, and classi- 
fication of insects, illustrated by common farm and forest species; the 
special insect pests of farm, garden, orchard, and forest, and of domes- 
tic animals; methods of control. Some work on animal parasites other 
than insects is included. Prerequisites, Courses 1 and 2. Class-room, 
two hours a week; laboratory, if our hours a week. 

9. Plant Taxonomy and Histology. 10. Plant Physiology and 
Pathology. — A combined course for one year for students in Agricul- 
ture, consisting of : practice in the identification of the higher plants ; 
microscopic work on the cell, tissues, and organs of the higher plants; 
a study of the functions of plants, including nutrition, growth and 
response; a study of the diseases of plants, especially those caused by 
fungi. Prerequisites, Courses 1 and 2. Class-room, two hours a week; 
laboratory, isix hours a week. 

Note. Pharmaceutical botany is given in Courses 14 and 15, which 
are designed to meet the needs of students in Pharmacy, according to 
the syllabus of the National Committee. 

14. Elementary Botany. — The fundamentals of the subject. Re- 
quired of Two-year Pharmacy students. Class-room, one hour a 
week; laboratory, if our hours a week. 

15. Pharmaceutical Histology. — The technic of preparation and 
study of the tissues of the higher plants. Prerequisite, Course 14. 
Class-room, one hour a week; laboratory, Iff our hours a week. 

17. Wood Identification. — The identification of the various com- 
mercial woods by means of the unaided eye and the microscope. Open 
to students in Chemical Engineering, and to others by permission. iFour 
hours a week (counts one credit hour). Second half of fall semester. 

51. Vertebrate Anatomy. — A comparative study of the organ sys- 
tems of vertebrates, with the dissection of the dogfish and cat. Pre- 
requisites, Courses 1 and 2. Class room, two hours a zveek; laboratory, 
~ff our hours a week. 

114 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



52. Animal Embryology. — A study of the fundamental principles 
of development, and the formation of organ systems and tissues in verte- 
brates. Laboratory work on fish, frog, and chick. Prerequisite, Course 
51. Class-room, two hours a week; laboratory, if our hours a week. 

53. Advanced Animal Physiology. — A study of the activities of 
cells and organ systems, with experimental work on the muscles, nerves, 
circulation, etc., in frog and man. Prerequisite, Course 51. Class-room, 
two hours a week; laboratory, if our hours a week. 

54. Animal Histology. — A study of the structure of protoplasm 
cells, and tissues; practice in microscopical technique. Prerequisite, 
Course 51. Class-room, two hours a week; laboratory, if our hours a 
week. 

56. Vertebrate Anatomy. — A continuation of Course 51, for the 
dissection of other types, especially a bird and a reptile. Prerequisite, 
Course 51. Laboratory, if our to i eight hours a week. 

57, 58. Economic Entomology. — A further study of economic in- 
sects and entomological problems, varying according to the needs of 
the students. Prerequisite, Course 8. Laboratory, if our to ieight hours 
a week. 

61. Plant Histology. — The microscopic structure of the higher 
plants; the cell; the various tissues; the root, stem, leaf, and spore-bear- 
ing organs; the adaptations of plants to external conditions, considered 
from the standpoint of structure; killing, sectioning, staining, and mount- 
ing of plant tissues. Prerequisites, Courses 1 and 2. Class-room, two 
hours a week; laboratory, if our hours a week. 

62. Plant Physiology. — The plant is considered from the stand- 
point of its activities; absorption and transport of raw material; manu- 
facture, transport, and storage of food; growth; movement in response 
to stimuli. Prerequisite, Course 61. Class-room, two hours a week; 
laboratory, if our hours a week. 

63. Plant Taxonomy and Morphology. — The identification of seed- 
plants by the use of a manual; the structure and relationships of vas- 
cular plants from the evolutionary standpoint. Prerequisite, Course 61. 



115 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Class-room, field and laboratory work; time to be arranged, giving four 
units. 

64. Plant Ecology. — Presents briefly two aspects of the subject: 
(1) physiographic ecology studied in the field as far as the season 
permits ; (2) structural ecology, viz., the histological features char- 
acteristic of plants growing in extreme habitats, and of those having 
special modes of nutrition. Prerequisites, Course 9 or 61. Class-room, 
one hour a week; laboratory, if our hours a week. Given in 1917-18 
and alternate years. 

66. Plant Pathology. — The diseases of plants, especially those 
caused by fungi; destruction of timber by fungi; methods of combating 
plant diseases. Prerequisite, Course 61. Class-room, two hours a week; 
laboratory, "ftwo hours a week. Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 

67, 68. Forest Botany. — A systematic study of the trees of North 
America. Class-room, two hours a week; laboratory, ffour hours a 
week. Prerequisites, Courses 1 and 2. 

71, 72. Seminar. — Preparation and discussion of papers dealing 
with recent advances in zoology and botany. Open to seniors and grad- 
uate students. One hour a week. 

73, 74. Thesis. — Students in the College of Agriculture specializing 
in biology may prepare a thesis on some subject approved by the head 
of the department. Time varies. 

75, 76. Advanced Zoology. — This course offers an opportunity for 
special zoological work along lines suited to the future plans of the 
student. It may consist of field work, laboratory work, or reading, or a 
combination of all three. In general each student is given a problem for 
investigation and encouraged to devise methods for its solution. The 
time varies and the work may be continued a number of semesters. 

77, 78. Advanced Botany. — This course offers an opportunity for 
special work in botany along the lines best suited to the future plans of 
the student. It may consist of laboratory work, field work, or reading, 
or a combination of all three. Courses which have recently been given 
under this caption include: morphology of pteridophytes ; structure 



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and technology of woods; structural and physiographic ecology; ad- 
vanced plant physiology; special problems assigned to individuals. The 
time varies and the work may be continued a number of semesters. 



CHEMISTRY 

The courses in this department are described under the 
College of Technology 



ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY 

Professor Stephens; Associate Professor Matthews; 
Assistant Professor Krebs 

For undergraduates only 

la. Elements of Economics. — An introductory course dealing with 
the general principles and problems of modern economic activity, pro- 
duction, distribution, and consumption; value, commerce, labor prob- 
lems, and various other topics in this field of study. Three hours a week. 

lb. Elements of Economics. — In general, similar to la, but abbre- 
viated and modified to meet the needs of technical and agricultural 
students. Two hours a week. 

2sl. Money and Banking. — A course introductory to the study of 
money, banking, and finance. The history of currency and banking in 
the United States and other leading countries of the world. Three hours 
a week. 

2b. Money and Banking. — Essentially similar to 2a, but planned 
especially for students in the Colleges of Technology and Agriculture. 
Two hours a week. 

3. Elements of Politics. — An introductory course dealing with the 
basic principles of government, nature of the state, sovereignty, liberty, 
governmental structures, political parties. Two hours a week. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



6. Business Law. — The legal principles of modern business; con- 
tracts, agency, corporations, partnerships, bailments, guaranty, insurance. 
This course is intended primarily for seniors. Three hours a week. 

9, 10. Accounting. — Principles and conventions of single and double 
entry bookkeeping; the keeping of accounts of mercantile, industrial, 
and financial business; the construction and interpretation of corporation 
accounts, balance sheets, and income statements; auditing, cost finding, 
depreciation, and the accountancy of investments. Lectures, discussion, 
and laboratory practice. Three hours a week. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

52. Public Finance. — Various systems for the collection of public 
revenue in America and Europe; governmental budgets; taxation, — in- 
cidence and shifting, general property, customs and excises, mortgage, 
insurance, income, inheritance, corporation, single tax. Three hours a 

week. 

55. General Sociology. — The principles underlying normal social 
processes and relations; societal development and selection. Three hours 
a week. 

56. Social Pathology. — The dependent, defective, and delinquent 
classes; their causes, magnitude, methods of prevention, and ameliora- 
tion. Three hours a week. 

57. Corporation Finance. — The promotion, financiering, incorpora- 
tion, and capitalization of industrial and public utility corporations in 
the United States ; their organization and securities, relations of stock- 
holders and directors; analysis of reports; stock speculation; receiver- 
ships and reorganizations ; methods of consolidation. Two hours a week. 

59. Insurance. — The relations of insurance and risk to modern 
business organization; the principles of life, fire, marine, and other forms 
of property insurance ; types of policies ; rate making ; types of company 
organization; investments of insurance companies; insurance compe- 
tition. Three hours a week. 



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60. Public Utilities. — Municipal utilities in the United States and 
Europe; their economic, social, and legal principles and problems; regu- 
lation by commission; public and private ownership. Two hours a week. 
Given in 1917-18 and alternate years. 

63. Governments of Europe. — A comparative study of the modern 
governments of the principal countries of Europe; party development and 
current problems national and local. Three hours a week. Given in 
1917-18 and alternate years. 

66. Municipal Government. — The forms of government and the 
principal problems of American and European cities; recent movements 
for social and civic betterment. Two hours a week. Given in 1917-18 
and alternate years. 

68. American Government. — The principles and interpretation of 
the American federal, state, and local governments; the study of Amer- 
ican problems and the growth of political parties. Three hours a week. 
Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 

71. Labor Problems. — The evolution of organized labor; present- 
day industrial problems of trade unions, woman and child labor, immi- 
gration, employers' associations, agencies of industrial peace. Three 
hours a week. Given in 1917-18 and alternate years. 

74. Transportation; — The historical development of transporta- 
tion in the United States; railway organization, financing, rate-making; 
public regulation and ownership of railroads in leading European coun- 
tries ; federal and state legislation and regulation. Three hours a week. 
Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 

75. Business Organization. — The origin and development of the 
corporation; significance of large-scale enterprise; the economic and 
legal aspects of business combinations; governmental regulation. Three 
hours a week. Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 

76. Business Management. — The methods of business; system; 
efficiency; cost accounting; principles of buying and selling. Three 
hours a week. Given in 1917-18 and alternate years. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



79. International Law. — The nature, sources, evolution, and re- 
cent modification of international law; significance of the Great War; 
the position and influence of the United States. Three hours a week. 
Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 

82. Rural Sociology. — The social factors affecting country life; 
the economics of farming; rural co-operative organizations; the move- 
ment for the improvement of rural life. Two hours a week. Given in 
1916-17 and alternate years. 

85. American Commerce. — American commercial relations with 
foreign countries; the development of foreign trade; the problems and 
methods of international business. Spanish America is treated the 
first half-year. Two hours a week. 

86. American Commerce. — A continuation of Course 85, with em- 
phasis on American trade relations with the countries of Europe and the 
Far East. Two hours a week. 

89. American Diplomacy. — A review of a century of American 
diplomatic relations; famous treaties and prominent men and adminis- 
trations connected with such negotiations. Pan-American diplomacy 
constitutes the subject of study the first semester. Two hours a week. 
Given in 1917-18 and alternate years. 

90. American Diplomacy. — A continuation of Course 89, chief 
attention being given to diplomatic relations with the countries of Europe 
and the Orient. Two hours a week. Given in 1917-18 and alternate 
years. 

93. The Family. — An historical consideration of the origin and 
development of the family; the legal and economic relations of its 
members; its significance as an institution; its pathological manifesta- 
tions. Two hours a week. Given in 1917-18 and alternate years. 

Primarily for Graduates 

102. Economic Theory. — A critical study of modern theories of 
wealth and its distribution; the contributions to theory of the classical, 
historical, and Austrian schools; current writers. Two hours a week. 



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107, 108. Seminar in American Government. — Given at the option 
of the instructor to a limited number of students who have shown 
special ability in the study of American government. Two hours a week. 

109, 110. Seminar in Economics. — Extended original investigation 
upon some specific topic to be selected, by students properly qualified 
to engage in economic research. Tzvo hours a week. 

EDUCATION 

Professor Richardson ; Associate Professor Pearce ; Miss Chadbourne 

The Courses in Education are arranged to begin the junior year. 
Courses in Philosophy 51 and 52 taken during the sophmore year are 
a prerequisite to all courses in education, which are taken to secure 
credit for the professional secondary certificate. By special permission 
the beginning courses in education may be taken in connection with the 
beginning work in philosophy. Education courses 51, 52, and 77 or 78 
are constant requirements for the professional secondary certificate. In 
addition, to secure this certificate it is necessary for the student to elect 
one of the following courses : Education 75 or 76, Education 83, or 
Education 72. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

51. History of Education. — A consideration of the development of 
education from primitive times to the present. The following topics are 
studied : the earliest education ; education among the Greeks and Romans ; 
education during the middle ages ; the influence of the Reformation on 
the development of school systems and practices, the development of mod- 
ern social forces, the consequent gradual secularization of education, the 
revolutionary developments during the nineteenth century in school sys- 
tems and practices. Special attention is given to the development of the 
secondary schools from the Greek to the present, emphasizing the Ameri- 
can Latin academies and high schools in comparison with the European 
counterparts. Three hours a week. 

52. Principles of Secondary Education. — A study will be made 
of the fundamental conception of the secondary school and its differen- 



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UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



tiation and relation to other institutions; the adolescent; the course of 
study; the equipment; social problems and the direction of student ac- 
tivities; organization and management of the secondary school. Three 
hours a week. 

54. Contemporary Movements in Education. — A critical examina- 
tion of contemporary principles and movements influencing present edu- 
cational thought and practice; education of exceptional children; edu- 
cation through recreation; experimental education; statistical methods 
as applied to educational problems; education and the theory of evolu- 
tion; recent emphasis on industrial, commercial, and agricultural edu- 
cation; recent development of educational method, and enlarging con- 
ceptions and function of education. The course in history of education 
is a prerequisite to this course. Three hours a week. Given in 1917-18 
and alternate years. 

58. School Hygiene. — This course consists of three main divisions: 
(1) The hygiene and sanitation of the school house, lighting, heating, 
ventilation, seating, duties of janitor, hygiene of utensils and books. (2) 
A study of the school child from the standpoint of health, growth, and 
defects ; medical inspection of schools ; contagious and other diseases ; 
which affect school children, including the administrative problems in- 
volved. (3) The hygiene of instruction, including the best mental and 
physical conditions for mental work of school children. Two hours a 
week. 

61, 62. Administration and Supervision of Education. — This 
course is designed for superintendents and principals. Its purpose is 
to present the fundamental problems of organization and development 
of school systems ; relation of the state to education ; state, county, town- 
ship, and district organizaions ; powers and duties of superintendents, 
status of school boards; valuation of curriculums and courses of study; 
relation of schools to the social needs of the community and individual 
needs of child life; efficiency of school systems as indicated by the execu- 
tion of the curriculum, holding power of the schools, age and grade va- 
riations of school children, promotion, retardation and elimination ; school 
finances and reports ; school expenditures and apportionments of school 
funds, selection and tenure of teachers. Three hours a week. 



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71. The Pedagogy and Psychology of High School Subjects. — 
A study of the principles underlying the methods of instruction in the 
various high school subjects, including their place and function in the sec- 
ondary schools, and special attention to the mental processes involved 
in their study. Three hours a week. 

74. Methods in Teaching Agriculture. — The present status of 
agricultural instruction in secondary schools, the application of the prin- 
ciples of pedagogy to the teaching of agriculture and the organization 
of agricultural material into a course. Education 51 and 77 are pre- 
requisites to this course. Required of all students who expect to teach 
agriculture. Two hours a week. 

75, 76. Practice Teaching. — Class teaching of junior and high 
school subjects in the schools of Old Town and Orono. There are spec- 
ial conferences with instructors in charge of these courses. General 
teachers' meetings once a week are required of all practice teachers. At- 
tendance upon these meetings are as much a part of the work as teaching 
the regular class. Five hours a week, four hours credit. Other courses 
may be arranged in proportion to the time and character of the work. 
Practice teaching in agriculture is in connection with the School Course 
in Agriculture. Three hours a week, two hours credit. 

77, 78. Technique of Teaching. — This is a course including the 
principles of class management and general methods of teaching. The 
class room is viewed as a work shop. The technique of learning and 
mental work as found in school room activities will be studied, including 
methods of drill and habituation, questioning, presentation of material, 
lesson plans and aims. The course will include methods of teaching child- 
ren to study and work. It is devised for secondary teachers. Three 
hours a week. 

81. Vocational Education. — The history and status of vocational 
education in the United States and Europe; pertinent lessons to be 
learned from foreign systems; attitude of organized labor; attitude of 
employers of labor ; relation to manual training ; legislation ; experiment 
of private philanthropic institutions, industrial corporations, and public 
schools; articulation with present school system; placements, employ- 
ment; supervision; vocational analysis; cumulative school records; vo- 
cational guidance, surveys, and vocational bureaus. Two hours a week 



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UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



83. Mental and Physical Traits of High School Pupils. — The 
course is designed to give the high school teacher a knowledge of the men- 
tal and physical characteristics and motives of the high school youth, in- 
cluding the intellectual and physical changes of this age, social and group 
life, sexual differences, variation in ability, criminal tendencies, moral 
and religious ideals, and difference in physical and mental age and its bear- 
ing on education. Various high school activities will be valuated from 
the status of the adolescent boy and girl: athletic organizations, intellect- 
ual interests, genetic significance of play and group life. Stress will 
be laid on mental and physical hygiene of adolescent development and the 
characteristic differences between boys and girls. Three hours a week. 

86. Pedagogy and Psychology of Common School Branches. — A 
study of the principles underlying the methods of instruction of the 
various common school branches, their place in the curriculum, including 
the various devices of instruction in each of the subjects for saving of 
time in the learning process. Recent experimental results in reading, 
writing, handwriting, and arithmetic will be used. This course is es- 
pecially designed for superintendents who need an insight into the pres- 
ent status of these subjects for purposes of supervision and administra- 
tion. Two hours a week. 

101, 102. Seminar in Education. — Current methods of measuring 
the results of education, including standards and tests in writing, read- 
ing, spelling, drawing, and English. Each student will be required to 
work out some phase of the subject by the application of the measure- 
ments to the schools of Orono or other towns. Two hours a week. Giv- 
en in 1917-18 and alternate years. 

Primarily for graduates 

103, 104. Seminar in Education. — Methods of testing and meas- 
uring children, including the practical use of mental tests, physical meas- 
urements, hygienic tests and their application in discovering waste in 
education ; physiological age, mental age, pedagogical and chronological 
age of school children will be compared. Each student is expected to 
take a definite problem and work it out in connection with the schools 
of Old Town and Orono. The course is designed for superintendents 
and others who wish to get an insight into the abilities of school child- 
ren. Two hours credit. Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 



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SUMMER TERM 

Professor Richardson; Mr. Fuller 

77s. Technique of Teaching. — This is a course including the prin- 
ciples of class management and general methods of teaching. The class 
room is viewed as a workshop. The technique of learning and mental 
work as found in school room activities will be studied, including meth- 
ods of drill and habituation, questioning, presentation of material, lesson 
plans and aims. The course will include methods of teaching children 
how to study and work. It is devised for secondary teachers. 

72s. Methods in High School Subjects. — This is a course in spec- 
ial methods for the various secondary school branches. The psychologi- 
cal basis for the method of the special subject will first be studied, in- 
cluding the learning technique and the material of the particular branch. 
With this view as a basis the methods for teaching each of the high school 
subjects will be worked out. 

62s. Municipal School Systems. — This is a course designed for 
superintendents and principals. Its purpose is to present the fundamental 
tal problems of city school systems ; principles of underlying supervision, 
curriculum making; powers and duties of superintendents, status of school 
boards ; valuation of curriculums and courses of study ; relation of school 
life to social needs of the community and individual needs of child life ; 
efficiency of school systems as indicated by the execution of the curri- 
culum, holding power of the schools, age and grade variations of school 
children, promotion, retardation and elimination ; devices of training and 
improvement of teachers in service; measurement of qualities and merit 
in teachers and causes and conditions of efficiency in the teaching corps. 
The course will include a study of school finances and reports, school 
expenditures, and apportionments of school funds. Source material will 
be used from recent school reports and surveys of school systems. 

83s. Mental and Physical Traits of High School Pupils. — The 
course is designed to give the high school teacher a knowledge of the 
mental and physical characteristics and motives of the high school 
youth, including the intellectual and physical changes of this age, social 
and group life, sexual differences, variation in ability, criminal tenden- 
cies, moral and religious ideals and difference in physical and mental 



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UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



age and its bearing on education. Various high school activities will 
be valuated from the status of the adolescent boy and girl: athletic or- 
ganizations, intellectual interests, genetic significance of play and group 
life. Stress will be laid on physical and mental hygiene of adolescent 
development and the characteristic difference between boys and girls. 

52s. History of Modern Education. — A very brief review of medi- 
eval social life in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries is made. Then 
the following topics are studied: the influence of the Reformation upon 
the development of school systems and practices, the development of 
modern social forces, the consequent gradual secularization of education, 
the revolutionary developments during the nineteenth century in school 
systems and practices. Special attention is given to the development of 
the American Latin schools, academies, and high schools in comparison 
with their European counterparts. 

56s. Educational Psychology. — This course gives a general intro- 
duction to the study of mental development so far as it is related to 
education. It treats of (1) the original nature of man, considering in- 
stincts and capacities, original satisfiers and annoyers, value and use 
of original tendencies; (2) the psychology of learning with emphasis 
on associative learning, learning by analysis and selection, amount, rate, 
and limit of improvement, factors conditioning improvement, permanence 
of improvement and mental fatigue; (3) individual differences and their 
causes, such as sex, immediate ancestry, influence of maturity and en- 
vironment. 

STATE CERTIFICATION 

All these courses have been planned in cooperation with the State 
Department of Education to meet the need of state certification for 
high school teachers and superintendents. All professional subjects for 
these two classes of certificates are included in the summer term cours- 
es. Any mature student who has the other qualification for certification 
should be able to get the required professional training in two or three 
summers. 

CREDIT TOWARD GRADUATE WORK 

It is the aim of the summer term to supply courses which will allow 
graduate credit to those seeking advanced degrees. This enables stu- 



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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

dents to do part or all of their work for the master's degree during the 
summer term. Courses 77s, 72s, 83s, and 62s will allow graduate credit 
to mature students. 

ENGLISH 

Professor Gray; Professor G. A. Thompson; Assistant Professor 

McAnney; Assistant Professor Reed; Mr. Sheehan; 
Mr. Axtell; Mr. Raven; Mr. Shaw 

Eight hours in English are required for the Bachelor of Arts, and ten 
hours (men) or thirteen (women) for the Bachelor of Science degrees. 
These credits are obtained somewhat differently in the several colleges : 

(1) in the College of Arts and Sciences by taking, during the freshman 
year, Courses 5, 6 and in Public Speaking Courses 1, 2; and during the 
sophomore year, Courses 9, 10, or 11, 12, or 27, 28, or 29, 30, or 37, 38; 

(2) in the College of Agriculture by taking, in the freshman year, Cours- 
es 7, 8; in the sophomore year, Courses 3, 4 in Public Speaking; in the 
Junior year, Courses 17, and 18; women in Home Economics, in the 
freshman year, Courses 5, 6; and during the sophomore year, Courses 
29, 30; and during the senior year, Course 45; (3) in the College of 
Technology by taking, during the freshman year, Courses 7, 8; and in the 
sophomore year, Courses 3, 4 in Public Speaking; and in the senior year 
Course 15. 

English 5-6 or 7-8 are prerequisite, in all colleges, for courses of the 
sophomore year. The required courses of the freshman and sophomore 
years may not be postponed until the junior or senior year without 
permission of the head of the department. 

Elective courses in this department should be taken, so far as prac- 
ticable, in the following order: 

First year: Courses 27-28 or 31-32. 

Second year: Courses 29, 30, 27, 28, perhaps 51 and 52, 35, 36, 39, 
40, 31, 32. 

Third year: Courses 51, 52, or 53, 54, 31 and 32, 41 and 42, 55 and 56, 
13, 35, 36, 37 and 38, 19 and 20, 33 and 34, 39, 40, 21, 61, 62, 23, 24. 

Fourth year : Courses 31 and 32 f 55 and 56, 13, 53 and 54, 21, 61, 62, 
10 and 20, perhaps 59, 60, 66, 67, 68, 25, 26. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Students are expected to consult the head of the department, if they 
find it necessary to make a change. 

For undergraduates only 

5. English Composition and Rhetoric. — The object of this course 
is to give training in writing correct and clear English, with attention 
also to oral expression. The theoretical work consists of the study of 
the fundamental principles of good usage in English writing, and of 
the expository form of composition, with some attention to the narra- 
tive and descriptive forms. In illustration of the theory many selections 
from literature are studied. Weekly themes and monthly essays, with 
conferences. This course is prescribed for freshmen in the College of 
Arts and Sciences. Two hours a week. 

6. English Composition and Rhetoric. — The object of this course 
is the same as in Course 3. The theoretical work consists of the more 
elementary principles of argumentation; practice in making outlines and 
briefs ; weekly themes and monthly essays. This course is prescribed 
for freshmen in the College of Arts and Sciences. Two hours a week. 

7. English Composition. — The theory and practice of composition 
adapted to the needs of technical students. The writing is mainly ex- 
pository; weekly themes and monthly essays, with conferences. This 
course is prescribed for freshmen in the Colleges of Technology and 
Agriculture. Three hours a week in the College of Technology and 
two hours a week in the College of Agriculture. 

8. English Composition. — The theory and practice of composition 
adapted to the needs of technical students. The writing is mainly argu- 
mentative, with attention to the less literary aspects of narrative and 
descriptive writing. Weekly themes and monthly briefs and essays, 
with conferences. This course is prescribed for freshmen in the Col- 
leges of Technology and Agriculture. Three hours a week in the College 
of Technology and two hours a week in the College of Agriculture. 

9. 10. Expository Composition. — A detailed and fairly complete 
study of the theory of exposition, with attention to prose style. Month- 
ly essays and conferences. Two hours a week. Prerequisites, Courses 
5-6 or 7-8. 



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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



11, 12. Argumentative Composition. — An advanced course in the 
theory and practice of argumentation. Monthly essays and conferences. 
Two hours a week. Prerequisites, Courses 5-6 or 7-8. 

13. Advanced Composition. — Informal lectures on various literary 
forms and styles, with a large amount of writing. The object of the 
course is to cultivate clearness, facility, and individuality of style ; and 
to train students to perceive and appreciate these qualities in the best 
books. Specialized writing, as dramatic criticism, for students in Jour- 
nalism. 

Students looking forward to newspaper or magazine work, to a lit- 
erary career, or to teaching, will find this course especially helpful. 

Prerequisites: Courses 5, 6, 9, 10, or 11, 12, 29, 30. Two hours a 
week. 

15. Business English. — Correspondence, mechanical details, re- 
ports, preparation of manuscript for theses and for technical journals. 
Prescribed for seniors in the College of Technology. Two hours a week. 

17. Composition. — This course gives practice in technical journalism 
and news writing, in making reports and summaries of investigation, and 
in the preparation of theses. Open only to juniors and seniors in the 
College of Agriculture. Two hours a week. 

18. Literary Types. — Great books, typical of the several forms of 
literature, will be read. An endeavor will be made to cultivate an ap- 
preciation of the best, both in prose and poetry, and to acquire critical 
knowledge of what constitutes a great drama, a great epic, a great lyric, 
a great novel, etc. Open only to juniors and seniors in the College of 
Agriculture. Two hours a week. 

23, 24. Journalism. — This course gives training and practice in the 
fundamentals of newspaper writing, such as observation or the seeing 
stories that have unique interest, "turning in tips," developing "news/* 
"feature," and "human interest" stories, writing in journalistic style. 
A comparative study is made of the leading newspapers. Three hours a 
week. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



25, 26. Journalism. — Practical newspaper work and technic. Three 
hours a week. Prerequisites, Courses 23, 24. 

27, 28. Practical Journalism. — This course consists of practical 
work in connection with student publications. Two hours a week. 

29. History of English Literature. An outline course, extending 
to the close of the sixteenth century, including extensive reading in the 
English classics. Lectures, assigned reading, and reports. This course 
is introductory to all other courses in English literature, and should be 
taken in the sophomore year. 

Those who can elect only one course in English will probably find 
this course best suited to their needs. Three hours a week. 

30. History of English Literature. — A continuation of Course 29, 
covering the periods from the seventeenth century to the present day. 
Three hours a week. 

31. English Prose in the Eighteenth Century. — Among the 
writings studied are selections from Addison, Swift, Johnson, Goldsmith, 
and Burke. Two hours a week. 

32. English Prose in the Nineteenth Century. — Among the 
writings studied are selections from Macaulay, Carlyle, Ruskin, New- 
man, Matthew Arnold, and Stevenson. Two hours a week. 

33. Shakespeare and the English Drama. — A lecture course giv- 
ing a brief historical survey of the origin and development of the English 
drama to the time of Shakespeare, with assigned reading in the old dra- 
matists. Introductory lectures on the life and art of Shakespeare, with 
a study of an early and a late comedy, and an early and a late tragedy. 
Three hours a week. Given in 1917-18 and alternate years. 

35. Sixteenth Century Literature. — Non-dramatic poetry and 
prose, including selected writings from the works of Wyatt, Surrey, 
Gascoigne, Lyly, Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare, Ben Johnson, and others. 
Attention is given to the development of forms and to literature as a 
reflection of the times. Two hours a week. Given in 1917-18 and al- 
ternate years. 



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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



36. Seventeenth Century Literature. — This course follows Course 
35 and deals with writings from the works of Bacon; Cavalier and Puri- 
tan poets; Herrick, Milton, and Bunyan. Two hours a week. Given 
in 1917-18 and alternate years. 

37, 38. Victorian Poets. — Tennyson, Browning, Rossetti, and Ar- 
nold. A study of selected poems, with additional assigned reading in 
the poets. Special attention is given to the art of Tennyson and Brown- 
ing. Two hours a week. 

39. History of English Literature. — A lecture course giving a 
brief survey of the development of English literature, extending to 
the close of the sixteenth century. Assigned reading and reports. Two 
hours a week. Open to technical students only. 

40. History of English Literature. — This course continues the 
work of 39, covering the periods from the seventeenth century to the 
present time. Two hours a week. Open to technical students only. 

41. Eighteenth Century Poetry. — A study and comparison of 
classical and early romantic poetry, dealing with selected poems from the 
writings of Dryden, Pope, Thomson, Gray, Collins, Goldsmith, Cowper, 
Blake, Burns, and others. Two hours a week. Given in 1916-17 and 
alternate years. 

42. Early Nineteenth Century Poetry. — A continuation of Course 
41. Study of selected poems from the writings of Wordsworth, Coler- 
idge, Scott, Byron, Shelley,, and Keats. Two hours a week. Given in 
1916-17 and alternate years. 

43. 44. American Literature. — A lecture course giving an historical 
outline, with assigned reading. Two hours a week. Prerequisites, 
Courses 29 and 30. 

45. Composition and Literature. — (a) Practice in forms of writ- 
ing especially suited to the needs of women, as the preparation of a club 
paper, etc. (b) A study of the best literature for childhood. Required 
of seniors in Home Economics and elective for other senior women. 
Three hours a week. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



46. The Short-Story. — Practical principles of the structure and 
a critical examination of the short-story as a type of literature. Two 
hours a week. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

51. Old English (Anglo-Saxon). — A first course, designed to in- 
troduce the student of English to the historical study of the language, and 
to the beginnings of English prose and poetry. Elements of Old English 
grammar ; reading of easy prose and poetry. Constant reference is made 
to the relation of old English to modern English and modern German. 
Lectures on the literature of the period 700-1000. This course is advised 
for those intending to teach English, and for all who wish a thoro know- 
ledge of the language and literature. Three hours a week. Given in 
1917-18 and alternate years. 

52. Beowulf. — This, the oldest English epic, is read with attention 
to text, meter, literary, and archeological interests. Prerequisite, Course 
51. Three hours a week. 

53. Middle English Literature. — Elements of the grammar of 
Middle English; reading of the texts in Cook's Literary Middle English 
Reader. Langland's Piers Plowman is read with attention to text, meter, 
and literary interests. Three hours a week. Prerequisite, Course 51. 
Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 

54. Chaucer. — All of the Canterbury Tales and some of the Minor 
Poems are read with attention to language, meter, historical and literary 
interests. Three hours a week. Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 

55. 56. The Novel. — A study of the development and technique of 
the English novel. At least eight of the greatest English and American 
novels will be read. Two hours a week. 

57. Cynewulf. — Reading of The Christ and The Elene, and possi- 
bly some of the poems attributed to Cynewulf, as the Phenix, and the 
Juliana, with attention to text, meter, historical and literary interests. 
Prerequisites, Courses 51, 52. Three hours a week. 

59, 60. The Victorian Period (1830-1900).— A study of the literary, 
social, and scientific movements in England and America; the rise of 



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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



periodical literature ; tractarianism ; pre-Raphaelitism, with special at- 
tention to Carlyle, Emerson, Newman, Matthew Arnold, Ruskin, Ten- 
nyson, Clough, Robert Browning, D. G. Rossetti, Dickens, Thackeray, 
George Eliot, Jane Austen, and the Brontes. Two hours a week. 

61, 62. History of the English Drama. — Special attention is 
given to the immediate predecessors and the contemporaries of Shakes- 
peare. Two hours a week. Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 

63. Teachers' Course in English. — A. This course is conducted 
in cooperation with the Department of Education. It is open only to 
major students in English, and of these only, as a rule, to seniors and 
graduate students. The work is mainly practical, with some theory. 
See Education 75 and 76. B. The aims, methods, and problems of 
teaching English composition and literature in high school and in college. 
Open to seniors who expect to teach English. Two hours a week. 

66. Poetics and Prosody. — A study of the various poetic forms, as 
lyric, epic, drama, and the English meters. Two hours a week. 

67, 68. The Eighteenth Century (1700-1770). — A study of the rise 
of prose, the essay, the magazine, the novel, and the beginnings of 
romanticism, with especial attention to Addison, Steele, Swift, Defoe, 
Pope, Johnson, Goldsmith, Gray. Lectures, assigned reading, and re- 
ports. Two hours a week. 

Primarily for graduates 

101, 102. History and Theory of Literary Criticism. — Three hours 
a week. 

103, 104. Types of Literature. — A comparative study of various lit- 
erary forms. Three hours a week. Prerequisites, Courses 101, 102. 

105, 106. Milton and His Age. — This course is devoted to prob- 
lems of form, sources, and literary influences and relations. Two hours 
a week.. 

107, 108. Seminar. — The subject varies from year to year, and is 
determined by the needs of students in attendance. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

Summer Term 

Professor Gray; Assistant Professor Vaughan 

5s. English Composition and Rhetoric. — Considerable attention 
is given in this course, by way of review, to matters of good and bad 
usage, the sentence, and the paragraph. The advanced work embraces 
the study of rhetoric, especially relative to expository writing. Short and 
long themes, with conferences. The text-books used are Wooley's Hand- 
book of Composition, Boynton's Principles of Composition, Gray's Col- 
lege Theme Tablet. 

6s. English Composition and Rhetoric — This course comprises 
mainly the theory and practice of argumentative writing. Simple briefs, 
short and long written arguments, with conferences. 

33s. Shakespeare and the English Drama. — Lectures and discus- 
sions on Shakespeare's art. Four plays are studied in detail, and several 
more are required to be read. The origin and development of the En- 
glish drama is outlined by lectures and illustrated by stereopticon. The 
Oxford Shakespeare, complete in one volume, is recommended. This 
course alternates with 37s. Given in 1917. 

37s. Victorian Poets. — Special attention is given to the art of 
Tennyson. This course alternates with 33s. Given in 1916. 

45s. Composition and Literature. — This course is designed to meet 
the needs of college women in the home, club, and society, (a) Writ- 
ing of papers, as a club paper, etc.; (b) study of child literature, with 
attention to its adaptation to the various school grades. 

51s. Old English (Anglo-Saxon). — A first course, designed to in- 
troduce the student of English to the historical study of the language 
and to the beginnings of English prose and poetry. Elements of Old 
English grammar; reading of easy prose and poetry. Constant reference 
is made to the relation of old English to modern English and modern 
German. Lectures on the literature of the period 700-1000. This course 
is essential for teachers of English, and for all who wish a thoro 
knowledge of the language and literature. This course may count three 



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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



hours credit toward the master's degree. Open to graduate students 
and advanced undergraduates. 

52s. Beowulf. — This, the oldest English epic, is read with attention 
to text, meter, literary and archaeological interests. Prerequisite, Course 
51s. This course may count three hours' credit toward the master's 
degree. 

Either Course 51s or 52s will be given, according to demand. 

63s. Teachers' Course. — The aims, methods, and problems of teach- 
ing English composition and literature in the high school will be dis- 
cussed and illustrated. Stress will be placed, this session, upon the prep- 
aration of the teacher, drill in the criticism of essays and the considera- 
tion of labor saving devices connected therewith, interest as a factor in 
the study of literature, development of ideas as a factor in composition, 
and the discussion of the important recently published articles on the 
teaching of English. The plan of the course is sufficiently flexible for 
the presentation of special topics or problems by the teachers in atten- 
dance, and so far as practicable, their problems will receive attention. 
This course may count three hours credit toward the master's degree. 

103s. Types of Literature. — This course is an introduction to the 
study of comparative literature. Great books, typical of the principal 
forms of literature, will be read. The aim of the reading and discussions 
will be to cultivate an appreciation of the best and to lay the foundations 
for a critical knowledge of what constitutes a great epic, drama, lyric, 
novel, etc. This course may count three hours' credit toward the mas- 
ter's degree. Open to graduate students; and to undergraduates only by 
special permission. The course presupposes considerable knowledge of 
literature. 

FRENCH 

Professor Segall; Assistant Professor Kueny 
For undergraduates only 

1, 2,. Elementary French. — Grammar, pronunciation, composition, 
conversation, translation. Five hours a week. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



3. Intermediate French. — Grammar, pronunciation, composition, 
conversation, translation. Open to students who have taken Courses 1 
and 2, or an equivalent. Three hours a week. 

4. Intermediate French. — A continuation of Course 3. Two hours 
a week. 

5. Advanced French. — Rapid reading of Nineteenth Century auth- 
ors : Hugo, Michelet, Anatole France, Merimee, Balzac, Gautier, Musset, 
About, Daudet, Zola, Maupassant, Theuriet, Coppee. Open to students 
who have taken Courses 3 and 4, or an equivalent. Three hours a week, 

6. Advanced French. — A continuation of Course 5. Scribe, Mme. 
de Girardin, Feuillet, Labiche, Sandeau, Coppee, Banville, Meilhac et 
Halevy, Rostand, Balzac. Two hours a week. 

7. 8. Elementary French Conversation and Composition. — Open 
to students who have taken Courses 1 and 2, or an equivalent. Two hours 
a week. 

9, 10. Advanced French Conversation and Composition. — Open to 
students who have taken Courses 7 and 8, or an equivalent. Two hours 
a week. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

51, 52. History of French Literature. — A systematic study of the 
evolution of French thought and literary art forms. Extensive reading 
of the great writers. The middle ages ; the Seventeenth, Eighteenth, and 
Nineteenth Centuries ; Lectures, recitations, themes in French. Open to 
students who have taken Courses 5 and 6. Three hours a week. 

53. The Novel in the Nineteenth Century. — The Romantic 
Period : Madame de Stael, Chateaubriand, Victor Hugo, Dumas pere, 
Vigny, Stendhal, George Sand, Balzac, Merimee, Gautier. Lectures, 
recitations, themes in French. Open to students who have taken Courses 
5 and 6. Two hours a week. 

54. The French Novel in the Nineteenth Century. — The Real- 
istic Period : Feuillet, Flaubert, Edmund et Jules de Goncourt, Daudet, 



136 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Zola, Ferdinand Fabre, Maupassant, Anatole France, Loti, Bourget, Rod, 
Paul Margueritte. Lectures, recitations, themes in French. Open to stu- 
dents who have taken Courses 5 and 6. Two hours a week. 

55. The French Drama in the Nineteenth Century. — The Ro- 
mantic Period: Dumas pere, Victor Hugo, Alfred de Vigny, Alfred de 
Musset, Scribe. Lectures, recitations, themes in French. Open to stu- 
dents who have taken Courses 5 and 6. Two hours a week. 

56. The French Drama in the Nineteenth Century. — The Real- 
istic Period: Augier, Dumas fils, Labiche, Meilhac et Halevy, Sardou, 
Pailleron, Henry Becque, Georges de Ports Riche, Paul Hervieu, Maurice 
Donnay, Jules Lemaitre, Frangois de Curel, Eugene Brieux, Henri Lave- 
dan, Coppee, Rostand. Lectures, recitations, themes in French. Open to 
students who have taken Courses 5 and 6. Two hours a week. 

58. How to Teach French. — A teachers' course. Lectures, recita- 
tions, practical exercises. Open to seniors who have taken Courses 9 
and 10, or an equivalent. Two hours a week. 

59, 60. ^jw to Write French. — An advanced course in French 
composition. Open to students who have taken Courses 9 and 10, or an 
equivalent. Two hours a week. Given in 1917-18 and alternate years. 

61, 62. The Middle Ages. — The historic development of the French 
language and literature from the origins to the Renaissance. The na- 
tional epic; the epic of antiquity; romances of love and courtesy. Lyric 
poetry; fables, and Renard the Fox; fabliaux; the Romance of the Rose. 
Didactic literature, sermons, history. Latest medieval poets ; the drama. 
Lectures, recitations, themes in French. Open to students who have 
taken Courses 9, 10, 51, and 52. Three hours a week. Given in 1917-18 
and alternate years. 

Primarily for Graduates 

101, 102. Moliere. — His life and works in close relationship to the 
literary, social, and political environment. The precieux and classic move- 
ments. The historic development of the comedy before and after Mo- 
liere. Lectures, recitations, themes in French. Open to students who 
have taken Courses 51 and 52. Two hours a week. 



137 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



103, 104. The Eighteenth Century. — Memoirs and history; poetry; 
the theatre; the novel. Montesquieu, Vauvenargues, Voltaire, Diderot 
and the Encyclopedia, philosophers, economists, critics. Buffon, Rous- 
seau, Bernardin de Saint-Pierre, Beaumarchais, Andre Chenier. The 
Revolution and the Empire. Lectures, recitations, themes in French. 
Open to students who have taken Courses 51 and 52. Two hours a week. 
Given in 1917-18 and alternate years. 

105, 106. The Poetry of Victor Hugo. — A detailed and close study 
of Hugo's lyric, satiric, and epic poetry. Lectures, recitations, themes 
m French. Open to students who have taken Courses 51 and 52. Two 
hours a week. Given in 1917-18 and alternate years. 

107, 108. The Sixteenth Century. — Renaissance and Reformation. 
Clement Marot, Rabelais, Calvin. The Pleiade and Ronsard. The dra- 
ma. The Protestant Poets : Du Bartas, d'Aubigne. Montaigne, Au- 
thors of Memoirs. Historians and political writers. Lectures, recitations, 
themes in French. Open to students who have taken Courses 51 and 52. 
Two hours a week. Given in 1918-19 and alternate years. 

Summer Term 

Professor Segall; Mr. Dambac 

For undergraduates 

5s. Advanced French. — This course is an equivalent of Course 5. 

6s. Advanced French. — This course is an equivalent of Course 6. 

7s. Elementary French Conversation and Composition. — This 
course is an equivalent of Course 7. 

8s. Elementary French Conversation and Composition. — This 
course is an equivalent of Course 8. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

57s and 58s. How to Teach French. — This course is an equivalent 
of Courses 57 and 58. Given in 1917. 



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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



59s. How to Write French. — This course is an equivalent of 
Course 59. Given in 1918. 

Primarily for Graduates 

101 s. Moliere. This course is an equivalent of Course 101. Given 
in 1920. 

103s. Voltaire. — This course is an equivalent of Course 103. Given 
in 1917. 

105s. The Poetry of Victor Hugo. — This course is an equivalent 
of Course 105. Given in 1919. 

107s. Montaigne. — This course is an equivalent of Course 108. 
Given in 1918. 

GERMAN 

Professor G. W. Thompson; Assistant Professor Drummond; Mr. 
Floyd; Mr. Segal; Miss Kelly 

For undergraduates only 

1, 2. First Year German. — A course for beginners, open only to 
students who are registered in the College of Arts and Sciences. Gram- 
mar ; composition ; reading of numerous texts ; conversation. Five hours 
a week. 

3, 4. Second Year German. — A course for students who have had 
Course 1, 2 or the equivalent. The grammar study, composition, and 
text readings are progressively advanced from Course 1, 2. Three hours 
a week in the fall semester; two hours a week in the spring semester. 

5, 6. Third Year German. — A course for students who have had 
Courses 1, 2, 3, 4 or the equivalent. Texts include 18th and 19th cen- 
tury literature; advanced composition; lectures on the history of Ger- 
man literature. Three hours a wek. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



7, 8. Fourth Year German. — A course for students who have had 
Courses 1, 2, 3 f 4, 5, 6 or the equivalent. Critical reading of standard 
works principally from the 19th century literature; lectures on the struc- 
ture of the drama; advanced composition with original themes. Three 
hours a week. 



Note. These courses are carefully graded in difficulty and are to be 
taken in the order named. For the convenience of students not regis- 
tered in the College of Arts and Sciences who wish to begin the study 
of German the following courses are offered. 

Course 1, 2. A separate division for those who wish to pursue be- 
ginners* German five hours a week, or Courses 9, 10 and 11, 12 in which 
the work of Course 1, 2 may be completed in two years. 

9, 10. Elementary German. — Study of grammar, composition, and 
easy texts which contain a practical vocabulary. Three hours a week 
in the fall semester; two hours a week in the spring semester. 

11, 12. Continuation of Course 9, 10. — More advanced study of 
grammar, composition, and texts. Open to students who have completed 
Course 9, 10 or the equivalent. Three hours a week in the fall semester ; 
two hours a week in the spring semester. 



Note. Course 11, 12 is not an equivalent for Course 3, 4. Courses 
9, 10 and 11, 12 are not open to students registered in the College of 
Arts and Sciences. 

13, 14. Elementary German Conversation. — Three hours a week. 

15, 16. Scientific German. — Separate divisions for Biology and 
Chemistry students. Open only to students whose previous study of 
German will enable them to read scientific German with profit. Two 
hours a week. 

17, 18. Advanced German Conversation and Composition. — Two 
hours a week. 



Note. Courses 13, 14 and 17, 18 are conducted entirely in German. 
19, 20. German Poetry. — Two hours a week. 

140 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

For graduates and undergraduates 

51, 52. History of German Civilization. — Two hours a week. 

53, 54. Faust. — History and development of the Faust idea; incisive 
study of Goethe's Faust; Goethe's life; influence of Faust. Two hours 
a week. 

55, 56. Studies in Nineteenth Century Literature. — Lectures on 
the important literary movements in Germany; critical study of Roman- 
ticism, Young Germany, and Modern Realism; study of current liter- 
ature. Two hours a week. 

57, 58. Studies in Eighteenth Century Literature. — Special at- 
tention is given to the life and works of Klopstock, Lessing, Wieland, 
Herder, Goethe, Schiller. Two hours a week. 

59, 60. Advanced Composition. — Critical study of the art of para- 
graphing ; discussion of German literary models ; development of style. 
One hour a week. 

61, 62. Medieval Literature. — Analysis and reading of the great 
German epics ; study of the Minnesong ; the causes and influences which 
affected the rise and fall of medieval literature. Two hours a week. 

63, 64. How to Teach German. — A course in practical German 
pedagogy with discussion of theories, methods, and linguistic principles, 
and also definite classroom teaching for members of the class under 
the supervision of the instructor. Two hours a week. 

Primarily for Graduates 

101, 102. Gothic. — Introduction to the subject of philology; pho- 
netics; study and reading of Gothic. Open to students whose major is 
German. Two hours a week. 

103, 104. Old High German. — Wright's Old High German Primer. 
The condition for electing this course is the same as for Course 101, 
102. Two hours a week. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



105, 106. Middle High German. — Translation of Middle High Ger- 
man texts. The conditions for electing this course is the same as for 
Courses 101, 102 and 103, 104. Two hours a week. 

107, 108. Advanced Literature. — Research work; original investiga- 
tion. Two hours a week. 



Note. Course 5, 6 may be taken by graduates who elected Course 3, 
4 in their senior year. Collateral reading is a part of all German courses, 
in which the use of simple texts is designed to increase the vocabulary 
and cultivate fluency of translation. The abundance of texts now avail- 
able offers so wide a choice and variation that it is deemed inexpedient 
to name a list of books which will be read. 

Summer Term 

Professor G. W. Thompson; Associate Professor Drummond 

Is. Elementary Course. — For those who wish to acquire or review 
the essentials of German grammar and the foundation of a German 
vocabulary. 

2s. Second Year German. — This course is designed for students 
who have completed a year's work in German, or for such teachers as 
may wish to review their work in this department. 

3s. Conversational German. — For those who have taken at least 
one year of German and wish to get practice in speaking and hearing 
German. German stories will be reproduced orally and in writing. 
There will also be German dictation and memorizing of German songs. 

4s. Old High German. — Given in 1916. 

5s. Nineteenth Century Literature. — Given in 1916. 

6s. Study of Schiller and His Works. — Given in 1916. 

65s. Goethe. — Given in 1917. 



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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

67s. History of German Literature.— From beginning to the time 
of Lessing. Given in 1917. 

105s. Middle High German. — Given in 1917. 

10s. Gothic. — Given in 1918. 

lis. Classical Period. — Given in 1918. 

12s. Study of Hauptmann and Sudermann.— Given in 1918. 

GREEK AND CLASSICAL ARCHEOLOGY 

Professor Huddilston 

The Department of Greek and Classical Archeology is arranged with 
the idea of presenting the several phases of Hellenic civilization. Such 
courses are offered as will prove serviceable not only to those pursuing 
the classical languages, but to the student of average interests who, not 
having studied Greek in the fitting school, may desire to include in his 
college curriculum some work bearing on the permanent literary and art 
values contributed by the ancient Greeks to the civilization of both an- 
cient and modern times. 

Language 

1. Xenophon. — Hellenica, Books I-IV. Study of syntax, and daily 
exercises in writing Greek. Four hours a week. 

2. Homer. — Odyssey, Books VI-XII. The reading of the remaining 
books, in English translation, is required. Assigned readings on the 
history of Greek poetry, "the Homeric question," and Homeric antiqui- 
ties. Four hours a week. 

3. Attic Orators. — Some of the shorter orations of Demosthenes; 
selections from the minor Attic orators; parallel reading on the history 
of Greek prose literature, and the public economy and social life of 
Athens. Two hours a week. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



4. Greek Tragedy. — Euripides's Medea and Sophocles's Antigone. 
The reading of several other plays in English translation is required; 
also, parallel reading on the history of the Greek tragic drama. Three 
hours a week. 

5. Elementary Greek. — The declensions, conjugations; Xenophon's 
Anabasis, Books I-II, and daily writing of Greek based on the text. 
Five hours a week. 

6. Xenophon and Homer. — Anabasis, Books III-IV; sight reading 
in Attic prose; selections from Homer's Iliad. Five hours a week. 



Greek Studies 

Civilization, Literature, Life, Religion 

7. Greek Private Life. — Text-book; lectures, illustrated with lan- 
tern slides and photographs; assigned reading. Two hours a week. 

8. Greek Religion. — A study of the chief divinities in ancient Greek 
religion, and their relation to art and literature; lectures and assigned 
reading; investigation of special topics by members of the class. Two 
hours a week. 

9. 10. Ancient Civilization. — This course has nothing in common 
with the "ancient history" of the preparatory schools. It is rather the 
achievements of the Greeks and Romans in laying the foundations of 
so much that is the basis of our modern day life and thought to which 
attention is directed. Some examination is made of Egyptian and East- 
ern civilization as the historic background on which developed Classical 
life and action. An important part of the course lies in the emphasis 
that is given to the Greek thought and Roman rule in the midst of which 
Christianity sprang up. 

Students who take Greek 53 and 54 after this course will get the 
projection of Classical civilization, especially literature and philosophy, 
as it culminated in the Renaissance of Italy, France, and England. While 
especially the needs of freshmen are kept to the front in this course, it 
is open to all students. 



144 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Instruction is entirely by lectures and each student is required to 
keep a note-bok, and also have as parallel reading Seignobos's Ancient 
Civilization. Three hours a week. 

51. Greek Literature. — The history of poetry, — epic, lyric, and 
dramatic. Types and standards of verse composition established by 
the ancient Greeks, and some consideration of the Greek influence upon 
later poetry, particularly the epic. Lectures and readings from English 
translations. Each student will be expected to make a special study of 
some one author, and in the treatment of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Eu- 
ripides, at least one play of each will be read in class, members of the 
class taking the several parts. This course, as well as the next on prose 
literature, is intended to be foundational for students majoring in clas- 
sics or in modern languages. Three hours a week. Given in 1917-18 
and alternate years. 

52. Greek Literature. — The history of prose literature in ancient 
Greece. History, oratory, and philosophy will be traced in succession. 
Students will be expected to do parallel reading, especially in Thucy- 
dides, Demosthenes and Plato. This course may be taken only in con- 
nection with Greek 51 and like the latter is intended to place the student 
in touch with the forces of lasting value in Greek letters. Three hours 
a week. Given in 1917-18 and alternate years. 

53. 54. Classical Civilization. — A seminar course thruout the 
year, open only to those who have taken Greek 9, 10 and intended to 
develop the classical heritage of the Middle Ages and to follow Greece 
in the revival of learning. Lectures, discussions by members of the 
class, and written and oral reports. Two hours a week. 

HISTORY 

Professor Colvin; Mr. Whitmore 
For undergraduates only 

1. Medieval History. — A general course covering the period from 
395 to 1500 A. D. The disintegration of the Roman Empire; ecclesias- 
tical institutions; feudalism; struggle between the papacy and the empire, 



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UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



rise of modern nations. Required of major students in history. Not 
open to freshmen. Three hours a week. 

2. Modern History. — Continuation of Course 1 to the present time. 
A rapid survey of the Reformation ; the absolute monarchy in France ; 
the French Revolution ; the Napoleonic era ; Europe in the nineteenth cen- 
tury. Not open to freshmen. Three hours a week. 

3. History of England. — From early times to the beginning of the 
Stuart period. Especial attention is given to social and industrial con- 
ditions. Not open to freshmen. Two hours a week. 

4. History of England. — Continuation of Course 3. From the be- 
ginning of the Stuart period to the present. Not open to freshmen. 
Two hours a week. 

5. History of the United States. — A general course from 1848 
6, from 1848 to the present time. Not open to freshmen. Two hours 
a week. 

6. Recent History. — This course deals mainly with the 20th cen- 
tury. A special study is made of some of the most important events in 
the year in which the course is given. Not open to freshmen. Two 
hours a week. 

7. 8. United States History and Government. — This course is 
open to freshmen only, and credit will not be given except for a full year's 
work. Three hours a week. 

9. History of the United States. — The period from 1783 to 1848. 
This course will begin with a brief study of Colonial history from 1750. 
Not open to freshmen. Two hours a week. 

10. History of the United States. — A continuation of Course 
6, from 1848 to the present time. Not open to freshmen. Three hours 
a week. 



146 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

For graduates and undergraduates 

51. The Renaissance. — This course takes up the Renaissance as 
an intellectual and social movement in Italy and its expansion into France, 
England, and Germany. Three hours a week. 

52. The Reformation. — This course is primarily a study of the 
Protestant revolt, but an introductory study will be made of Waldo, St. 
Francis of Assisi, and religious conditions during the Renaissance. Three 
hours a week. 

53. Modern Continental Europe. — The period from the Peace of 
Utrecht to 1789. Three hours a week. 

54. Modern Continental Europe. — Period of the French Revolu- 
tion and Napoleon I. Three hours a week. 

55. Modern Continental Europe. — The period since 1815. Three 
hours a week. 

56. 57. Industrial and Social History of England. — The medieval 
manor town, guild, and foreign trade; Black Death and Peasants' Re- 
bellion; breaking up of the medieval system; expansion of England; the 
industrial revolution; government control in the nineteenth century; and 
the growth of voluntary association. This course is continuous for the 
year and during the latter half is carried over into Colonial and United 
States social and industrial history. 

58, 59. Historical Construction and Criticism. — One hour a week. 

Summer Term 
Professor Colvin 

Is. United States History. — A general survey from 1815 laying 
greatest stress on the period since 1877. This course is primarily for 
teachers and there will be discussion of methods, text-books, and col- 
lateral reading suitable for high school classes. 



147 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



2s. European History. — This course will begin with the Congress 
of Vienna and will be a study of the larger movements of the last cen- 
tury, especially the growth of the central powers. 

3s. English History. — The history of England since 1715 laying 
stress on the development of the British Empire. Arrangements can be 
made by which History 2 or History 3 may be taken to count for grad- 
uate work as a minor. 

LATIN 

Professor Chase 
For undergraduates only 

1. Livy. — Selections from Livy, History of Rome; composition, with 
review of Latin syntax. Four hours a week. 

2. Cicero and Horace. — Cicero, De Senectute; Horace, Odes and 
Epodes ; Latin composition. Four hours a week. 

3. Tacitus. — Reading and discussion of the Agricola and Germania. 
Three hours a week. 

4. Terence and Plautus. — The Phormio of Terence; the Captivi 
and Trinummus of Plautus ; study of early Latin and the development 
of Roman comedy. Three hours a week. 

8. Teachers' Course. — Discussion of topics connected with the teach- 
ing of Latin in secondary schools. Study of selected passages of Caesar, 
Cicero, and Vergil. Two hours a week. Given in 1917-18 and alternate 
years. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

51. Latin Composition. — Practice in writing Latin; study of Latin 
syntax. One hour a week. 

52. Latin Composition. — Practice in writing Latin; study of Latin 
rhetoric. One hour a week. 



148 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



53. The Younger Pliny. — Reading of selected letters of Pliny; the 
Roman Empire. Three hours a week. Given in 1916-17 and alternate 
years. 

54. Horace and Juvenal. — Reading of selections from the great 
satirists ; study of Roman satire and social life. Three hours a week. 
Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 

55. Tacitus. — Reading of the Annales and study of the reign of 
Tiberius. Three hours a week. Given in 1917-18 and alternate years. 

56. The Roman Elegiac Poets. — Selections from Catullus, Tibullus, 
Propertius, and Ovid ; study of elegiac poetry. Three hours a week. 
Given in 1917-18 and alternate years. 

57. 58. Roman Philosophy. — Reading from Cicero's philosophical 
writings and from Lucretius ; discussion of the leading schools of ancient 
philosophy. Three hours a week. Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 

59, 60. Roman Rhetoric and Oratory. — Quintilian (selections from 
the Institutio Oratoria) ; Tacitus (Dialogus de Oratoribus) ; Cicero 
(selections from the Brutus, De Oratore, and Orator). Open to stu- 
dents who have taken Courses 1, 4. Three hours a week. Given in 
1917-18 and alternate years. 

61. Roman Private Life. — Text-book work, supplemented by col- 
lateral reading and lectures upon some of the more important and inter- 
esting customs and institutions of Roman every-day life. Open to 
students who have taken Courses 1, 4. One hour a week. Given in 1917- 
18 and alternate years. 

Primarily for Graduates 

101, 102. Roman Literature. — General introduction to the subject; 
illustrative class-room readings. Open to students who have taken 
Courses 1, 4. Three hours a week. Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 

103, 104. The Latin Language. — A discussion of the fundamental 
principles of linguistic growth and change and of the relationship of 



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Latin to other languages; Latin phonetics; the development of inflec- 
tional forms in Latin. Lectures and recitations. One hour a week. 
Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 

105. Roman Numismatics. — Practice in the use of coins as original 
sources for the study of history, mythology, archeology, etc. One hour 
a week. Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 

107. Sanskrit. — An elementary course in the classical language of 
India, with especial reference to the light it throws upon the history and 
grammar of the languages of Europe. Two hours a week. Given 
when asked for by a sufficient number of students. 

108. Sanscrit. — A continuation of Course 107, with more attention 
to the classical literature of India. Two hours a week. 

Summer Term 

Professor Chase 

2s. College Course. — A course for students who desire college 
credits looking to the B. A. degree. Some standard Latin author will 
be read and discussed. The choice of the subjects will rest partly with 
the* class. We call the especial attention of secondary school teachers 
who have not had the advantage of complete college training in Latin 
to these courses, as we believe they afford an unusual opportunity to 
them to increase their equipment. 

8s. Teachers* Course. — Discussion of topics connected with the 
teaching of Latin in secondary schools. Study of selected passages of 
Caesar, Cicero, and Vergil. 

3s. Graduate Courses. — It is possible for a graduate majoring in 
Latin to fulfil the requirements for the M. A. degree in four summers. 
The department offers a series of advanced courses, of the value of three 
semester hours' credit each, extending over a period of four years. 
These will give twelve semester hours' credit and, together with a 
thesis on some suitable Latin subject, will meet all the major requirements 
for the master's degree. The courses offered, suitable to modifications 



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upon due notice, are as follows: Critical Study of Latin Literature of 
the Ciceronian and Augustan Periods, Roman Philosophy, Roman Rhetor- 
ic and Oratory. In addition to the major work in Latin, a graduate stu- 
dent will be required to take work amounting approximately to twelve 
semester hours in minor subjects. This work can be carried along with 
the Latin work and completed at the same time. It may be most con- 
veniently divided between two subjects which bear some relation to the 
major work. The subjects best adapted for minors are English, History, 
French, Education, and German. 



MATHEMATICS 

Professor Hart; Associate Professor Willard; Assistant Professor 

Hamlin; Assistant Professor Reed; Mr. Woods; Mr. 

Roberts; Doctor Wiener 

Students electing mathematics as a major subject should expect to 
take Courses 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 51, 52, 53, 54, 56, 61, and either Courses 
Astronomy 9, 15, 16, and 57 or Mechanics 51 and 52. They are also ad- 
vised to take several courses in Physics. 

For undergraduates only 

1. Trigonometry. — The trigonometric functions; radian measure; 
functions of two or more angles ; logarithms ; solution of right and oblique 
triangles ; trigonometric equations ; inverse functions. Five hours a week. 
First ten weeks. 

2. Solid Geometry. — Solid and spherical geometry, including ori- 
ginal demonstrations and the solution of numerical problems. Three 
hours a week. Open to all freshmen who did not offer it for admission. 

3. College Algebra. — A brief review of radicals, the theory of 
exponents, quadratic equations, and the binomial theorem; determinants; 
theory of equations. Five hours a week. Last eight weeks. 

4. Spherical Trigonometry. — The elements of this subject with 
problems and applications to spherical astronomy. Two hours a week. 



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5. Advanced Algebra. — Determinants and the solution of higher 
equations. Open to students who have taken Courses 1, 2, and 3. Three 
hours a week. 

6. Analytic Geometry. — The point, line, circle, and conic sections; 
higher plane curves ; elements of solid analytic geometry. Open to stu- 
dents who have had Courses 1 and 3 and the equivalent of Course 2. 
Five hours a week. 

7. Calculus. — Differentiation of the elementary forms of algebraic 
and transcendental functions ; successive differentiation ; differentials ; 
maxima and minma. Open to students who have taken Courses 1, 2, 
3, and 6. Fve hours a week. 

8. Calculus. — A continuation of Course 7. Integration of the ele- 
mentary forms; integration as a summation; various methods of integra- 
tion. Applications of differential and integral calculus. Five hours a 
week. 

11. Trigonometry for Agricultural Students. — A course essen- 
tially equivalent to Course 1. Three hours a week. 

12. Applications of Trigonometry. — A course given for students 
in Agriculture and Forestry, and open to others who have taken Course 
1 or 11. Further practice in the solution of problems with applications 
to plane surveying. Two hours a week. 

13. Differential and Integral Calculus. — A course given for 
students in Chemistry and for those in the College of Arts and Sciences 
who desire only a brief course in this subject. Three hours a week. 

21. The equivalent of Course 2, but given in the fall semester. 
Three hours a week. 



22. The equivalent of Course 1, but given in the spring semester. 
Three hours a week. 



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For graduates and undergraduates 

51. Advanced Analytic Geometry. — A course for students who 
have completed Courses 5, 6, 7, and 8. Three hours a week. Given in 
1916-17 and alternate years. 

52. Solid Analytic Geometry. — A course based upon C. Smith's 
Solid Geometry. Three hours a week. Given in 1916-17 and alternate 
years. 

53. Advanced Calculus. — This course is varied from time to time 
by using different texts. Open to students who have taken Courses 6, 
7, and 8. Three hours a week. Given in 1917-18 and alternate years. 

54. Advanced Integral Calculus. — A continuation of Course 53. 
Three hours a week. Given in 1917-18 and alternate years. 

56. Differential Equations. — Open to students who have taken 
Courses 7, 8. Two hours a week. 

61. History of Mathematics. — Lectures and recitations. Two 
hours a week. Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 

101. Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable. — An elementary 
course in the treatment of anayltic functions. The course includes a 
consideration of infinite series, both single and double, infinite products, 
conformal representation, and a brief application of the theory to Four- 
ier's series, the gamma, beta, and Bessel functions, and spherical har- 
monies. Three hours a week. Not given in 1916-17. 

102. Elliptic Functions. — The Weistrass and Jacobi functions. A 
brief treatment of transformation theory, and numerous examples. 
Three hours a week. Not given in 1916-17. 

103. Modern Analytic Geometry. — Homogeneous coordinates, ideal 
elements, principle of duality, and an analytic treatment of the straight 
line and the conies. Three hours a week. Not given in 1916-17. 

104. Modern Analytic Geometry. — A continuation of Course 103. 
Three hours a week. Not given in 1916-17. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



105. Thermodynamics. — The subject is considered more from a 
mathematical than from a physical standpoint. The subject is developed 
from funamental principles, and is extended to systems of a more gen- 
eral character than those usually considered. Three hours a week. Not 
given in 1916-17. 

106. Thermodynamics. — A continuation of Course 105. Three 
hours a week. Not given in 1916-17. 

107. 108. Theory of Invariants. — An introduction to the gen- 
eral theory of invariants. Symbolic methods are used for both algebraic 
and differential invariants, with applications, particularly to geometry. 
Three hours a week. Given in 1916-17. 

109. Celestial Mechanics. — An elementary course in the planetary 
theory. Three hours a week. Not given in 1916-17. 

110. Hydrodynamics. — The subject is treated in such a way 
as not to require the use of spherical harmonics. The course includes 
a brief treatment of some of the problems of motion in a fluid, including 
wave motion and rectilinear vortex motion. Three hours a week. Not 
given in 1916-17. 

Summer Term 

Professor Hart; Associate Professor Willard; Assistant Professo* 

Reed 

Courses A and B are planned to meet the needs of high school 
teachers who wish to review the subjects, or to study methods of teach- 
ing. All the teachers in this department of the Summer Term had ex- 
perience in high school work before entering upon college teaching. 
Courses 1, 3, 6, 7, 8, 10 should appeal to teachers of high school mathe- 
matics who wish to extend their field of mathematical knowledge or to 
become candidates for a degree. Courses 53 and 101 may be counted 
toward the bachelor's or, under suitable restrictions, toward the master's 
degree. 

A. Teachers' Course in Algebra. — A course intended for teachers 
in preparatory schools and dealing chiefly with the second year's work. 



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Special attention will be given to the methods of presenting the subject 
and those topics will be emphasized that are most important in prepara- 
tion for college work. 

B. Teachers' Course in Geometry. — A review of the more import- 
ant theorems, with practice in the demonstration of original propositions 
and in the solution of numerical exercises. Discussion of text-books 
and of methods of presenting the subject. 

2s. Solid Geometry. — This course is offered especially for the bene- 
fit of students who intend to enter college, but who have not been able 
to complete the requirements in solid geometry. Wentworth and Smith's 
Solid Geometry will probably be used as the text-book, but Phillips and 
Fisher's, Wells's, and other books will be used for reference. 

Is. Plane Trigonometry. — The elements of plane trigonometry, 
including the solution of right and oblique plane triangles, and of prob- 
lems in surveying, together with the use of surveying instruments. No 
text-book will be required for this course, but those having logarithmic 
tables should bring them, and also any modern text-book on trigonometry 
which may be useful for reference. 

3s. College Algebra. — The theory of quadratic equations, the bino- 
mial theorem and so much of the regular freshman course in algebra 
as time will permit. The text-book is Rietz and Crathorne's College 
Algebra. 

6s. Analytic Goemetry. — A brief course covering the elements of 
this subject. The text-book is Phillips' Analytic Geometry. 

7s. Differential and Integral Calculus. — A course intended for 
teachers in preparatory schools, who wish to gain a knowledge of the 
elements of this subject. 

8s. Integral Calculus. — The equivalent of Course 8. Open only 
to those who have previously studied the subject. 

10s. Descriptive Astronomy. — Lectures accompanied by work in 
the observatory. The only mathematics required is an elementary know- 
ledge of geometry and plane trigonometry. The department is well 



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UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



equipped with instruments and apparatus for the teaching of both descrip- 
tive and practical astronomy. 

13s. Differential and Integral Calculus. — Equivalent to Course 
13. Given especially for students in chemistry and physics, but open to 
those who have previously taken either Course 7 or Course 13 or an 
equivalent. 

53s. Advanced Calculus. — Equivalent to a part of Course 53. 

101s. Theory of Functions. — Equivalent to a part of Course 53. 

By suitable selection of topics, a candidate should be able to com- 
plete the work for the master's degree in four or five summer terms, the 
exact time depending upon his mathematical ability and previous mathe- 
matical preparation. 

MUSIC 

Director Sprague 

1, 2. Harmony. — This course deals with the grammar of music. 
It is the foundation of the art of composition, and its study is basic to a 
genuine musical understanding. It treats of the conditions under which 
tones sound together and progress in combination. The work of the 
course consists of the study of intervals, scales, and chords, their struc- 
ture, individualities, and associations ; the harmonization of melodies ; 
analysis. Knowledge of notation required. Two hours a week. 

3. Music Appreciation. A study of the masterpieces of music 
from the viewpoint of the listener. This course is analytical rather than 
historical. While the vital forces and personalities in the development of 
the art are noted and discussed, the music itself is taken as the basis of 
study, a knowledge of the evolution of form in music, of the molds in 
which the composers' ideas are cast, being the most tangible and im- 
mediate approach to an understanding and appreciation of their works. 
Chief stress is placed upon the classic schools culminating in Bach and 
Beethoven. Lectures, illustrations, prescribed readings, and reports. The 



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department is equipped with an angelus for illustration and laboratory- 
investigation. Ability to read music is required. Two hours a week. 

4. Music Appreciation. — A continuation of Course 3. The study 
of the growth of the art is resumed, beginning with the romantic epoch 
following Beethoven and leading through the revolutionary era of Wag- 
ner down to the modern school of the present day. Two hours a week. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Professor Craig 

Students choosing Philosophy as their major subject may do part 
of their major work in the Department of Economics and Sociology. 

1. Evolution. — Evolution of the stars, of the earth, of life, of mind, 
of society; laws of heredity; eugenics. Biological foundation for 
studies in physiology, sociology, and other sciences of human life. Given 
especially for the benefit of students who have had no biology. Three 
hours a week. 

2. Anthropology. — The early history of man. Origins of the arts 
and sciences, of language, of social life, customs, and institutions. Com- 
parison of races and of civilizations. Three hours a week. 

5 or 6. Logic. — A course in logic will be given when there are six 
or more students who wish to take it. Two hours a week. 

51, 52. Psychology. — Anatomy and physiology of the nervous sys- 
tem and sense-organs. Psychology of sensation, instinct, habit, emotion, 
attention, interest, learning, memory, imagination, reasoning, will. This 
is the foundation course in psychology. Required of students in Home 
Economics and in the professional curriculum for teachers. Thruout 
the year. Three hours a week. 

54. Social Psychology. — A study of the social aspects of the in- 
dividual mind; of the instincts which underlie all social life; of social in- 
fluence and social control ; of fashion, convention, and custom ; of the 
crowd, the public, and the deliberative assembly. Open to all upper- 
classmen. Two hours a week. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



57, 58. Experimental Psychology. — Laboratory courses, open to 
a limited number of students. Prerequisite, Philosophy 51. 'fFour hours 
a week. 

59. Mental Mechanisms. — The subconscious, suggestion, motives, 
moods, character, sex, hypnotism, insanity, dreams. Applications in 
art, hygiene, mental healing, managing men, teaching. Open to all upper- 
classmen. One hour a week. 

61. Psychology of the Fine Arts. — Psychology of art in general, 
and of each of the fine arts. Music, architecture, painting, dancing, 
drama, oratory, literature. Given especially for students who are major- 
ing in language or have had some training in at least one of the arts. No 
prerequisites. One hour a week. 

83. Ethics. — History of moral codes and customs. The scientific 
basis of morality. Applications to practical problems. No prerequisites. 
Two hours a week. 

84. History of Philosophy and Science. — Lectures and collateral 
reading. Students trained in science may do all their reading in the 
history of science, and may specialize to a certain degree in any one of the 
sciences. No prerequisites. Two hours a week. 

99, 100. Seminar. — Reviews of psychological literature. The work 
may be continued a number of semesters. One hour a week. 



PHYSICS 

Professor Stevens ; Associate Professor Woodman ; Assistant Pro- 
fessor Holmes ; Mr. Brown ; Mr. Hutchinson 
Note. — For students who are specializing in this department, the 
time indicated for the various laboratory courses may be extended. 
Two and one-half hours of laboratory work give a credit of one hour. 

For undergraduates only 

1. General Physics. — Recitations and lectures on the dynamics of 
solids, liquids, and gases ; sound and light ; experiments before the class ; 



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problems. Open to students who have taken Mathematics 1. Five hours 
a week. 

2. General Physics. — A continuation of Course 1. Heat and elec- 
tricity. Three hours a week. 

3. Qualitative Laboratory Work. — A course in which students who 
are preparing to become teachers of physics are given the opportunity 
of performing the various class-room experiments which accompany the 
lectures in Courses 1 and 2. %Five hours a week. 

4. Laboratory Physics. — The subjects usually included in an un- 
der-graduate course. Especial attention is given to the reduction of ob- 
servations and the tabulation of results. Open to students who have tak- 
en either Course 1 or Course 5. %Five hours a week. 

5. General Physics. — A course covering the ground of Courses 1 
and 2, with more attention to the experimental and historical aspects, 
and less to the mathematical. Five hours a week. 

6. Meteorology. — A course covering the essential principles of the 
subject of meteorology, including a study of meteorological instruments 
and weather predictions. Three hours a week. 

7. Meteorology. — A continuation of Course 6, dealing with special 
topics, and a discussion of the results obtained at the meteorological 
observatory. One hour a week recitation; %two and one-half hours a 
week laboratory. 

8. Elementary Physics. — This course is to be taken only by stu- 
dents in Home Economics, and will consist of four recitations and one 
laboratory period per week. Five hours a week. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

50. Optics. — Lectures and recitations in continuation of Course 1. 
Open to students who have taken Mathematics 8. Three hours a week. 
Given in 1917-18 and alternate years. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



51. Mechanics and Heat. — Advanced laboratory work in continua- 
tion of Course 4. %Seven and one-half hours a week, or %five hours a 
week. 

52. Optics. — Advanced laboratory work in continuation of Course 4. 
%Seven and one-half hours a week, or %five hours a week. 

53. Electrical Measurements. — Advanced laboratory work in con- 
tinuation of Course 4. %Seven and one-half hours a week. 

55. Theory of Electricity and Magnetism. — Lectures and recita- 
tions on the mathematical theory of potential, capacity, and inductance, 
with application to direct current phenomena. Two hours a week. 

57. Problems in Electricity. — This course may only be taken in 
connection with Course 55 or Course 59, as the problems will be selected 
from the work covered in those courses. One or two hours a week. 

58. Mathematical Physics. — The application of mathematical 
methods to the treatment of problems in physics. Two hours a week. 
Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 

59. Theory of Alternating Currents. — Continuation of Course 55, 
with applications to alternating current phenomena; the addition and 
subtraction of vector quantities; the analysis of wave forms by use of 
Fourier's series; the algebra of complex numbers. Two hours a week. 

60. Sound. — Lectures and recitations in continuation of Course 1. 
Open to students who have taken Mathematics 8. Two hours a week. 
Given in 1916-17 and alternate years. 

61. Heat. — An advanced course in heat in continuation of Course 2. 
Three hours a week. Given in 1917-18 and alternate years. 

62. Thermodynamics. — An elementary course in thermodynamics. 
Two hours a week. 

63. Theory of Measurements. — A text-book course covering the 
more important topics treated in this subject. Two hours a week. 



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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



64. Problems in Thermodynamics. — This course may be taken in 
connection with Course 62, by those desiring further training in the 
solution of practical problems in thermodynamics. One or two hours a 
week. 

69. Radio-Activity. — A combined lecture and laboratory course. 
Elementary quantitative experiments in radio-activity are performed. 
Two hours a week. Given in 1917-18 and alternate years. 

Primarily for Graduates 

101. Special Laboratory Course. — A course open to students who 
have completed Courses 51, 52, 53. A subject is assigned for origi- 
nal investigation, or the work of a published research is repeated. \F\ve 
hours a week. 

102. Special Laboratory Course. — A continuation of Course 101. 
\Seven and one-half hours a week. 

103. Radiation. — This course comprises lectures and outside read- 
ing on the following topics : the electromagnetic theory of light ; the 
development of Maxwell's equations ; the application of Maxwell's equa- 
tions to the reflection, refraction, and polarization of light; the radiation 
and absorption of a theoretical black body; the theories of emission and 
absorption ; electric waves and light pressure. Two hours a week. Given 
in 1916-17 and alternate years. 

Summer Term 
Professor Stevens; Associate Professor Woodman 

9s. Elementary Laboratory Course. — This includes a list of experi- 
ments which would be accepted for admission to the University of Maine. 
The course is especially adapted for teachers who wish to become famil- 
iar with the methods of conducting an elementary laboratory course. 
The complete set of apparatus is assembled in the laboratory, and full 
directions are given for performing each experiment. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Is. College Physics.— A course based upon those parts of Kimball's 
College Physics which treat of mechanics, light, and sound. This course 
may be taken for credit only by students who have covered the ground 
in Physics 1. 

2s. College Physics. — A course based upon those parts of Kim- 
ball's College Physics which treat of electricity and heat. This course 
may be taken for credit only by students who have covered the ground in 
Physics 2. 

5s. The General Laboratory Course. — This corresponds to the 
course given in the university for all students in the College of Tech- 
nology. It is based on Miller's Laboratory Manual and includes experi- 
ments along the lines of mechanics, heat, light, sound, and electricity. 

6s. Advanced Laboratory Courses. — These courses are offered in 
optics, electrical measurements, and heat. They are of a more advanced 
nature than those in Course 5s which is a prerequisite for them. 

7s. Advanced Laboratory Course for Graduate Work. — This 
course will be adapted to the requirements of the students, and will be 
offered to such students as have completed the courses above listed. The 
work will be in the nature of a repetition of a published experiment, or 
it may be an original investigation. 

8s. Advanced Physics. — A course for candidates for the master's 
degree will be offered in this department each summer. The course will 
vary for four successive terms so that the student may have an oppor- 
tunity to cover a wide field. For the coming term the subject will be 
Light. The work will be based on Edser's Light, and will, when com- 
pleted, count for two credits on the university books. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 

Professor Daggett; Mr. Cranston 

Courses 1 and 2, 3 and 4, are elementary courses; the advanced 
courses are intended for students who expect to make use of public speak- 
ing in college or in after life, and for students who wish to overcome 



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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



individual faults in everyday speech. Students interested in any form of 
speech-making or debate are advised to take Course 5 at their earliest 
opportunity. This course may be followed by Course 6 or Course 8, 
according to individual interests. 

For undergraduates only 

1, 2. Public Speaking. — Practical training in the fundamentals of 
effective speaking. During the year, the student studies and analyses 
several pieces of exposition, argumentation, and persuasion, and reports 
in writing on his investigation. He also prepares original speeches and 
delivers them before the class. In the speaking, constant attention is 
given to diction and to correction of individual faults. The student's 
grade depends more upon right effort and improvement than upon natural 
qualifications for speaking. Conferences are required. Open only to 
freshmen in the College of Arts and Sciences. One hour a week. 

3, 4. Public Speaking. — Similar to Courses 1 and 2, with the ex- 
ception that more attention is given to exposition and the adaptation 
of technical subject-matter to speaking. Speeches will be delivered for 
the purpose of training the speaker to address a business meeting, or a 
popular audience, on a technical subject. Outside reading and written 
reports are required of all students. Conferences are required of stu- 
dents who need special drill. With the permission of the instructor, 
especially qualified students may substitute any elective course in pub- 
lic speaking, for the required 3 and 4. One hour a week. Open only to 
sophomores in the Colleges of Agriculture and Technology. 

5. Debating. A systematic study of the principles of argumenta- 
tion. Special study of analysis of the proposition, briefing, treatment 
of evidence, refutation, and the preparation of forensics as applied to 
formal debate. Monthly briefs, conferences, and oral debate. Two hours 
a week. Prerequisites, English 5, 6, or 7, 8. 

Students not interested in oral debate should elect English 11. Either 
English 11, or Course 5 give fundamental training for Course 6 and 
Course 8. 

6. Advanced Debating. — A review and continuation of Course 5, 
but devoting relatively more time to practice in oral debate. Open to a 



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UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



limited number of students who have shown ability in argumentation or 
debate. Prerequisites, Course 5 or English 11. Two hours a week. 
With instructor's consent, this course may be repeated with credit. 

7. Oral English. — A fundamental course in voice production, dic- 
tion and extempore speaking. Practice in reading lyric, narrative, and 
dramatic forms, with constant application to the requirements of public 
speech. Prerequisites, English 5, 6 or 7, 8. 

8. The Occasional Public Speech. — A study of persuasion as ap- 
plied to the various forms of public address. The plan and method of 
typical speeches will be studied. The student will also prepare and de- 
liver original speeches illustrating such various forms of public discourse 
as the eulogy, the commencement oration, the anniversary speech, the 
speech in behalf of a cause, the informal discussion, and the after-dinner 
speech. There will be both oral and written exercises, and monthly con- 
ferences. Two hours a week. Prerequisite, Course 5. 

9* or 10. Parliamentary Law. — A course dealing with the principles 
and elementary details of common parliamentary law : what motions may 
be made ; the order in which they may be introduced ; which are debatable ; 
what is the effect. The class will be organized as a deliberative assembly, 
and the student given rapid practice in parliamentary usage. In this 
course, attention will be given to organization of meetings and to draw- 
ing up of constitutions and by-laws. Prerequisites, 1, 2 or 3, 4, or the 
course may be taken simultaneously with the required public speaking. 
One hour a week. 



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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

SPANISH AND ITALIAN 

Professor Raggio; Mr. Buttolph; Mr. Gable 
' SPANISH 

The minimum requirement for a major in Spanish may be met by 
completing Courses 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 51, 52, 53, and 54; the maximum 
number of hours allowed may be taken by adding Courses 55, 56, 57, 
and 58 to the courses mentioned. 

In the following classification, for convenience of description fall 
and spring semester courses have been combined and defined as groups. 

For undergraduates only 

1, 2. Spanish for Beginners. — In this course stress will be laid 
upon conversation as well as upon grammar, reading, and composition. 
The instructor will insist upon careful pronunciation and accurate trans- 
lation. At the end of the course the student should be able to read at 
sight easy Spanish prose. During the spring semester collateral reading 
will be assigned. Five hours a week. 

la, 2a. Spanish for Beginners. — In this course stress will be laid 
upon grammar, reading, and composition. The instructor will insist 
upon careful pronunciation and accurate translation. During the spring 
semester collateral reading will be assigned. Three hours a week. 

3, 4. Spoken Spanish. — Stress will be laid in this course upon 
dictation and conversation. There will be frequent exercises in declama- 
tion and oral composition. Students will be expected to read, memorize, 
and declaim selections in prose and verse. Open to students who pass 
Spanish 1 and 2 with a grade not lower than B, or who otherwise satisfy 
the instructor of their fitness to take the course. Two hours a week. 
To be given in 1917-18. 

3a, 4a. Spoken Spanish. — This course is similar to Spanish 3 and 
4, and is intended for students that have completed Spanish la and 2a 
with a grade not lower than B, or that otherwise satisfy the instructor 
of their fitness to take the course. Two hours a week. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



3b, 4b. Technical Spanish. — The object of this course is to ac- 
quaint the student with the technical vocabulary of the sciences, pure 
and applied, as well as with the forms of private and commercial corres- 
pondence. Open to students who have completed Spanish la and 2a, 
or an equivalent. Two hours a week. To be given in 1917-18. 

5, 6. Spanish Prose and Poetry of the Nineteenth Century. — 
The object of this course is to acquire such a reading knowledge of Span- 
ish as to be able to read at sight ordinary prose and poetry, to gain some 
acquaintance with the literature of the nineteenth century, and to facili- 
tate the study later on of the Spanish classics. Collateral reading will 
be assigned. Open to students who have completed Spanish 1 and 2, 
or an equivalent. Three hours a week. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

51, 52. Spanish Classics. — In this course the first part of Cer- 
vantes's Don Quijote will be read entire. Selections from the dramatic 
works of Lope de Vega and Calderon will be studied. About 1000 pages 
of collateral reading will be assigned. Open to students who have com- 
pleted Spanish 3, 4, 5, and 6, or an equivalent. Three hours a week. 

53, 54. Spanish Civilization. — The subject of this course will be 
approached from the point of view of the Spaniard. Collateral read- 
ing will be assigned. Open to students who have completed Spanish 
5 and 6. Two hours a week. To be given in 1917-18. 

55, 56. Spanish Composition and Rhetoric — This course will be 
conducted in Spanish, and is to be taken contemporaneously with Span- 
ish 57 and 58. A part of the work will consist in the discussion of 
themes written for that course. Open to students who have completed 
Spanish 51, 52, 53, and 54, or an equivalent. Two hours a week. To 
be given in 1918-19. 

57, 58. Historical Survey of Spanish Literature. — In this course 
Spanish literature will be considered from its inception to the present 
day. Semi-monthly themes in Spanish will be written on the epochs, 
and authors discussed. The correction of the themes will form a part 
of the work in Spanish 55 and 56 which must be taken contemporaneous- 
ly with this course. Open to students who have completed Spanish 51, 



166 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



52, 53, and 54, or an equivalent. Three hours a week. To be given 
in 1918-19. 

ITALIAN 

For undergraduates only 

1, 2. Italian for Beginners. — This is a course in Italian grammar, 
reading, and composition designed for those who wish to begin as soon 
as practicable the study of the Italian classics. During the spring semes- 
ter collateral reading will be assigned. Three hours a week. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

51. Carducci. — In this course will be included selections from the 
prose writings as well as from the poetry of Carducci. The structure 
of Italian verse will be considered. The course is intended to serve as 
an introduction to the study of the works of Dante taken up in Course 
52. Collateral reading will be assigned. Open to students who have 
taken Italian 1 and 2, or an equivalent. Three hours a week. To be 
given in 1917-18. 

52. Dante. — In this course the Vita nuova and the Inferno will be 
read entire. Collateral reading will be assigned. Open to students who 
have taken Course 51 or an equivalent. Three hours a week. To be 
given in 1917-18. 



167 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



COLLEGE OF LAW 



FACULTY OF INSTRUCTION 

William Emanuel Walz, A. M., LL. B., Litt. D. Professor of Law 

Dean 
Edgar Myrick Simpson, A. B. Professor of Law 

Clarence Webster Peabody, A. B., LL. B. Professor of Law 

Bartlett Brooks, A. B., LL. B., Assistant Professor of Law 

Lucilius Alonzo Emery, A. M., LL. D., Justice and Chief Justice of 
Supreme Judicial Court of Maine, 1883-1911 

Lecturer on Roman Law and Probate Law 
Louis Carver Southard, M. S., LL. D., Member of the Massachusetts 
Bar and of the United States Supreme Court Bar 

Lecturer on Medico-Legal Relations 
Edward Harward Blake, LL. B., LL. D. Lecturer on Admiralty Law 
Isaac Watson Dyer, A. B. Lecturer on Federal Jurisdiction and Pro- 
cedure, and on Private Corporations. 
John Rogers Mason, A. M., LL. B. Lecturer on Bankruptcy Law 

William Bridgham Peirce, B. M. E. Lecturer on Common Law Pleading 

and Maine Practice. 
Henry Burt Montague, LL. M. Lecturer on Practice and History of Law 



168 



COLLEGE OF LAW 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

v 

The College of Law was opened to students in 1898. It occupies the 
Isaac H. Merrill building, now Stewart Hall, purchased by the university 
in 1911, corner Union and Second Streets, Bangor. In this city are held 
annually one term of the U. S. District Court, five terms of the Maine 
Supreme Judicial Court, one term of the Law Court, and daily sessions 
of the Municipal Court. The law library contains over 5,000 volumes, in- 
cluding the reports of the Federal Courts, and of the Supreme Courts of 
the United States, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, 
Rhode Island, Connecticut, and Ohio ; the Court of Appeals of New York ; 
the New York Common Law and Chancery Reports ; the American De- 
cisions, American Reports, and American State Reports ; the complete 
National Reporter System; the Lawyers' Reports Annotated; the English 
Reports, full verbatim reprint ; the English Ruling Cases ; and the Ameri- 
can Digest ; all the important law encyclopedias ; and a considerable num- 
ber of text-books. 

Advanced Standing 

A student entering from any law school having equal admission re- 
quirements is admitted to advanced standing and given full credit for 
work done in the school from which he comes, upon presenting certifi- 
cates of proficiency from its executive head. All other persons seeking 
advanced standing as regular students must have the necessary education- 
al qualifications required for admission and must pass examinations in 
the subjects covered in the earlier part of the curriculum. 

Members of the bar of any state may be admitted to the senior class 
in the fall semester as candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Laws on 
presentation of their certificates of admission to the bar; graduate stu- 
dents, as well as members of the bar having this degree, may take the 
graduate courses leading to the degree of Master of Laws. 

Methods of Instruction 

The college is not committed exclusively to any one method of in- 
struction, but the case system is consistently used in all the subjects 
of the law for which good case-books have been provided, and the great 
cases of the law, the land marks of legal development, form the basis 
of the recitations. The College of Law recognizes the great value of 



169 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



lectures by able men, and the profit to be found in the use of standard 
text-books; but the greatest stress is placed upon the study of selected 
cases, and most of the work is carried on in this way. It is believed that 
thru the case the student can best come at the controlling principles 
of the law, and that in no other way can he get so vital a comprehension 
of them. "Thru the case to the principle" may, perhaps, adequately 
indicate the standpoint of the college in the matter of method. 

Particular stress is placed upon the practice court, which is held once 
a week as a part of the work of the college, and in which every student 
is required to appear regularly. The questions of law are in all instances 
made to arise from the pleadings prepared by the students, and briefs 
summarizing the points involved and the authorities cited are submitted 
to the presiding judge. 

In the class and recitation work of the college the system of giving 
legal problems has been followed in the past and will more closely be fol- 
lowed now that the new entrance requirements make the completion of 
two year's work in college a prerequisite for admission to full and regular 
standing. This method consists, in brief, in the submission to the class of 
a legal problem to be solved by each individual student either on the same 
day or in writing on the next day, and has been fully described in the 
Report of the Thirtieth Annual Meeting of the American Bar Associa- 
tion held at Portland, Maine, in 1907, pages 1015 to 1017. 

Curriculum 

The curriculum covers three years, in accordance with the require- 
ments for admission to the bar in the State of Maine. College graduates 
of unusual ability are permitted to arrange their work so as to complete 
the course in two years, provided they maintain an average of eighty 
percent, or above. The three years curriculum is, however, recommended 
in all cases. 

Courses designated by an odd number are given in the fall semester; 
those designated by an even number in the spring semester. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Roman Law, Probate Law, and "What to do in Court and How/' 
are given about once in three years. 



170 



COLLEGE OF LAW 

All courses given are required of candidates for the degree of Bache- 
lor of Laws. 

2. Admiralty. — A course of lectures. One hour a week. Mr. 
Blake. 

4. Agency. — Two hours a week. Professor Peabody. 

I. Bankruptcy. — Lectures. One hour a week. Mr. Mason. 

3. Brief Making and the Use of Law Books. — One hour a week. 
Professor Walz. 

5. Carriers. — Three hours a week. Professor Simpson. 

7, 8. Common Law Pleading. — Lectures. One hour a week. Mr. 
Peirce. 

10. Conflict of Laws. — Two hours a week. Professor Peabody. 

12. Constitutional Law. — Two hours a week. Professor Peabody. 

53, 54. Contracts. — Three hours a week. Assistant Professor 
Brooks. 

II. Criminal Law. — One hour a week. Professor Simpson. 

16. Criminal Law. — Two hours a week. Professor Simpson. 

13. Damages. — Two hours a week. Professor Peabody. 

15. Domestic Relations. — Two hours a week. Professor Simpson. 

17. Equity Jurisprudence. — Three hours a week. Professor Walz. 

18. Equity Jurisprudence. — Two hours a week. Professor Walz. 

19. Evidence. — Three hours a week. Professor Simpson. 

20. Equity Pleading. — Two hours a week. Assistant Professor 
Brooks. 

171 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



22. Evidence. — Two hours a week. Professor Simpson. 

24. Executors and Administrators. — Lectures. One hour a week. 
Professor Simpson. 

26. Federal Court. — Lectures. One hour a week. Professor 
Walz. 

23. Federal Jurisdiction and Procedure. — Lectures. Mr. Dyer. 
21. General Review. — One hour a week. Professor Walz. 

55. General Review. — One hour a week. Professor Walz. 

28. History of Law. — Lectures. One hour a week. Professor 
Walz. 

56. Insurance. — Two hours a week. Professor Peabody. 

30. International Law. — Lectures. One hour a week. Professor 
Walz. 

31. Legal Ethics. — One hour a week. Professor Walz. 

34. Maine Practice. — Lectures. One hour a week. Mr. Peirce. 

58. Medico-Legal Relations. — Lectures. About six lectures. Mr. 
Southard. 

57. Municipal Corporations. — Two hours a week. Professor 
Peabody. 

35. Negotiable Paper. — One hour a week. Assistant Professor 
Brooks. 

60. Negotiable Paper. — Two hours a week. Assistant Professor 
Brooks. 

36. Partnership. — Two hours a week. Professor Walz. 

33. Practice and History of Law. — Lectures. Mr. Montague. 



172 



COLLEGE OF LAW 

37, 38. Private Corporations. — Two hours a week. Professor 
Peabody. 

39. Private Corporations. — Lectures. Mr. Dyer. 

40. Probate Law and Practice. — Lectures. About ten hours. 
Ex-Chief Justice Emery. 

41. Real Property. — Three hours a week. Professor Simpson. 

42. Real Property. — Two hours a week. Professor Simpson. 

44. Real Property Cases. — Three hours a week. Professor Simp- 
son. 

46. Roman Law. — Lectures. About ten hours. Ex-Chief Justice 
Emery. 

45. Sales. — Three hours a week. Professor Peabody. 

47. Suretyship. — Three hours a week. Professor Peabody. 

48. What to do in Court. — Lectures. About ten hours. Ex-Chief 
Justice Emery. 

49. 50. Torts. — Three hours a week. Professor Walz. 
52. Wills. — Two hours a week. Professor Peabody. 



173 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 



FACULTY OF INSTRUCTION 

Harold Sherburne Boardman, C. E. Professor of Civil Engineering 

Dean 
Charles Partridge Weston, C. E., M. A. 

Professor of Mechanics and Drawing 
Charles Barto Brown, C. E. Professor of Civil Engineering 

William Edward Barrows, E. E. Professor of Electrical Engineering 
William Jordan Sweetser, S. B. Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
Charles Wilson Easley, Ph. D. Professor of Chemistry 

William Ambrose Jarrett, Pharm. D. Professor of Pharmacy 

♦Albert Theodore Childs, E. E. 

Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 
Archer Lewis Grover, B. S. Associate Professor of Drawing 

tJuLius Ernest Kaulfuss, B. S. 

Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
Carl Henry Lekberg, B. S. 

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
Embert Hiram Sprague, B. S. 

Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
Lloyd Meeks Burgh art, M. A. Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Albert Guy Durgin, M. S. Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Alpheus Crosby Lyon, B. S. Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 
Joseph Newell Stephenson, M. S. Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
John William Harvey, B. S. 

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 
Herbert Hannibal Hillegas, B. S. 

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 



♦Absent on leave, without pay, September 1, 1916, to September 1, 1917. 
fResigned November 11, 1916. 



174 



COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 



John Willard Kimball, Ph. D. Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

DeWiTT McClure Taylor, S. B. 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
Edward D Kingman, Ph. B. 

Acting Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 
Peter Gillespie McKinlay, B. S. 

Instructor in Extension Work in Technology 
Everett Willard Davee Instructor in Wood and Iron Work 

Charles Jenkins Carter Instructor in Machine Tool Work 

♦Walter Elwood Farnham Instructor in Drawing 

Ernest Conant Cheswell Instructor in Electrical Engineering 

Arthur Whiting Leighton Instructor in Drawing 

Harry Gilbert Mitchell, A. M. Instructor in Chemistry 

Chester Hamlin Goldsmith, B. S. Instructor in Chemistry 

Ralph Irwin Alexander, B. S. Instructor in Mechanical Engineering 
John Douglas Glancy, Pharm. D., Ph. C. Instructor in Pharmacy 

Clyde Thomas Graham, B. Sc. Instructor in Civil Engineering 

Edward Knevals Hull Instructor in Drawing 

Marshall Miller, Ch. E. Instructor in Chemistry 

Norman Clifford Small, B. S. Instructor in Civil Engineering 

Lester Frank Weeks, B. S. Instructor in Chemistry 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The College of Technology provides technical instruction in chemis- 
try, in various branches of engineering, and in pharmacy. The number 
of hours required for graduation in this college is one hundred and fifty. 
In such technical curricula it is necessary to prescribe a large proportion 
of the work; but some elective studies may be chosen in the junior and 
senior years. Under each of the curricula described below is given a 
tabulated statement of the subjects pursued and the amount of work re- 
quired. The college comprises : 

Chemical Engineering Curriculum 

Chemistry Curriculum 

Civil Engineering Curriculum 

Electrical Engineering Curriculum 

Mechanical Engineering Curriculum 

Pharmacy Curricula 



♦On half time leave of absence from September 1, 1916, to September 1, 
1917. 

175 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



The following requirements for graduation are common to all cur- 
ricula in this college, with the exception of the short Curricula in 
Pharmacy. 

1. Mathematics, the equivalent of two years, five hours a week, ex- 
cept in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, where one and two-fifths 
years are required, and in Pharmacy, where one year is required. 

2. Science (chemistry, physics, or biology), the equivalent of one 
year, five hours a week, of which time an important part must be occu- 
pied with laboratory work. 

3. Language. English, the equivalent of one year, five hours a week ; 
modern foreign language, the equivalent of one year, five hours a week, 
but the foreign language may not be the one offered for admission ex- 
cept by permission of the Dean of the College of Technology. By per- 
mission of his major instructor, a student may transfer not to exceed 
three semester hours from English to the foreign language which he is 
taking. 

If a student shall offer for admission in addition to the regular ad- 
mission requirement in foreign language, at least two units of another 
modern foreign language, then the above requirement of a five-hour year 
in one of those languages may be waived by his major instructor. 

At graduation in any of these curricula the student receives the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Science; except for the short curricula in Pharmacy 
where the degrees of Graduate in Pharmacy or Pharmaceutical Chemist 
are conferred. The diploma indicates which curriculum has been com- 
pleted. 

Maine Technology Experiment Station 

By action of the Board of Trustees, June, 1915, the establishment of 
a Maine Technology Experiment Station was authorized. This station 
is under the direct control of the President of the University, the Dean 
of the College of Technology, and the heads of the Departments of Chem- 
istry and Engineering. The Station carries on practical research in en- 
gineering subjects, makes investigations for State boards and municipal 
authorities, furnishes scientific information to the industries of the 
State, and distributes accurate scientific knowledge to the people. A 
four-page bulletin will be issued monthly during the college year. 



176 



COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 



Chemical Engineering Curriculum 

In view of the rapid development of the application of chemistry in 
manufacturing, this curriculum is offered to furnish training in engineer- 
ing together with specialization in chemistry. The first two years are 
almost identical with those under the Chemistry Curriculum, but in the 
junior and senior years the student takes the fundamental courses in 
mechanical and electrical engineering, where, in the Chemistry Curriculum, 
the student takes subjects having a biological aspect. The training is 
thus essentially chemical, and the graduates are primarily chemists hav- 
ing a good knowledge of mechanical and electrical engineering. Such 
students will be prepared to enter the profession of chemical engineering 
and to occupy positions in manufacturing establishments such as metal- 
lurgical works, bleacheries, dye houses, chemical plants, gas works, 
sugar refineries, pulp and paper mills, etc. 

Option I. Regular Curriculum 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Subject Hours 

Chemistry 1 or 3 2 

Chemistry 5, f4 2 

Drawing 3, *6 2 

English 5 3 

German 1 or French 3 3 

Mathematics 1 & 3 5 

Military 1, *3 1 

Physical Training *2 y 2 



Spring Semester 
Subject Hours 

Chemistry 2 or 4 3 

Chemistry 6, f4 2 

Drawing 2, *6 1 

English 6 3 

German 2 or French 4 2 

Mathematics 6 5 

Military 2, *3 1 

Physical training *2 1 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Chemistry 11, flO 5 

English 3 1 

Mathematics 13 3 

Mechanical Engineering 3, *4„ V/2 

Military 1, *3 1 

Modern language 3 

Physics 1 5 



Chemistry 60, flO 5 

Chemistry 52, 3 and \A 5 

English 4 1 

Military 2, *3 1 

Modern language 2 

Physics 2.... 3 

Physics 4, J5 2 



177 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Subj ect Hours 

Chemistry 53 3 

Chemistry 63, "\8 4 

Chemistry 71 3 

Chemistry 17, f4 2 

Chemistry 75 2 

Mechanical Engineering 75, f3 1J4 

Physics 53, $7^ 3 



Spring Semester 
Subject Hours 

Chemistry 72 2 

Chemistry 64, f4 2 

Chemistry 66, f4 ~ 2 

Chemistry 74, f6 3 

Chemistry 96, f4 2 

Mechanical Engineering 14.... 3 

Electrical Engineering 30 ... 2 

Elective ~ 2 



SENIOR YEAR 



Chemistry 77 _ 3 

Chemistry 101 3 

Chemistry 57, f6 - 3 

Chemistry 105 or Geology 3 — 2 

Electrical Engineering 35 2 

Electrical Engineering 33 f4 2 

English 15 2 

Elective ~ 1 



Chemistry 98, flO.. 

Chemistry 94 

Chemistry 76 

Chemistry 104, f8- 
Elective _ 



Option II. Pulp and Paper Curriculum 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Same as in Option i 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Chemistry 11, flO 

English 3 

Mathematics 13 

Biology 17, f2 - 

Military 1, *3 - 

Modern language ~ 

Physics 1 



5 Chemistry 60, flO 5 

1 Chemistry 52, 3 and f4 5 

3 English 4 1 

1 Modern language _ 2 

1 Physics 2 3 

3 Physics 4, J5 2 

5 Chemistry 44 2 

Military 2, *3 1 



178 



COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Subject Hours 

Chemistry 83, f4 2 

Chemistry 53 3 

Chemistry 55, f4 2 

Chemistry 71 3 

Chemistry 81 2 

Chemistry 27 1 

Mechanics 11 3 

Civil Engineering 33 1 

German 15 2 

Forestry 9 1 



Spring Semester 
Subject Hours 

Chemistry 72 2 

Chemistry 82, f4 2 

Chemistry 66, f4 2 

Chemistry 74, f6 3 

Chemistry 84 2 

Electrical Engineering 30 2 

Forestry 2 2 

Elective 2 



SENIOR YEAR 



Chemistry 77 3 

Chemistry 89, f4 2 

Chemistry 87, f4 2 

Chemistry 93 — 1 

Electrical Engineering 35 2 

Electrical Engineering 33 f f4 2 

English 15 2 

Civil Engineering 35 2 

Mechanical Engineering 99 2 



Chemistry 98, flO 5 

Chemistry 86, \l 1 

Chemistry 88 2 

Mechanical Engineering 14 2 

Mechanical Engineering 94.... lj^ 

Economics 6 3 

Elective 3 



At graduation the student receives the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Upon the completion of one year's prescribed work in residence, including 
the presentation of a satisfactory thesis, he receives the degree of Mas- 
ter of Science. Three years after graduation, upon the presentation of a 
satisfactory thesis and proofs of professional work, he may receive the 
degree of Chemical Engineer. 

Chemistry Curriculum 

This curriculum is designed to give the student not only a thorough 
technical training, but also a breadth of education which will enable 
him readily to undertake the great variety of problems which naturally 
present themselves to a chemist. It differs from the Chemical Engi- 



179 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



neering curriculum in that in the last two years the student takes courses 
having a biological aspect (bacteriology, biological chemistry, and agricul- 
tural analysis) rather than those of an engineering type. The curriculum 
is a broad one and, when completed, it prepares the student to teach, 
or for the profession of chemist in experiment stations, food laboratories, 
chemical fertilizer and tanning plants; metallurgical, rubber and electric 
machinery manufactories ; and the general consulting and analytical work 
of a professional chemist. 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

Same as in Chemical Engineering 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Subject Hours 

Chemistry 1 or 3 2 

English 3 1 

Mathematics 13 3 

Modern language 3 

Military 1, *3 1 

Physics 1 5 



Spring Semester 
Subject Hours 

Chemistry 60, flO 5 

Chemistry 52, 3 andf4 5 

English 4 1 

Modern language 2 

Military 2, *3 1 

Physics 2 2 

Physics 4, $5 2 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Biological Chemistry 1 5 

Chemistry 53 3 

Chemistry 71 3 

Chemistry 75 2 

Chemistry 63, f8 4 

Modern language 3 



Agricultural Chemistry 4, flO 5 

Bacteriology 1, f6 3 

Chemistry 72 2 

Chemistry 74, f6 3 

Modern language 2 

Elective 4 



180 



COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 



SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Subject Hours Subject Hours 

Chemistry 57, f6 3 Chemistry 98, flO 5 

Chemistry 101 3 Chemistry 76 2 

Chemistry 77 2 Chemistry 94 1 

Chemistry 61, f4 2 Chemistry 104, f8 ■ 4 

Chemistry 105 or Geology 3 2 Elective 4 

English 15 2 

Elective 3 



Civil Engineering Curriculum 

The object of the Curriculum in Civil Engineering is to give the 
student as thoro a knowledge as possible of the principles underlying 
the profession. The attempt is made to give the student not only a tech- 
nical education, but to form the basis for a liberal one as well. 

The endeavor is made to impress upon the mind of the student that 
the granting of his bachelor's degree does not make him an engineer. 
It simply indicates that he has received the mental technical training 
which will fit him to follow the profession, and that he must begin at the 
bottom of the ladder of practice in order to obtain experience and judg- 
ment, without which he can never become successful. 

The methods of instruction are recitations, lectures, original prob- 
lems, work in the testing laboratories, field practice, and designing. 
Effort is made to acquaint the student with the best engineering practice 
and with the standard engineering literature. 

The work of the first year is the same for all engineering students, 
especial attention being paid to mathematics and English. The technical 
work begins in the fall semester of the second year with field work 
and the study of surveying. This technical work is gradually increased, 
until the last year when it is nearly all professional. At the beginning 
of the fourth year an opportunity is offered to specialize slightly along 
one of three lines. The first, called Option 1, consists of work in hy- 
draulic enginering and electrical transmission, the second, Option 2, 
consists of work in railroad engineering, while Option 3 consists of work 
in highway engineering. 



181 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



The following outline constitutes the regular four-year curriculum. 
Certain general subjects which are given as requirements may, on pre- 
sentation of reasons satisfactory to the head of the department, be omit- 
ted and others substituted. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Subject Hours 

Chemistry 1 or 3 2 

Chemistry 5, f4 2 

Drawing 1, *6 2 

English 7 3 

Mathematics 1 and 3 5 

Military 1, *3 1 

Modern language 3 

Physical training *2 % 



Spring Semester 
Subject Hours 

Chemistry 2 or 4 3 

Chemistry 6, f4 2 

Drawing 2, *6 2 

English 6 3 

Mathematics 6 5 

Military 2, *3 1 

Modern language 2 

Physical training *2 1 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Civil Engineering 1 2 z / 2 Civil Engineering 2 and 4 2 

Drawing 3, *6 2 Civil Engineering 6 and 8 3 



Public Speaking 3 1 

Mathematics 7.. 5 

Military 1, *3 1 

Modern language 3 

Physics 1 5 



Drawing 4, *6 2 

Public Speaking 4 1 

Mathematics 8 5 

Military 2, *3 1 

Modern language 2 

Physics 2 3 

Physics 4, $5 2 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Civil Engineering 25 2 

Civil Engineering 21, 23, *6 2 

Civil Engineering 29 2 

Economics lb 2 

Geology 6 2 

Mechanics 51 5 

Mathematics 57 3 

Physics 51, $2y 2 1 



Civil Engineering 20 2 

Civil Engineering 22 2 

Civil Engineering 26 3 

Civil Engineering 28 3 

Economics 2b 2 

Mechanics 52 5 

Mechanical Engineering 74, f2 1 

*Civil Engineering 24 2 

♦Taken after Commencement 



182 



COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 



SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Subject Hours Subject Hours 

Civil Engineering 57 3 Civil Engineering 58 3 

Civil Engineering 67 1 Civil Engineering 60 2 

Civil Engineering 59, f9 4 J A Civil Engineering 62, f6 3 

Civil Engineering 55 and 51 Civil Engineering 52 and Elec- 
( Option 1) 4 trical Engineering 42 (Op- 
Civil Engineering 63 and 53 tion 1) 5 

(Option 2) 4 Civil Engineering 64 and 66 

Civil Engineering 69 and 53 (Option 2) 5 

(Option 3) ~ 4 Civil Engineering 72 and 74 

History 5 2 (Option 3) 5 

English 15 or 31 2 Civil Engineering 70, f2 1 

Economics 6 3 



Electrical Engineering Curriculum 

This curriculum is intended to provide the student with a thoro un- 
derstanding of the underlying principles of electrical engineering and to 
develop an ability to solve problems of an engineering nature from com- 
mercial as well as technical premises. To accomplish this, the student 
first studies the various electrical laws and methods of electrical meas- 
urements and correlates them with various laws previously assimilated 
in the study of physics and mathematics. These studies are followed by 
more advanced courses involving the fundamental electrical laws and 
theories and showing their application to the design, operation, and per- 
formance of electrical apparatus such as is used in the generation of 
electrical energy or in transforming electrical energy into mechanical 
energy for the various commercial requirements. 

It is the endeavor of the curriculum to acquaint the student with con- 
temporary engineering practice and, by persistent association of abstract 
analysis with practical problems, to equip him with the fundamentals of 
a successful career. Stress is laid upon the systematic reading of tech- 
nical periodicals and the acquirement of a reference library. Effort is 
made to have lectures by active engineers and alumni following their 
profession, thus bringing the student into more intimate contact with the 
tngineering world. 



183 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



In addition to the purely electrical subjects, the student takes the 
customary work in mathematics, physics, mechanics, shop, drawing, and 
allied engineering courses, together with the cultural subjects enumer- 
ated below. 



Requirements for Graduation 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Subject Hours 

Chemistry 1 or 3 2 

Chemistry 5, f4 2 

Drawing 1, *6 2 

English 7 3 

Mathematics 1 and 3 5 

Military 1, *3 1 

Modern language 3 

Physical Training *2 J^ 



Spring Semester 
Subject Hours 

Chemistry 2 or 4 3 

Chemistry 6, f4 2 

Drawing 2, *6 2 

English 8 2 

Mathematics 6 5 

Military 2, *3 1 

Modern language 2 

Physical training *2 1 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Electrical Engineering 1 2 

Public Speaking 3 1 

Mathematics 7 5 

Physics 1 5 

Drawing 3, *6 2 

Modern language 3 

Military 1, *3 1 



Electrical Engineering 2 2 

Public Speaking 4 1 

Modern language 2 

Mathematics 8 5 

Physics 2 3 

Physics Laboratory 4, $5 2 

Mechanical Engineering 56.... 3 

Drawing 4, *6 2 

Military 2, *3 1 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Electrical Engineering 5 3 

Mechanics 51 5 

Mechanical Engineering 9, *4.. 1^2 

Economics lb 2 

Civil Engineering 3 2 

Civil Engineering 5, *6 ^ 

Physics 53, -f7y 2 3 

Elective 2 



Electrical Engineering 50 3 

Electrical Engineering 8, *4.... 2 

Mechanics 52 5 

Mechanical Engineering 10, *4 1^ 
Economics 2b 

or Mathematics 56 2 

Economics 2b 2 

Mechanical Engineering 66.... 3 

Mechanical Engineering 80.... 3 



184 



COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Subject Hours Subject •••■•« Hours 

Electrical Engineering 51 3 Electrical Engineering 52 2 T / 2 

Electrical Engineering 53 2 Electrical Engineering 54 1 

Electrical Engineering 55, t4.... V/2 Electrical Engineering 56 2y 2 

Electrical Engineering 75, *4.„. 2 Electrical Engineering 58 2 

Civil Engineering 33 1 Electrical Engineering 76, f4 2 

Civil Engineering 35 2 Economics 6 3 

Mechanical Engineering 83 3 Elective 2 

Mechanical Engineering 77, f3 V/2 Inspection Trip Thesis 

English 15 2 Thesis 

Elective 2 



Mechanical Engineering Curriculum 

The field of the mechanical engineer embraces all work involving the 
design, construction, or installation of machinery, either for manufactur- 
ing, transportation, or power generation ; the design, manufacture, and in- 
stallation of heating and ventilating or refrigerating equipment; the su- 
perintendence or management of factories, power plants, and motive 
power; the equipment of railways, and similar work. 

The Mechanical Engineering Curriculum is arranged to equip men 
as well as possible in four years' time to enter any of these lines of work. 

It is not possible to develop the student into an expert engineer in 
any branch of the profession. It is also not possible, in general, to 
foresee what will be his ultimate occupation. Accordingly, those subjects 
which are fundamental to all engineering work and which may best be 
learned in college are most emphasized in the required courses while the 
those subjects which are best acquired in practical work are left for the 
engineer graduate to obtain in actual practice. An endeavor is made, 
however, to give the more advanced technical courses such a trend as to 
make the period of adjustment of the graduate to practical engineering 
conditions short and his acquirement of the knowledge necessary for ad- 
vancement rapid. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



The theoretical work is taught mainly by recitations, based upon 
carefully. chosen -texts which are supplemented or brought down to date, 
where necessary, by explanations or ilustrative examples on the part of 
the instructor. Numerous problems are assigned for work outside the 
class-room to make sure the student can apply the principles learned. 

Courses in the shops and laboratories illustrate the application of 
matter learned in the recitation work, and also teach methods of con- 
struction, operation, and testing of apparatus by direct contact with it. 
In the drawing rooms, application of theories to work in design are 
taught, together with methods and requirements for the production of 
neat and accurate engineering drawings. 

Thoro instruction is given in the theory and operation of both direct 
and alternating current electrical machinery, with ample practice in the 
electrical laboratory. Sufficient time is devoted to recitation and field 
work in surveying to give familiarity with instruments and methods. 
Lectures by practical engineers and trips of inspection to engineering 
works help to bring before the student the conditions existing in prac- 
tice. 



Requirements for Graduation 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Subject Hours 

Chemistry 1 or 3 - 2 

Chemistry 5, f4 2 

Drawing 1, *6 2 

English 7 3 

Mathematics 1 and 3 5 

Military 1, *3 1 

Modern language 3 

Physical training *2 Y* 



Spring Semester 
Subject Houri 

Chemistry 2 or 4 3 

Chemistry 6, f4 2 

Drawing 2, *6 2 

English 8 3 

Mathematics 6 5 

Military 2, *3 1 

Modern language 2 

Physical training *2 1 



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COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Subject Hours 

Drawing 3, *6 2 

Mathematics 7 5 

Mechanical Engineering 11, *3 1 

Military 1, *3 1 

Modern language 3 

Physics 1 5 

Mechanical Engineering 5, *3..~ 1 

Public Speaking 1 3 



Spring Semester 
Subject Hours 

Drawing 4, *6 2 

Public Speaking 4 1 

Mathematics 8 5 

Mechanical Engineering 2, *6 2 

Mechanical Engineering 56.... 3 

Military 2, *3 1 

Modern language 2 

Physics 2 3 

Physics 4, J5 2 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Mechanical Enginering 7, *6.... 2 

Mechanical Engineering 61 2 

Mechanical Engineering 59, *3.. 1 

Mechanical Engineering 81, 3 

Civil Engineering 3 2 

Civil Engineering 5 J4 

Mechanics 51 5 

Fhysics 51, $5 2 

Economics 16 2 



Mechanical Engineering 8, *6 2 

Mechanical Engineering 66.. 3 

Mechanical Engineering 82.... 3 

Mechanical Engineering 70, f2 1 

Mechanical Engineering 68.... 2 

Electrical Engineering 30 2 

Mechanics 52 5 



SENIOR YEAR 



Mechanical Engineering 83 

Mechanical Engineering 71, f3~ 
Mechanical Engineering 67, *6.. 

Civil Engineering 33 

Civil Engineering 35 

Electrical Engineering 31 

Electrical Engineering 33, f3.... 

Mechanical Engineering 91 

English 5 

Philosophy 51 



3 fMechanical Engineering 68.. 2 

\y 2 Mechanical Engineering 72, f3 V/2 

2 Mechanical Engineering 84.... 2 

1 Mechanical Engineering 88, *6 2 

2 *Mechanical Engineering 94 1J4 

2 ^Economics 2b 2 

lJ/£ Electrical Engineering 34, f2 1 

\y 2 Mechanical Engineering 96.... 1 

2 Mechanical Engineering 98.... 2 

3 Inspection Trip 

Thesis 

♦Substitution may be offered for this course if approved by the major 
instructor. 

tWill be given in the junior year only, beginning with 1917-18. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Pharmacy Curricula 

The Department of Pharmacy offers three curricula, one of four 
years, one of three years, and one of two years. 

The four-year curriculum is offered in response to a demand for a 
combined collegiate and technical training for those who design to prac- 
tice pharmacy. It aims therefore to combine general culture studies 
with a training in those sciences fundamental to technical pharmacy, 
to the end that the pharmacist may be equipped culturally and technically 
to fulfill the increased demands and responsibilities of his exacting 
calling. Hence, this curriculum includes the appropriate sciences and la- 
boratory courses, it also includes cultural courses in modern languages, 
history, philosophy, and economics. While in the latter three subjects 
particular courses are not specified, a minimum number and proper se- 
quence of such courses are required. 

Those who intend to prepare for pharmaceutical work are urged to 
consider carefully the superior advantages of this curriculum. The in- 
creasing importance of the chemical, biological, and sanitary sciences, 
and of the pharmacist's relation to them, emphasized by the era of food 
and drug legislation now upon us, points out at once the path of new duty 
and of enlarged opportunity to those fitted to enter. To the unfit, the 
new duty remains, without the enlarged opportunity. 

Instruction in pharmaceutical studies is given by lectures, recitations, 
and tests, supplemented by work in the laboratories of chemistry, biol- 
ogy, and pharmacy. Thirty hours are required for graduation. 

The library contains valuable reference literature in chemistry, phar- 
macy, and allied sciences, and the leading scientific and technical jour- 
nals. 

Requirements for Graduation, Four- Year Curriculum 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Subject Hours Subject Hours 

Chemistry 1 or 2 2 Chemistry 2 3 

Chemistry 3, f4 2 Chemistry 6, f4 2 

English 8 3 English 6 4 

^French 3 or German 2 2 French 4 or German lb 2 

Mathematics 1 and 3 5 Military 2, *3 1 

Military 1, *3 1 Physical training *2 1 

Physical training *2 y 2 Mathematics 6 5 

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COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Subject Hours 

Biology 1 4 

Chemistry 11, flO 5 

English 3 1 

Military 1, *3 1 

Modern language 3 

Physics 1 5 



Spring Semester 
Subject Hours 

Biology 2 4 

Chemistry 52 5 

English 4 1 

Military 2, *3 1 

Modern language 2 

Physics 2 3 

Physics 4, $5 2 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Biological chemistry 1 5 

Biology 15 3 

Chemistry 53 3 

Pharmacy 13 3 

Pharmacy 7 3 

Pharmacy 9 3 



Bacteriology 1, f6 3 

Chemistry 60 flO 5 

Laboratory biological chem- 
istry 2, f4 2 

Pharmacy 2 4 

Pharmacy 16, f8 4 

Pharmacy 4 2 



SENIOR YEAR 



Pharmacy 11 2 

Pharmacy 17, fS 4 

Chemistry 61, f4 2 

Pharmacy 3 3 

Elective 3 

Chemistry 41, f8 4 

Pharmacy 51 2 



Pharmacy 54 1 

Pharmacy 14 5 

Pharmacy 18, f!2 6 

Pharmacy 20 3 

Pharmacy 58 2 

Pharmacy 22, f4 2 



At graduation the student receives the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Upon the completion of one additional year's prescribed work in resi- 
dence, including the presentation of a satisfactory thesis, he receives 
the degree of Master of Science. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Three- Year Curriculum 

This is designed more especially for those who wish to enter the 
commercial field of pharmaceutical chemistry or food and drug analysis. 
It also enables the pharmacist to strengthen his professional relations 
by the practice of urinary, bacteriological, and toxicological analysis 
for the physician. This curriculum includes a foreign language, English, 
and science, as well as advanced studies in pharmacy and chemistry, not 
given in the two-year curriculum. 

The work of the first two years corresponds to that of the two-year 
curriculum. Upon the completion of this curriculum the student receives 
the degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist. 

Third Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Subject Hours Subject Hours 

Bacteriology 1, f6 3 Chemistry 68 2 

German 9 3 Biological Chemistry 8, f6 3 

English 7 3 English 8 3 

Physics 5 5 German 10 2 

Biological Chemistry 1 5 Chemistry 92 2 

Elective 2 Pharmacy 22, f8 4 



Two Year Curriculum 

Ths curriculum is designed for those who for lack of time or for 
other reasons, are unable to take the other curricula. The more general 
educational studies of the full curriculum are omitted, but as broad a 
range of subjects is offered as can be undertaken without sacrifice of 
thoroness in the technical work. The curriculum corresponds, in gener- 
al, to the usual full curriculum of pharmacy colleges. The work re- 
quired of the student will occupy his whole time during the college year 
of nine months, and will usually exclude work in drug stores during term 
time. The brevity of this curriculum does not warrant extending to oth- 
er than advanced students the privilege of electives. Upon its comple- 
tion the student receives the degree of Graduate in Pharmacy. 



190 



COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 



FIRST YEAR 



Subject Hours Subject Hours 

Chemistry 1 or 3 .. 2 Botany 14 3 

Chemistry 11, j\6 8 Chemistry 2 3 

Pharmacy 13 3 Chemistry 52 5 

Pharmacy 7 3 Pharmacy 16, f8 4 

Pharmacy 9 3 Pharmacy 2 4 

Pharmacy 11 2 Pharmacy 4 2 

SECOND YEAR 

Chemistry 53 3 Pharmacy 54 1 

Pharmaceutical histology 15... 3 Pharmacy 18, |12 6 

Pharmacy 3 3 Pharmacy 14 5 

Pharmacy 17, f8 4 Pharmacy 58 2 

Chemistry 41, f8 4 Pharmacy 20 - 3 



191 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



Note. A star (*) before the time designated for a course indicates 
that three hours of actual work are required to obtain credit for one 
hour; a dagger (f) indicates that two hours are required. 

Courses designated by an odd number are given in the fall semester; 
those designated by an even number, in the spring semester. 

CHEMISTRY 

Professor Easley; Assistant Professor Burghart; Assistant Profes- 
sor Durgin; Assistant Professor Stephenson; Assis- 
tant Professor Kimball; Mr. Mitchell; Mr. 
Goldsmith ; Mr. Miller ; Mr. Weeks 

For undergraduates only 

1. General Chemistry. — This course deals with the general prin- 
ciples of the science. Lectures and recitations. Open to students who 
have taken chemistry in preparatory school. Two hours a week. To 
be accompanied by Course 5. Courses 1, 2, 5, and 6 ; or 3, 4, 5, and 6 con- 
stitute the first year's work in chemistry. 

2. General Chemistry. — This course is a continuation of Course 1. 
It is mainly devoted to a study of the metallic elements, their classifica- 
tion, compounds, and chemical properties. Lectures and recitations. 
Three hours a week. To be accompanied by Course 6. 

3. General Chemistry. — A course similar to 1 for those who have 
had no previous work in chemistry. Two hours a week. To be accom- 
panied by Course 5. 



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COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 

4. General Chemistry. — A course similar to 2 but in continuation 
of 1 for those who did not take chemistry in the preparatory school. 
Three hours a week. To be accompanied by Course 6. 

5. Laboratory Chemistry. — Laboratory work to accompany Course 
1 or Course 3. fFour hours a week. 

6. Laboratory Chemistry. — A continuation of Course 5 to accom- 
pany Course 2, or Course 4. fFour hours a week. 

11. Qualitative Analysis. — This course includes the general reac- 
tions of the metals and acids with their qualitative separation. The 
subject is studied from the standpoint of the law of mass action and 
the ionic theory. 11a. One hour a week. lib. Eight hours a week. 

13. Qualitative Analysis for Pharmacists. — 1*16 hours a week. 

15. Organic Chemistry. — An elementary one semester course in 
organic chemistry. Required of sophomores majoring in Agriculture. 
Two hours class room and ftwo hours laboratory work a week. 

16. Organic Chemistry. — An elementary course giving in one sem- 
ester a rapid view of the subject. Students who have sufficient time 
available are advised to take Courses 52 and 53 instead of this course, 
or Course 15. No prerequisite other than general chemistry. Three 
hours class room and ffour hours laboratory work a week. 

17. Gas and Fuel Analysis. — The work consists in the analysis 
of fuel and flue gases and the determinations of the proximate consti- 
tuents and heating values of peat, fuel oils, and the common coals. "fFour 
hours a week. 

20. Descriptive Mineralogy. — An elementary course in which the 
minerals are largely identified by their physical properties. Open to all 
students. fFour hours a week. 

27. Lubrication. — A study of lubricants, bearings, and methods of 
lubrication. Two hours a week. First nine weeks. 



193 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



41. Analysis of Pharmaceutical Products. — The work includes 
the simpler methods of quantitative analysis, especially those methods 
of interest to students in Pharmacy. -\Eight hours a week, 

44. Paper Mill Appliances. — The study of simple mechanism is 
followed by the study of machines common to the manufacture of paper 
of various kinds. Two hours a week. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

52. Organic Chemistry. — The work is principally with the com- 
pounds of the aliphatic series. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory work. 
Open to those who have taken Course 11. Three hours class room; 
iff our hours laboratory work a week. 

53. Organic Chemistry. — A continuation of Course 52. The work 
is chiefly in the aromatic series. Three hours a week. 

54. Organic Analysis. — The methods for the quantitative deter- 
mination in organic substances of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, sulphur, 
and the halogens. Open to those who have completed Courses 52 and 
53. \Four hours a week. 

55. Cellulose. — A laboratory course in which are studied the chem- 
ical reactions and characteristics of the commoner forms of cellulose. 
^Four hours a week. 

57. Organic Preparations. — The work consists in the preparation 
and study of typical organic compounds. This course must be preceded 
by Courses 52, 53. "[Six hours a week. 

58. Dyeing. — The practical application of dyes to cotton, wool, 
and silk. ^Fifteen hours a week for two weeks. 

60. Elementary Quantitative Analysis. — An introductory course 
illustrating the fundamental principles of gravimetric and volumetric 
methods. Open to students who have had Course 11. \Ten hours a 
week. 



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COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 



61, 62. Volumetric Analysis. — The student is made familiar with 
the common methods of volumetric analysis in addition to the simpler 
volumetric methods used in Course 60 which is a prerequisite. -[Four 
hours a week, either semester. 

63. Quantitative Analysis. — Analysis of alloys, minerals, etc 
Both gravimetric and volumetric methods are used. Open to students 
who have taken Course 60. -\Eight hours a week. 

64. Assaying. — The fire assay of typical ores for gold and silver. 
"\Four hours a week. 

66. Water Analysis. — The analysis of water is studied both from 
the sanitary and from the industrial standpoint. Open to students who 
have taken Course 60. \Four hours a week. 

67. Electro-Analysis. — The electrolytic methods of quantitative 
analysis for copper, nickel, lead, and similar determinations. Open to 
students who have taken Course 60. ~\Four hours a week. 

68. Chemical Calculations. — The calculation of the results of 
chemical analyses by the use of graphic schemes, slide rules, factors 
and tables. Methods of changing routine analytic work so that the 
calculations may be simplified. The use of density tables as used com- 
mercially. Two hours a week. 

70. Fuel and Gas CALCULATiONS.--The methods of calculating the 
heat value of a coal, the constant of a calorimeter, the heat losses of a 
furnace, and similar problems. Two hours a week. Last nine weeks. 

71, 72. Physical Chemistry. — This course is devoted to the study 
of some of the more important principles and methods of physical 
chemistry in its several branches. Lectures and recitations. Open to 
students who have completed Chemistry 60, Mathematics 13, and Physics 
1, 2, 4. Three hours a week, fall semester; two hours a week, spring 
semester. 

74. Physical-Chemical Methods. — Determination of molecular 
weights ; the study of solutions through conductivity and other meth- 
ods ; rate of reaction and chemical equilibrium; potential and electro- 



195 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



motive force ; calorimetry ; and the use of the more important instru- 
ments, such as ref ractometer, polariscope, and spectroscope. "\Six hours 
a week. 

75. Metallurgy of Iron and Steel. — The occurrence, methods of 
extraction, properties, and alloys of iron. Open to students who have 
completed Courses 1, 2, 5, 6 or 3, 4, 5, 6. Two hours a week. 

76. Metallurgy of the Metals other than Iron. — A course sim- 
ilar to Course 75. The metals other than iron and steel are studied. 
Open to students who have completed Course 11. Two hours a week. 

77. Industrial Chemistry. — General processes of technical chem- 
istry, and selected topics, including the principal manufactured products 
of special interest. Lectures and recitations. As a part of this course 
an inspection trip is made to manufacturing plants of a chemical nature 
in New England. The expense of this trip the last few years has varied 
from $15 to $25 a year. Open to students who have completed Courses 
11, 52, 53, 60. Three hours a week. 

81. Paper. — A lecture course on paper and the various processes of 
present day paper making. Open to those who have completed Courses 
11, 52. Two hours a week. 

82. Paper Manufacture. — A laboratory course in which paper 
machinery will be studied and paper of various kinds will be made. This 
course should be preceded by Course 81. fFour hours a week. 

83. The Making of Pulp. — A laboratory course in paper pulp mill 
chemistry. The work taken up is that ordinarily falling to the chemist 
of a pulp mill of either the soda, sulphate, or sulphite type. Open to 
students who have completed Course 60. ^Four hours a week. 

84. Pulp. — A lecture course on the processes of manufacturing 
paper pulp. The uses of pulp other than in the manufacture of paper 
will also be discussed. Two hours a week. 

86. Bleaching of Pulp. — A laboratory course dealing with the 
methods of bleaching various kinds of pulp. Open to those who have 
taken Courses 82, 83. fFour hours a week. Last nine weeks. 



196 



COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 



87. Paper Testing. — The testing of paper for bursting strength, 
tensile strength, stretch, crumpling, etc. Also the methods for estimating 
the kinds and percentages of the various fibers present in a sample of 
paper. fFour hours a week. 

88. Paper Coloring. — A laboratory course on mordants, dye-stuffs 
and their applications, testing, retention, matching of shades, etc. Open 
to those who have completed Course 55. fFour hours a week. 

89. Paper Problems. — A laboratory course for the study of selected 
processes of paper manufacture, as beating, sizing, loading, finishing, 
etc. Course 82 is a prerequisite. fFour hours a week. 

90. History of Chemistry. — One hour a week. 

93, 94. Chemical Literature. — Reviews and discussions of leading 
articles appearing in current English, German, and French chemical 
literature. Open to juniors majoring in the department who have com- 
pleted the required work in modern languages. One hour a week, either 
semester. 

96. Mineralogy. — Open to those who have completed Course 60. 
"fFour hours a week. 

98, 99. Thesis Work. — The thesis will embody the result of the 
study of a special problem in the laboratory. This problem will partake 
of the nature of original research and will ordinarily require not less 
than ften hours a week. 



Primarily for Graduates 

101. Advanced Organic Chemistry. — A series of lectures on special 
topics in organic chemistry. Open to students who have completed 
Courses 52, 53. Three hours a week. 

102, 103. Qualitative Analysis. — This course is similar to Course 
11, but deals with organic compounds. It must be preceded by Courses 
52, 53. "\Four hours a week, either semester. 



197 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



104. Technical Analysis. — An advanced course in the analysis of 
ores and industrial products. Open to students wh« have completed 
Courses 60, 63. "fEight hours a week. 

105. Electrochemistry. — A lecture course on the general principles 
of the subject and its applications in industrial work. Open to students 
who have completed Courses 71, 72. Two hours a week. 

106. Inorganic Problems. — Two hours a week. 

Laboratory fees covering general chemicals, gas, etc., are as follows: 
Course 27, $1; Courses 20, 66, 86, 96, $2; Courses 15, 17, 54, 55, 61, 62, 
87, $3; Courses 82, 83, 89, 101, 103, $4; Courses 5, 6, 16, 41, 52, 74, 
98, 99, $5; Courses 57, 63, 104, $6; Courses 11, 60, $8; Course 13, $10. 

Broken apparatus and special chemicals are paid for at the chemical 
supply room by use of a "breakage card" obtained from the Treasurer's 
office. The portion of this card which has not been used will be re- 
deemed at the end of the semester. 

For courses in biological and agricultural chemistry, see description 
of courses given by the Department of Biological and Agricultural 
Chemistry. 

Summer Term 

Professor Easley; Assistant Professor Ashley; 
Assistant Professor Durgin. 

3s. General Chemistry. — A course of lectures and demonstrations on 
elementary chemistry. No previous knowledge of the subject is 
assumed. The course deals chiefly with the non-metals. 

4s. General Chemistry. — A continuation of Course 3s dealing chiefly 
with the metals. 

7s. The Teaching of Chemistry. — A course especially for teachers. 



198 



COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 



17s. Gas and Fuel Analysis. — This work consists in the analysis of 
fuel and flue gases and the determination of the proximate con- 
stituents and heating values of the more common fuels. Ten 
hours of laboratory work each week. 

51s. Organtc Chemistry. — This is a general introductory course in the 
subject open to those who have had the freshman course in gen- 
eral chemistry or its equivalent. It is generally, though not 
necessarily, accompanied by laboratory work in the subject 

73s. Physical Chemistry. — Lectures on selected chapters of the sub- 
ject touching upon the following phases: molecular structure, 
the mass law, the theories of solution and their applications, 
especially along the line of electro-chemistry. 

91s. Inorganic Preparations. — A laboratory course in the purification 
and preparation of typical inorganic compounds. Ten hours of 
laboratory work each week. 

Laboratory Work in general chemistry, qualitative analysis, quantitative 
analysis, physical chemistry, and organic chemistry will be ar- 
ranged according to the needs of those attending the Summer 
Term. 

Graduate Work. — Attention is called to the courses that may be taken 
for graduate credit by those who already have a bachelor's 
degree (Courses 51s, 73s, 91s, 92s, and several of the courses 
indicated under "Laboratory Work"). It is the custom of the 
department to vary from year to year the courses offered in such 
a way that a student attending several successive summers will 
be able to complete the work necessary for a Master's degree. 
The fact that a considerable part of this work is of a laboratory 
character enables it to be varied in order and character to suit 
the needs of the individual student. 



199 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Professor Boardman; Professor Brown; Associate Professor Sprague; 
Assistant Professor Lyon ; Acting Assistant Professor 
Kingman ; Mr. Graham ; Mr. Small 

For undergraduates only 

1. Plane Surveying. — Recitations, lectures, and field work. The 
recitations and lectures cover the general theory of plane surveying; 
description of surveying equipment, and the adjustment of the instru- 
ments ; use of the chain, tape, compass, transit, and level, and other 
surveying operations. The field work consists of practice in the use of 
the chain, tape, compass, transit, level, and other surveying equipment. 
Required of all students in the Departments of Civil Engineering and 
Forestry. (Subdivision of field and recitation work is determined by the 
instructor. The work shall be the equivalent of twenty-seven periods 
of recitations or lectures and fifty-four periods of field work.) 

2. Plotting. — This course consists chiefly of map drawing from 
field notes, by the different methods in common use. Course 1 is pre- 
requisite. *Six hours a week. First twelve weeks. 

3. Plane Surveying. — A course similar to the recitations and lec- 
tures in Course 1. Given to students in the Departments of Mechanical 
and Electrical Engineering. Two hours a week. 

4. Field Work in Surveying. — A continuation of the field work in 
Course 1. This course consists of original surveys, problem work, ad- 
justment of instruments, note keeping, etc. Course 1 is prerequisite. 
*Six hours a week. Last six weeks. 

5. Field Work in Surveying. — The use of the chain, compass, tran- 
sit, and level. Required of all students in the Departments of Mechanical 
Engineering and Electrical Engineering. Given in connection with 
Course 3 but not with Course 1. *Six hours a week. First six weeks. 

6. Railroad Curves. — A course of recitations and lectures investi- 
gating the geometry of railroad curves, switches, and turnouts. Course 
1 or 3 is prerequisite. Three hours a week. First twelve weeks. 



200 



COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 



8. Railroad Field Work. — This course consists of practice in run- 
ning in railroad curves and turnouts. A general application of the the- 
ories of Course 6. Course 5 or Course 6 is prerequisite, -fSix hours a 
week. Last six weeks. 

20. Masonry Construction. — A course including the discussion of 
stone and brick masonry; cement and their tests; mortar; plain and 
reinforced concrete ; foundations ; pneumatic caissons ; culverts, bridge 
piers, and abutments. Two hours a week. 

21. Railroad Field Work. — The survey for a railroad about two 
miles in length. The preliminary and location surveys are made, includ- 
ing running in the curves, obtaining the topography, establishing the 
grade, and setting the slope stakes. Courses 4, 6, 8, or Courses 4, 27 
are prerequisites. *Six hours a week. First nine weeks. 

22. Advanced Surveying. — This course consists of lectures, read- 
ings, and recitations on the theory and practice of base line measurement, 
triangulation, precise leveling, topographical surveying, the use of the 
plane table, and the theory and application of least squares. It is a prep- 
aration for Course 24. Course 21 is prerequisite. Two hours a week. 

23. Railroad Office Work. — The office work of mapping the notes 
taken in Course 21, including the calculation of the earth work. Courses 
2, 21 are prerequisites. *Six hours a week. Last nine weeks. 

24. Summer Field Work. — This course consists of the practical ap- 
plication in the field and in the office of the principles given in Course 
22. The work is given during the two weeks following Commencement. 
Course 22 is prerequisite. 

25. Railroad Construction. — Recitations and lectures on the field 
and office practice of staking out and computing amount of excavation 
and fill ; borrow-pits ; haul ; methods and materials of railroad con- 
struction; subgrade; roadbed; track and track work. Course 6 is pre- 
requisite. Two hours a week. 

26. Hydraulics. — Fundamental data; hydrostatics; theoretical hy- 
draulics ; instruments and observations ; theoretical and actual flow 



201 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



through orifices, weirs, tubes, pipes, and conduits ; dynamic pressure of 
water. Three hours a week. 

27. Simple Curves and Earthwork. — A lecture course on the the- 
ory and practice of simple railroad curves, and on the field and office prac- 
tice of staking out and computing earthwork. Given to students outside 
of the Department of Civil Engineering who desire to take Courses 21 
and 23. Courses 1, 4 or Courses 3, 5 are prerequisites. One hour a 
week. 

28. Structures. — The theory of the simple beam; loads and reac- 
tions; vertical shear; bending moment; influence lines. The object of 
this course is to give the student a drill in finding vertical shear and 
bending moment under different systems of loadings, and to apply the 
same to the design of simple beams, also to familiarize him with the 
use of steel hand books, various tables, and the slide rule. Class room, 
two hours a week. Drawing room, two hours a week. 

29. Municipal Engineering. — The design of city street plans, com- 
parative studies of pavements under different conditions of climate traf- 
fic, etc., general principles of sewer design, and construction and sewerage 
disposal; a study of city sanitation and water supply. Course 1 or 3 is 
prerequisite. Two hours a week. 

31. Roads and Trails. — This course consists of lectures on the 
practice of building and maintaining trails and ordinary types of roads, 
and includes the design of simple beams and girders. For Forestry stu- 
dents. One hour a week. 

33. Foundations. — A short course in the fundamentals of design for 
different classes of foundations; bearing power of soils, manufacture 
of cement, mixing and testing of cement and concrete, cofferdams, pneu- 
matic caissons. Required of students in Mechanical and Electrical En- 
gineering. One hour a week. 

35. Hydraulics. — A short course which includes the main principles 
given in Course 26. Given to students in the Departments of Mechani- 
cal and Electrical Engineering. Two hours a week. 



202 



COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 



Thesis Work. The study of and report upon some original inves- 
tigation, or design. Time to be arranged. See regulations regarding 
degrees. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

51. Hydraulic Field Work. — The measurement of the flow of rivers 
is illustrated by the use of the current meter. The data thus obtained 
is used to plot the rating curves, etc. The measurements taken are re- 
ported to the U. S. G. Survey. The expenses of this course are paid 
by the students. Required of students taking Option 1. Course 26 
is prerequisite, "\Four hours a week. 

52. Hydraulic Engineering, — A continuation of Course 55. Course 
51 is prerequisite. Three hours a week. 

53. Hydraulic Field Work. — A short course similar to Course 51. 
Required of students taking Options 2 and 3. Course 26 is prerequisite. 
^Two hours a week. 

55. Hydraulic Engineering.' — Rainfall, evaporation, and stream 
flow ; the development and utilization of water power ; the development 
of the modern turbine; inspection of hydro-electrir plants- Lectures and 
recitations. Required of students electing Option 1. Course 26 is pre- 
requisite. Two hours a week. 

57. Structures. — A continuation of Course 28. The theory of 
stresses in framed structures, including the plate girder, bridge trusses, 
and roof trusses; reinforced concrete; the principles of designing. The 
object of this course is to train the student in the application of the 
principles of mechanics to the design of structures. Three hours a week. 

58. Structures. — A continuation of Course 57. This course in- 
cludes a study of the higher types of structures. Three hours a week. 

59. Designing. — This course takes up the design for some of the 
common types of steel structures, and the preparation of the shop draw- 
ings. Course 28 is prerequisite. ^Nine hours a week. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



60. Graphic Statics. — Class and drawing room work in the graph- 
ical determination of shear and bending moment, and the analysis of 
bridge and roof trusses by graphical methods. Course 57 is prerequisite. 
Two hours a week. 

62. Designing. — A continuation of Course 59. Course 57 is pre- 
requisite. fSix hours a week. 

63. Railroad Engineering. — A course discussing the economics of 
railroad location and operation. The railroad corporation, its rights and 
limitations ; traffic ; operating expenses ; the locomotive and its work ; 
distance ; curves ; grades. Required of students electing Option 2. 
Course 25 is prerequisite. Three hours a week. 

64. Railroad Engineering. — A course in railroad design. A map 
reconnaissance for a railroad about twelve to fifteen miles in length is 
made, applying the theories of Course 63. The final line is located, 
profile made, grades established, and drainage areas and culverts cal- 
culated. The rails, switch points, frogs, and ties for a turnout are 
designed. A railroad yard layout is computed and plotted. Required of 
students electing Option 2. Courses 23, 63 are prerequisites. "fSix hours 
a week. 

66. Railroad Engineering. — A course of lectures and recitations 
studying various railroad problems ; structures ; grade crossings and elim- 
ination ; yards and terminals ; signals and interlocking ; maintenance and 
betterment work as discussed in engineering periodicals. Required of 
students election Option 2. Course 63 as prerequisite. Two hours a 
week. 

67. Cement Laboratory. — This course consists of making the regu- 
lation commercial tests upon different samples of cement. A laboratory 
fee sufficient to cover the cost of materials used is charged. Required 
of students in Mechanical Engineering and in Civil Engineering. Course 
20 is prerequisite for students in Civil Engineering. The time varies. 

69. Highway Engineering. — The location, drainage, construction, 
and maintenance of pavements and country roads under various condi- 
tions of soil, climate, traffic, etc. ; highway economics, legislation and ad- 



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COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 



ministration. Required of students electing Option 3. Course 29 is 
prerequisite. Three hours a week. 

70. Road Materials Laboratory.— Physical and chemical tests 
of sand, gravel, stone, brick, wood block, bituminous compounds, and 
other road materials. Course 29 and Chemistry 1 or 3, 2 or 4, 5, 6 are 
prerequisites. *Three hours a week. 

72. Highway Design. — Drawing room study of highway location 
and relocation including plans of proposed improvement and construction 
of five miles of highway. Detailed estimates and specifications for same. 
Required of students electing Option 3. Course 69 is prerequisite. fSix 
hours a week. 

74. Highway Engineering. — An advanced course of lectures and re- 
citations in highway economics, administration, and legislation; general 
highway engineering problems. Required of students electing Option 3. 
Course 69 is prerequisite. Two hours a week. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Professor Barrows; Assistant Professor Hilleg/.s; Assistant Profes- 
sor Harvey; Mr. Cheswell 

For undergraduates only 

1, 2. Elementary Electricity. — Fundamental laws and principles 
of electricity, series and parallel circuits, electrical instruments, electrical 
measurements. Recitations and problems. Two hours a week. 

5. Elements of Electrical Engineering. — Application of laws 
studied in Courses 1 and 2. The magnetic circuit, the fundamental study 
of electrical apparatus. Recitations and problems. Three hours a week. 

8. Laboratory Work. — Electrical measurements, operation and test- 
ing of direct current generators and motors. Application of the work of 
courses 1, 2, 5, 50. Laboratory fee $5.00. Four hours a week. 



205 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



30. Direct Current Machinery. — Electrical principles and applica- 
tions ; the production, distribution, and utilization of power from the 
standpoint of the mechanical and chemical engineer. Recitations and 
problems. Two hours a week. 

31. Alternating Currents. — Alternating current measurements and 
caclulations ; operation of generators and motors. Lectures, recitations, 
and problems. Two hours a week. 

33, 34. Electrical Laboratory. — These courses are based on Cours- 
es 30 and 31. Operation of direct current and alternating current gener- 
ators and motors ; electrical power measurements. Laboratory fee $5.00 
per semester. ^Four hours a week. 

35. Alternating Current Apparatus. — Alternating current meas- 
urements and the operation of alternating current machinery. Lectures, 
recitations, and problems. Tzvo hours a week. 

42. Electrical Power. — Electrical measurements ; the generation, 
transmission, and utilization of electrical power. Lectures, recitations, 
and problems. Two hours a week. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

50. Elements of Electrical Engineering. — A continuation of 
Course 5. Principles of construction, operation, and testing of direct 
current generators and motors ; general engineering problems. Lectures, 
recitations, and problems. Three hours a week. 

51. Alternating Currents. — Effect of alternating currents upon 
various electric circuits ; voltage ; current and voltage relations in induc- 
tive and capacity circuits; the theory, construction, and operation of 
apparatus and machinery. Lectures, recitations, and problems. Three 
hours a week. 

52. Advanced Alternating Currents. — A continuation of Course 
51. Polyphase apparatus; generation, transmission, distribution and utili- 
zation of polyphase power; problems involving previous courses. Lec- 
tures, recitations, and problems. Five hours a week, first nine weeks 



206 



COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 



53, 55. Electrical Design. — The design and construction of direct 
and alternating current machinery; relation of design to operating char- 
acteristic. Lectures and recitations, two hours a week. Calculations and 
design, four hours a week. 

54. Technical Reviews. — A study of some special phase of electri- 
cal engineering and the presentation of it to the class. One hour a week. 

56. Electrical Power Plants. — Electrical equipment of power 
plants; methods of control, switching, protection, lightning arresters; 
arrangement of station and substation machinery, apparatus, and switch- 
boards. Lectures and recitations. Five hours a week, last nine weeks. 

58. Electrical Transmission. — High voltage long distance trans- 
mission; transmission line phenomena; methods and practice of securing 
most reliable service. Lectures, recitations, and problems. Two hours a 
week. 

60. Wireless Telegraphy. — Fundamentals of wireless telegraphy 
and telephony. Detectors ; sending ; receiving ; tuning. Two hours a 
week. Given in 1917-18 and alternate years. 

61. Illuminating Engineering. — Different types of lamps; light, 
photometry, illumination calculations, and problems of interior and ex- 
terior illumination. Lectures, recitations, and problems. Two hours a 
week. 

63. Telephone Engineering.* — Principles of telephone apparatus 
and circuits ; telephone systems ; party lines, trunk lines ; central stations. 
Lectures and recitations. Two hours a week. 

64. Electric Railway Engineering. — Preliminary considerations 
in electric railway engineering; selection of proper equipment; car, bond, 
and transmission testing. Lectures, recitations, and problems. Tzvo 
hours a week. 

75, 76. Laboratory Work. — Alternating current measurements; op- 
erating, testing, and experimental work on power and lighting apparatus; 
alternating current instruments; generators, motors, transformers, syn- 



207 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



chronous converters, polyphase power measurements. Laboratory fee 
$5.00 per semester. Four hours a week. 

78. Inspection Trip. — About a week's trip visiting some of the 
electrical and industrial plants of New England. 

80. Thesis Work. — The study of and report upon some original 
report or design. Time to be arranged. See regulations regarding 
degrees. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Professor Sweetser; Associate Professor Lekberg; Assistant Profes- 
sor Taylor; Mr. Davee; Mr. Carter; Mr. Alexander 

For undergraduates only 

2. Woodworking. — Graded exercises in woodworking designed to 
make the student familiar with tools used in modern woodworking 
practice, and to give him experience in working from dimensioned draw- 
ings. Pattern work, consisting of the making of complete patterns and 
core boxes from drawings. Charge for materials $4.00. *Six hours a 
week. 

4. Woodworking. — A shorter course than Course 1, arranged for 
students in Agriculture and Chemical Engineering. Charge for mate- 
rials $4.00. *Four hours a week. 

5. Forge Work. — Forging; welding; tool dressing. A set of lathe 
tools and cold chisels for use in machine shop is made by each student. 
Charge for material $5.00. *Three hours a week. 

7, 8. Machine Work. — Exercises in chipping and filing; lathe work; 
exercises on planer, shaper, and milling machines ; making cut gears, 
machinists' taps, etc. Course 6 is a prerequisite. Charge for materials 
$5.00. *Six hours a week. 

9, 10. Machine Work. — Shorter course than 7, 8, for electrical en- 
gineers. Charge for materials $5.00. *Four hours a week. 



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COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 



11. Foundry Work. — Foundry instruction is given in bench and 
floor molding, mixing of materials, core making, operation of cupolas, 
etc. Charge for materials $4.00. *Three hours a week. 

14. Power Generation and Application. — A course arranged for 
students in Forestry and Chemical Engineering. Fuels; steam boilers; 
steam and gas engines; locomotives; log haulers, etc. Two hours a 
week. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

55. Elements of Mechanical Engineering. — A course of lectures, 
supplemented by recitations, designed to familiarize the student with 
the mechanical apparatus of manufacturing and power plants, and with 
the elementary formulae and constants used in simple engineering cal- 
culations. One hour a week. 

59. Kinematical Drawing. — Supplementary to Course 56 which is a 
prerequisite. The drawings are of cams, gear teeth, and graphical stud- 
ies of kinematical problems. Three hours a week. 

56. Kinematics. — A study of motion in machine design; linkages, 
gears, cams, etc. Three hours a week. 

61. Materials of Engineering. — Properties of the metals; timber, 
rope; protective coatings and preservatives. Two hours a week. 

64a. Graphics. — A course given in connection with Course 64b. 
Classroom work. One hour a week. 

64b. Graphics. — A drawing room course supplementing Course 64a. 
The problems assigned include graphical determination of center of 
gravity, bending moments of beams ; shear diagrams ; stresses in bridge 
members and roof trusses. *Three hours a week. 

66. Machine Design. — A study of the designing of machines; pro- 
portioning of parts for strength, rigidity, etc. Mechanics 5, 6 are pre- 
requisites. Three hours a week. 



209 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



67. Machine Design. — A continuation of Course 66, including the 
execution of the design of some typical machines. Course 66 is a pre- 
requisite. *Six hours a week. 

68. Valve Gears. — A study of the principal steam engine valve 
motions ; construction and use of valve diagrams ; solution of practical 
problems in the drawing room. Two hours a week. 

70. Mechanical Laboratory. — Elementary experimental work such 
as calibration of instruments, steam calorimetry, use of steam and gas 
engine indicators, mechanical efficiency tests, etc. Laboratory charge 
$2.00. fTwo hours a week. 

71. Mechanical Laboratory. — Tests of materials, hydraulic test- 
ing, valve settings, steam and gasoline engines. Laboratory charge $3.00. 
fThree hours a week. 

72. Mechanical Laboratory. — Tests of condensers, boilers, air 
compressors, fans, pumps, etc. Laboratory charge $3.00. \Three hours a 
week. 

74. Mechanical Laboratory. — A course arranged for students in 
Civil Engineering. Testing of strength of materials ; measurement of 
flow of water over weirs through orifices and nozzles ; calibration of 
venturi meters. Laboratory charge $2.00. "\Two hours a week. 

75. Mechanical Laboratory. — A course arranged for students in 
Chemical Engineering. Calibration of instruments; tests of engines; 
measurement of flow of water; tests of lubricants. Laboratory charge 
$2.00. "\Three hours a week. 

77. Mechanical Laboratory. — A course arranged for students in 
Electrical Engineering. Calibration of instruments ; testing of strength 
of materials ; testing of steam engines, gas engines, hydraulic testing. 
Laboratory charge, $2.00. "fThree hours a week. 

79. Heat Engineering. — Fundamental theories of gas and steam, 
with illustrative problems of practical form. Laws of thermodynamics; 
laws of gases ; saturated and superheated vapors ; Carnot's, Rankine's, 
and actual steam engine cycles; use of steam tables; steam calorimetry; 



210 



COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 



etc. Mathematics 8 and Physics 1 and 2 are prerequisites. Three hours 
week. 

80. Heat Engineertng. — The same as Course 79. Given in the 
tpring term to Electrical Engineers. Three hours a week. 

82. Heat Engineering. — Steam engines ; flow of steam ; air com- 
pressors ; flow of air; refrigeration. Course 79 is a prerequisite. Three 
hours a week. 

83. Heat Engineering. — Types and details of steam boilers, en- 
gines, and auxiliary machinery. Fuels ; combustion ; efficiency factors 
of the steam boiler plant; heat losses in the steam engine; compound 
steam engines ; refrigeration. For students in Electrical Engineering a 
study of steam turbines and gas engine cycles and gas producer principles 
is included. Course 80 is a prerequisite. Three hours a week. 

84. Heat Engineering. — A continuation of courses 80 and 83 deal- 
ing with steam engines ; steam turbines ; air compressors ; refrigerating 
machinery, and gas engines ; considerations affecting the design and effi- 
ciency of operation of heat motors. Two hours a week. 

88. Engine Design. — A study of problems affecting the design of a 
steam or gas engine with regard to their bearing on general machine 
design. An engine is partially designed in the drawing room. Courses 
67 and 83 are prerequisite. *Six hours a week. 

91. Heating and Ventilation. — Course 80 is a prerequisite. Two 
hours a week. First fourteen weeks. 

94. Hydraulic Machinery. — Hydraulic turbine; water wheels; var- 
ious features of hydraulic power plant development. Three hours a week. 
First nine weeks. 

96. Seminar. — Preparation, presentation, and discussion of papers 
on leading engineering topics. One hour a week. 

98. Factory Organization and Management. — Lectures and as- 
signed reading bearing upon various types of organization for industrial 



211 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



enterprises ; planning and equipping of factory plants ; systems of man- 
agement; factory design and construction. Two hours a week. 

Inspection Trip. — A visiting trip of one week's duration to various 
manufacturing and power plants. This trip is open only to seniors who 
are eligible for graduation. The expense to each student is in the neigh- 
borhood of thirty-five dollars. A complete schedule of the trip is pre- 
arranged and a memberof the department staff is in charge of the party. 
Excuse from this trip may be obtained only upon application to a special 
committee. 

Thesis. — The results of some original investigation or design pre- 
sented in proper form. The subject should be selected early in the fall 
semester of the senior year. See regulations regarding degrees. 

MECHANICS AND DRAWING 

Professor Weston; Associate Professor Grover; Mr. Farnham ; Mr. 
Leighton; Mr. Hull 

For undergraduates only 

1. Drawing. — Instruction and practice in technical freehand draw- 
ing and lettering, in the care of drawing instruments and their use in 
elementary problems involving right lines, circles, conic sections, and 
orthographic projections. *Six hours a week. 

2. Drawing. — A continued study of the methods of orthographic 
projection, isometric projection, and oblique projection, accompanied 
by instruction and practice in the making of working drawings and 
tracings. *Six hours a week. 

3. Drawing. — The elementary principles and problems of descriptive 
geometry, including intersections and developments. *Six hours a week. 

4. Drawing. — A continued study of the making of working draw- 
ings of simple machines, together with instruction and practice in making 
titles for the same. *Six hours a week. 



212 



COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 



9, 10. Drawing. — A course designed especially for students in Agri- 
culture and for non-engineers. It combines the fundamental principles 
of Course 1 and Course 2. *Three hours a week. 

11. Mechanics. — An elementary course in the fundamental prin- 
ciples of statics, kinematics and kinetics, with applications to practical 
problems involving frictional resistance, the transmission of power by 
belts, and the stresses and strains in beams, trusses, shafts, and columns. 
For students in Chemical Engineering. Three hours a week. 

For graduates and undergraduates 

51, 52. Mechanics. — The fundamental principles of statics, kine- 
matics, and kinetics, with applications to practical problems ; exercises 
in finding center of gravity and moment of inertia ; the study of stresses 
and strains in bodies subject to tension, compression, and shearing; the 
common theory of beams, including shearing force, bending moment, and 
elastic curves ; torsional stresses and theories of stress in long columns. 
Five hours a week. 

Primarily for graduates 

101. Advanced Mechanics. — General principles of kinematics, stat- 
ics, and kinetics ; the mathematical theory of elasticity ; the theory of the 
potential function with applications to problems in gravitation, hydro- 
mechanics, etc. Two hours a week. 

102. Advanced Mechanics. — A continuation of Course 101. Three 
hours a week. 

PHARMACY 

Professor Jarrett; Doctor Glancy 

2. Organic Pharmacognosy. — Macroscopic and microscopic study 
of organic drugs ; identification, collection, and selection ; active prin- 
ciples. Four hours a week. 

3. Materia Medica. — The physical, chemical, physiological, and 
therapeutical properties of medicines ; their doses ; poisons and antidotes. 
Three hours a week. 

213 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



4. Inorganic Pharmacognosy. — Macroscopic study of inorganic 
drugs, tests, etc Two hours a week. 

7. Pharmaceutical Chemistry. — Chemical formulae; principles; 
chemical reactions; equations, with special reference to pharmaceutical 
processes. Three hours a week. 

9. Pharmaceutical Arithmetic. — The arithmetic pertaining to the 
science and art of pharmacy ; special emphasis placed on the metric sys- 
tem in all of its practical details ; the accurate use of the various current 
weights and measures. Three hours a week. 

11. Pharmaceutical Latin. — The Latin pertaining to pharmacy; 
such essentials of inflection and syntax are taught as will serve the 
practical purpose of enabling the student to read prescriptions with 
ease and intelligence. Two hours a week. 

13. Theoretical Pharmacy. — The exposition of the principles upon 
which pharmaceutical operations are based. This includes the study 
of pharmacopoeias, dispensatories, etc. ; weights and measures ; specific 
gravity; pharmaceutical uses of heat; extemporaneous pharmacy; the 
principles of dispensing, etc. Three hours a week. 

14. Pharmacopoeia. — A complete review of the pharmacopoeia with 
special reference to the chemical and pharmaceutical principles involved 
in the tests and preparations. Five hours a week. 

16, 17. Laboratory Pharmacy (Manufacturing). — The prepara- 
tion of the most important U. S. P. galenicals and such additional U. S. 
P. and N. F. preparations as the time will permit, selecting the latter 
from those which require skill and careful manipulation. -[Eight hours 
a week. 

18. Laboratory Pharmacy (Dispensing). — This course teaches the 
compounding of medicine. The time is so arranged as to give a liberal 
number of hours for the actual work in the compounding of prescrip- 
tions. Incompatibilities, how to overcome them, etc. The work includes 
the preparation of solutions, mixtures, emulsions, pills, capsules, powders, 
cachets, tablets, tablet triturates, troches, ointments, plasters, supposi- 
tories, etc. ^Twelve hours a week. 



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COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 



20. Prescriptions. — This course includes the abbreviations and 
symbols used ; reading, labeling, checking, and filing. Critical examina- 
tion of prescriptions from actual files, with reference to principles, and 
to physiological, pharmaceutical, and chemical incompatibilities; doses; 
methods and order of compounding, etc. Three hours a week. 

22. Advanced Laboratory (Manufacturing). — Manufacture of 
toilet preparations, etc. fFour hours a week. 

51. Urinalysis and Toxicology. — The analysis of urine and the 
detection of the most common poisons. Two hours a week. 

54. Pharmacy Readings. — Current pharmacy literature: research 
and reference readings ; abstracting ; reports and theme writing on var- 
ious subjects pertaining to pharmacy. One hour a week. 

58. Commercial Pharmacy. — Trade or commerce in pharmeceuti- 
cal products. It includes bookkeeping, business correspondence, commer- 
cial and business law, and business practice. Two hours a week. 



215 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



REQUIRED COURSES 



MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

Professor Clark 

Of the following scheduled Courses 1 to 4 inclusive are required of 
all freshmen and sophomores with the exception of students in the one- 
year Pre-Medical Course. Students who are physically disqualified are 
also excused. Courses 5 to 8 inclusive are elective for juniors; and 9 
to 12 are elective for seniors. 

The required courses cover two years' instruction as laid down in 
War Department orders. For convenience in arranging the schedule, 
freshmen and sophomores are united in this instruction. Only Courses 
1, 2 or 3, 4 will be given in the same year, Course 1 alternating with 
Course 2, and Course 2 with Course 4. It is necessary for each student 
to complete all four of these courses. 

The elective courses are so scheduled that juniors and seniors may 
have the privilege of advanced theoretical military instruction in addi- 
tion to the courses required for cadet officers. By action of the faculty, 
it is provided that for any junior or senior satisfactorily completing 
either Courses 5, 6, 9, or 10, as a cadet captain commanding a company, 
or as a cadet field officer, academic credit of four hours a week may be 
granted. 

1. Military Art — 

(a) Practical 

U. S. infantry drill regulations, to include the schools 
of the soldier, squad, and company, in close order 
and extended order; indoor rifle practice. 

(b) Theoretical 

Lectures on military organization, methods, map reading; 
the service of security; personal hygiene. 
Three hours a zveek (counting one hour credit) 



216 



REQUIRED COURSES 



2. Military Art — 

(a) Practical 

U. S. infantry drill regulations, to include the school of 
the battalion in close and extended order, and cere- 
monies; indoor rifle practice. 

(b) Theoretical 

The service of information; combat; military history 

and policy. 

Three hours a week (counting one hour credit) 

3. Military Art — 

(a) Practical 

The same as Course 1 (a). 

(b) Theoretical 

U. S. infantry drill regulations, to include the school of 
the company ; small arms firing regulations ; lectures. 
Three hours a week (counting one hour credit) 

4. Military Art — 

(a) Practical 

The same as Course 2 (a). 

(b) Theoretical 

U. S. infantry drill regulations, to include the school of the 
battalion, and ceremonies ; military hygiene and first 
aid. 
Three hours a week (counting one hour credit) 

5. Military Art — 

(a) Practical 

Duties consistent with rank as cadet officers in connec- 
tion with Courses 1 (a) or 3 (a). 

(b) Theoretical. Course 7. 

Five hours a week (counting three hours credit) 

6. Military Art — 

(a) Practical 

Duties consistent with rank as cadet officers in connection 
with Course 2 (a) or 4 (a). 

(b) Theoretical. Course 8. 

Five hours a week (counting three hours credit) 



217 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



7. Military Art — 

Minor tactics field orders ; administration, preparation of 
papers. Two hours a week (counting two hours 
credit) 

8. Military Art — 

Minor tactics, continued; property accountability, requi- 
sitions and returns ; manual of interior guard duty. 
Two hours a week (counting two houis credit) 

9. Military Art — 

(a) Practical 

Duties consistent with rank as cadet officers in connec- 
tion with Courses 1 (a) or 3 (a). 
Five hours a week (counting three hours credit) 

10. Military Art — 

(a) Practical 

Duties consistent with rank as cadet officers in connec- 
tion with Courses 2 (a) or 4 (a). 

(b) Theoretical. Course 12. 

Five hours a week (counting three hours credit) 

11. Military Art — 

Tactical problems ; the arms combined ; map maneuvers ; 
court-martial procedure. Strategy. 
Two hours a week (counting two hours credit) 

12. Military Art — 

Problems in mobilization and supply; American cam- 
paigns; the rifle in war. 
Two hours a week (counting two hours credit) 

PHYSICAL CULTURE AND ATHLETICS 

Professor Young; Doctor McCarty 

1. Physical Training. — Class formation and figure marching; set- 
ting-up drills ; free-arm and calisthenics movement : elementary dumb- 



218 



REQUIRED COURSES 



bell, wand, and apparatus exercises. 
practice a week. 



One hour lecture and *two hours 



2. Physical Training. — Intermediate and advanced class exercises 
and combination apparatus work. One hour lecture and *two hours prac- 
tice a week. 

3. Physical Training. — An elective advanced course. *Two hours 
gymnasium and two hours lecture. 

4. Physical Training. — A continuation of Course 3. *Two hours 
gymnasium and two hours lecture. 

5. Practical Hygiene. — Two hours a week. 



6. 

week. 



Practical Hygiene. — A continuation of Course 5. Two hours a 



7, 8. Physical Training. — A course for all women students of the 
first year and for students of second year Home Economics. Class 
formation ; free exercises ; elementary dumb-bell, Indian club, wand 
drills; folk-dancing and games. Attention is given to first principles of 
deportment. Three hours a week. 



219 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



MAINE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT 
STATION 



STATION STAFF 



Charles Dayton Woods, Sc. D. 
James Monroe Bartlett, M. S. 
Warner Jackson Morse, Ph. D. 
Raymond Pearl, Ph. D. 
Frank Macy Surface, Ph. D. 
Edith Marion Patch, Ph. D. 
Herman Herbert Hanson, M. S. 
Maynie Rose Curtis, Ph. D. 
Royden Lindsay Hammond 
John Rice Miner, B. A. 
Jacob Zinn, Agr. D. 
Glen Blaine Ramsay, A. M. 
John Howard Perry 
William Raymond Rich, B. S. 
Walter Waitstill Webber, B. S. 
Charles Harry White, Ph. C. 
Walter Edson Curtis 



Director 

Chemist 

Plant Pathologist 

Biologist 

Biologist 

Entomologist 

Associate Chemist 

Assistant Biologist 

Seed Analyst and Photographer 

Computer 

Assistant Biologist 

Assistant Plant Pathologist 

Assistant Chemist 

Assistant Chemist 

Assistant Chemist 

Scientific Aid 

Scientific Aid 



GOVERNMENT OF THE STATION 

By authority of the trustees the affairs of the Station are considered 
by the Station Council (see page 6), composed of the President of the 
University, three members of the Board of Trustees, the Director of 
the Station, the heads of the various departments of the Station, the 
Dean of the College of Agriculture, the Commissioner of Agriculture, 
and one member each from the State Pomological Society, the State 



220 



EXPERIMENT STATION 



Grange, the State Dairymen's Association, the Maine Live Stock Breed- 
ers' Association, and the Maine Seed Improvement Association. The rec- 
ommendations of the Council are referred to the trustees for final ac- 
tion. The Director is the executive officer of the Station and the other 
members of the staff carry out the lines of research that naturally come 
under their departments. 

INCOME 

The income of the Station for the year 1916-17 will probably be about 
$60,000 from the following sources : Federal government, Hatch and 
Adams funds, $30,000; State appropriations for animal husbandry in- 
vestigations and investigations upon Aroostook Farm, $5,000 each; 
sale of produce about $8,000 ; analyses for the Commissioner of Agricul- 
ture about $12,000. Thru appropriations to the university the State pro- 
vides for the cost of printing Station publications. This aggregates 
about $4,000 annually. 

OBJECT 

The purpose of the agricultural experiment stations is defined in the 
Act of Congress establishing them as follows : 

"It shall be the object and duty of said experiment stations to con- 
duct original researches or verify experiments on the physiology of 
plants and animals; the diseases to which they are severally subject, 
with the remedies for the same ; the chemical composition of useful 
plants at their different stages of growth ; the comparative advantages 
of rotative cropping as pursued under a varying series of crops ; the 
capacity of new plants or trees for acclimation ; the analysis of soils 
and water ; the chemical composition of manures, natural and artificial, 
with experiments designed to test their comparative effects on crops of 
different kinds ; the adaptation and value of grasses and forage plants ; 
the composition and digestibility of the different kinds of food for domes- 
tic animals ; the scientific and economic questions involved in the produc- 
tion of butter and cheese; and such other researches or experiments 
bearing directly on the agricultural industry of the United States as 
may in each case be deemed advisable, having due regard to the varying 
conditions and needs of the respective states or territories." 

The work that the Station can undertake from the Adams Act fund 
is more restricted, as the fund can "be applied only to paying the neces- 



221 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



sary expenses for conducting original researches or experiments bearing 
directly on the agricultural industry of the United States, having duo 
regard to the varying conditions and needs of the respective states and 
territories." 

EQUIPMENT 

Most of the Station offices and laboratories are in Holmes Hall, de- 
scribed on page 25. The Station is well equipped in laboratories and 
apparatus, particularly in the lines of biological, chemical, entomological, 
horticultural, pomological, plant pathological, and poultry investigations. 
It has extensive collections illustrating the botany and entomology of 
the State. It has a library of over 4,200 volumes comprising agricultural 
and biological journals and publications of the various experiment sta- 
tions. 

HIGHMOOR FARM 

The State Legislature of 1909 purchased a farm upon which the 
Maine Agricultural Experiment Station "shall conduct scientific investi- 
gations in orcharding, corn, and other farm crops." The farm is situated 
in the counties of Kennebec and Androscoggin, largely in the town of 
Monmouth. It is on the Farmington branch of the Maine Central Rail- 
road, two miles from Leeds Junction. A flag station, "Highmoor," is 
on the farm. 

The farm contains 225 acres, about 200 of which are in orchards, 
fields, and pastures. There are in the neighborhood of 3,000 apple trees 
upon the place which have been set from 20 to 30 years. Fields that are 
not in orchards are well adapted to experiments with corn, potatoes, and 
similar farm crops. The house has two stories with a large wing, and 
contains about fifteen rooms. It is well arranged for the Station offices 
and for the home of the farm superintendent. The barns are large, 
affording storage for hay and grain. The basement affords limited stor- 
age for apples, potatoes, and roots. 



AROOSTOOK FARM 

By action of the Legislatures of 1913 and 1915 a farm was purchased 
in Aroostook County for scientific investigations in agriculture to bo 
under "the general supervision, management, and control" of the Maine 



222 



EXPERIMENT STATION 



Agricultural Experiment Station. The farm is in the town of Presque 
Isle, about two miles south of the village, on the main road to Houlton. 
The Bangor and Aroostook railroad crosses the farm. A flag station, 
"Aroostook Farm," makes it easily accessible by rail. 

The farm contains about 275 acres, about half of which is cleared. 
The eight room house provides an office, and home for the farm super- 
intendent. The large barn affords storage for hay and grain and has a 
large potato storage house in the basement. 

INVESTIGATIONS 

The Station continues to restrict its work to a few important lines, 
believing that it is better for the agriculture of the State to study thoroly 
a few problems than to spread over the whole field of agricultural science. 
It has continued to improve its facilities and segregate its work in such 
a way as to make it an effective agency for research in agriculture. 
Prominent among the lines of investigation are studies upon the food 
of man and animals, the diseases of plants and animals, breeding of 
plants and animals, investigations in animal husbandry, orchard and field 
experiments, poultry investigations, and entomological research. 

INSPECTIONS 

The Commissioner of Agriculture is the executive of the laws regu- 
lating the sale of agricultural seeds, commercial feeding stuffs, com- 
mercial fertilizers, dairy products, drugs, foods, fungicides, and insecti- 
cides. The law requires the Commissioner to collect samples and have 
them analyzed at the Station. The law also requires the Director of the 
Station to make the analyses and publish the results. 

PUBLICATIONS 

The Station issues three series of publications: Bulletins, Official 
Inspections, and Miscellaneous Publications. 

The results of the work of investigation are published in part in scien- 
tific journals at home and abroad, in U. S. Department of Agriculture 
publications, and in bulletins of the Station. All of the more important 
and immediately practical studies are published in the Station Bulletins. 
The Bulletins for a year form a volume of 300 to 400 pages and together 
make up the Annual Report. Bulletins are sent to the press of the State, 



223 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



to exchanges, libraries, and scientific workers. Bulletins which contain 
matter of immediate value to practical agriculture are sent free to resi- 
dents of Maine whose names are on the permanent mailing list. 

The results of the work of inspection are printed in pamphlet form 
and are termed Official Inspections. About twelve such pamphlets, ag- 
gregating 150 to 200 pages, are printed annually, and are bound as an 
appendixwith the Annual Report. Official Inspectors are sent to dealers 
within the State; those that have to do with fertilizers, feeding stuffs, 
and seeds are sent to farmers, and those reporting food and drugs are 
sent to a list of several thousand women within the State. 

The Miscellaneous Publications consist of newspaper bulletins, cir- 
culars, and similar fleeting publications. From twenty to thirty are pub- 
lished each year and are sent to different addresses according to the 
nature of the subject matter. 

On request, the name of any resident of Maine will be placed on the 
permanent mailing list to receive either or both the Bulletins and Offi- 
cial Inspections as they are published. 



224 



SUMMER TERM 



SUMMER TERM 



The work of the Summer Term is coordinate with that of the re- 
mainder of the year. The majority of the courses offered are of college 
grade, and, when completed, entitle the student to full credit on the uni- 
versity books. There are no examinations for admission, and students 
are permitted to enter any class in which they may satisfactorily carry 
on the work. Before counting this work toward a collegiate degree, 
the entrance conditions must be met. 

Three classes of students may be benefited by the work of this term : 

1. Teachers in the high schools and grammar schools who desire to 
fit themselves for more advanced positions. 

2. Students who desire to anticipate work in their curricula, or 
who may have work in arrears. A student should be able to make one 
unit, the equivalent of a five hours' subject for eighteen weeks. 

3. Courses in physics, mathematics, Latin, and other subjects are 
offered covering the work of the high school. In this way a student 
who is slightly deficient at the end of the school year may prepare him- 
self for college. These courses give no credit on the university books. 

Courses of Study 

During the summer of 1916 courses were offered in the following 
subjects: Chemistry, Education, English, French, German, History, 
Horticulture, Latin, Mathematics, Physics, Sociology, and Spanish. 
These courses are described in connection with the courses offered at 
the university during the remainder of the year. 

DAILY ASSEMBLY 

Each morning except Saturdays and Sundays the faculty and students 
meet in the Chapel at 10.15 for a brief assembly. A short religious 



225 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



service is held, including a song service, and an address is given on 
some topic of current interest. 

LIBRARY 

Thruout the Summer Term, the university library reading rooms are 
open from 9 A. M. to 12 P. M. and from 2 P. M. to 5 P. M., daily, ex- 
cept Saturday afternoon and Sunday. The library privileges ordinarily 
accorded students, including the home use of books, are extended to 
students in the Summer Term. 



LABORATORIES AND OBSERVATORY 

The laboratories of the Departments of Physics and Chemistry are 
available for use of the students. There is ample provision for carry- 
ing on the various courses from the preparatory work to that of the 
graduate student. All necessary apparatus is supplied to the student 
without charge; a small charge is made to cover the cost of the articles 
used. The departments are well equipped with modern apparatus. 

The Observatory contains an eight-inch telescope, vertical circle, and 
other instruments of precision. The work of the Observatory will be 
explained by Professor Hart in an evening lecture. 



RECREATION 

The athletic field of the university is available for use. Certain 
afternoons from four to six are set aside each week for baseball games 
and other athletic events. A tennis tournament is organized for those 
interested. 

Under the management of a permanant committee appointed for that 
purpose, tramps, picnics, and longer trips to various places of interest 
will be arranged, as well as more informal occasions on the campus 
where the students have opportunity to meet each other and the mem- 
bers of the faculty. 

For the further entertainment of the Summer Term students and 
their friends, the gymnasium will be open one evening of each week, 
where music will be furnished and opportunity afforded for informal 
social intercourse. 



226 



SUMMER TERM 
EXPENSES 



Tuition 



For residents of Maine, $12.00. 

For residents of other states, $18.00. 

An additional charge of $1 an hour is made for registration in ex- 
cess of fifteen hours a week. 

Tuition covers all charges for instruction up to fifteen hours a week, 
use of library and laboratories, except a small additional fee covering 
cost of materials used in the laboratories. This fee must be paid upon 
registration. 

Rooms for Men 

There are two dormitories for men, Oak Hall and Hannibal Ham- 
lin Hall. Rooms may be obtained for $2.00 a week for one person or 
$2.50 with two in a room. In Hannibal Hamlin Hall there are a few 
higher priced rooms. 

Rooms for Women 

The dormitory used for women students in the Summer Term on the 
campus is Balentine Hall. The rates are $2.00 a week, one in a room, 
or $2.50 with two in a room. 

Meals 

In the dining room of Balentine Hall meals will be served for $5.00 a 
week. 

The University Inn, located in the village of Orono, is under univer- 
sity management and is open for summer students. Rooms in private 
families may be secured for those who prefer them. 

Men who wish to bring their families should write early. Special 
effort will be made to secure suitable accommodations for them. 



IN GENERAL 

Prospective students are invited to consult Dean J. S. Stevens, or any 
of the instructors, for further details regarding any of the courses, or 



227 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



upon any subject relating to the work. It is the wish of the authorities 
to offer such courses as will best appeal to the teachers of Maine, and 
others who desire to avail themselves of these privileges. 

If there should be a considerable demand for other studies than 
those named, arrangements will be made to provide for them as far as 
practicable. In case the registration for any course offered falls below 
a certain minimum, it may be withdrawn. The list of instructors and the 
courses outlined in this catalog were for the summer of 1916. Unim- 
portant changes are likely to be made in 1917. 

A Summer Term Bulletin announcing courses to be given in 1917, 
will be issued about March 1, 1917. A copy will be mailed upon applica- 
tion. 



228 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS 



GENERAL ASSOCIATION 

President, Allen W. Stephens, 1899, 120 West 57th St., New York, N. Y. 

Vice President, J. Harvey McClure, 1905, 49 Hammond St., Bangor 

Recording Secretary, Fremont L. Russell, 1885, Orono 

Alumni Secretary, Lowell J. Reed, 1907, Orono 

Treasurer, James A. Gannett 1908, Orono 

Necrologist, James N. Hart, 1885, Orono 

ADVISORY COUNCIL 

At Large 

Term Expires. 

Edward H. Kelly, 1890, 2 Fairmount Park, East, Bangor 1916 

C. Parker Crowell, 1898, 44 Central St., Bangor 1916 

George H. Hamlin, 1873, Orono 1917 

Albert H. Brown, 1880, Old Town 1917 

Louis C. Southard, 1875,601 Tremont Building, Boston, Mass. 1918 

Charles E. Oak, 1876, 39 Hammond St., Bangor 1918 

Perley B. Palmer, 1896, Orono 1919 

Allen W. Stephens, 1899, 120 West 57th St., New York, N. Y. 1919 

Paul L. Bean, 1904, State House, Augusta... 1920 

Charles C. Elwell, 1878, 71 College St., New Haven, Conn. 1920 

College of Agriculture 

Whitman H. Jordan, 1875, Geneva, N. Y _ „ 1915 

College of Arts and Sciences 

DeForest H. Perkins, 1900, City Hall, Portland 1917 



229 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

College of Law 
(Vacancy) 1916 

College of Technology 
George F. Black, 1886, 238 St. John St., Portland... 1918 

SPECIAL ASSOCIATIONS 

College of Law 

President, James M. Gillin, 1913, 12 Columbia Building, Bangor 
Vice President, Forrest B. Snow, 1909, Bluchill 
Secretary, Mark A. Barwise, 1913, 101 Third St., Bangor 
Treasurer, Charles H. Reid, Jr., 1903, 7 Hammond St., Bangor 

School and Teachers' Courses in Agriculture 

President, Walter S. Jones, 1912, State Hospital, Bangor 

Vice Presidents, George P. Fogg, 1908; Arthur W. Richardson, 1913 

Secretary-Treasurer, Perley F. Smith, 1912, R. F. D. 1, East Brownfield 

LOCAL ASSOCIATIONS 

Androscoggin Valley. — President, Walter L. Emerson, 1909; Secretary, 
Charles B. Hosmer, 1911, 64 Lisbon St, Lewiston 

Boston. — President, Elmer J. Wilson, 1917. 

Secretary, Wayland D. Towner, 1914, 120 Salem St., Maiden, Mass. 

Knox County. — President, A. P. Starrett, 1882; Secretary, R. S. Sher- 
man, 1906, Tillson Wharf, Rockland 

New York. — President, Albert E. Mitchell, 1875; Secretary, Ashton H. 
Hart, 1911, 161 Emerson PL, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Pacific. — President, George R. Sweetser, 1909; Secretary, Walter W. 
Black, 1907, 527 Taylor St., Portland, Ore. 

Penobscot Valley. — President, J. Harvey McClure, 1905; Secretary, Wil- 
liam R. Ballou, 1912, 50 Blackstone St., Bangor 

Pittsburgh. — President, J. Wilson Brown, 1899; Secretary, Carl D. 
Smith, U. S. Bureau of Mines, 40th and Butler Sts. 



230 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS 



Washington, D. C. — President, Lore A. Rogers, 1896; Secretary, Henry 

W. Bearce, 1906, Bureau of Standards 
Western. — President, Charles A. Morse, 1879; Secretary, Samuel B. 

Lincoln, ex-1915, 619 First National Bank Building, Chicago, 111. 
Western Maine. — President, Edwin J. Haskell, 1872; Secretary, Albert 

E. Anderson, 1909, Masonic Temple, Portland 



231 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



APPOINTMENTS 



Speakers at the Junior Exhibition 

Harold Pierce Andrews, Monmouth; Grace Bidwell Bristol, West 
Hartford, Conn.; Helen Lois Danforth, Bangor; Langdon Jackson Freese, 
Bangor; Gerald Coker Marble, Skowhegan; Alice Mildred Poore, Rob- 
binston. 

Members of Phi Kappa Phi 

Zella Elizabeth Colvin, Williamsburg, Indiana; Emery Davis Eddy, 
Bangor; Marie Frederica Foster, Bar Harbor; Archelaus Lewis Hamb- 
len, Gorham ; Stacy Clifford Lanpher, Foxcroft ; Fred Perley Loring, 
West Pownal ; Frances Marie Lougee, Winterport ; Walter Lee Mason, 
Orono; Earl Stephen Merrill, Orono; Alice Mildred Poore, Robbinston; 
Samuel Rudman, Bangor; Allen G Smith, Bluehill; Winfred Eugene 
Stoddard, Deer Isle; Omar Fred Tarr, Auburn; Gladys Thompson, 
Orono; Mary Evelyn Winship, Livermore Falls. 

Members of Tau Beta Pi 

1916 

Harold Wilhelm Coffin, Portland ; Erlon Victor Crimmin, Winterport ; 
Karl Moody Currier, Brewer; Walter Da\is Emerson, Orono; Everett 
Goss Ham, Foxcroft; Otis Carroll Lawry, Fairfield; Ansel Alva Pack- 
ard, Belfast; Samuel Rudman, Bangor; Allen G Smith, Bluehill; Omar 
Fred Tarr, Auburn; Roy Alva Wentzell, Livermore Falls. 

1917 

Gerald Coker Marble, Skowhegan; Clarence Llewellyn Smith, Vinal- 
haven ; Marshall Odell Smith, Yarmouth ; George Knowlton Wadlin, 



232 






APPOINTMENTS 



East Northport ; Harvey Cyrus Waugh, Levant ; Elwood Morton Wilbur, 
Sorrento. 

Members of Alpha Zeta 

1917 

Charles William Bayley, Wells; Leroy Naham Berry, South Bridg- 
ton ; Charles Edward Crossland, Lawrence, Mass. ; Earle Leslie Emery, 
Salisbury Cove; Daniel Emerson Green, Brewer; Daniel Clair Hutchin- 
son, Dover; Rudolph Stoehr, Sabattus ; Russel Vale Waterhouse, Kenne- 
bunk; Donald Stuart Welch, Norway; Lawrence Blanchard Wood, King- 
field. 

1918 

Lawrence Tilton Merriman, Harpswell Center; Ferdinand Josiah 
Penley, Lewiston; Carrol Coffin Reed, Hollis, New Hampshire; Willard 
Case Sisson, Hartford, Conn.; Lee Vrooman, Greenville. 

General Honors 

Charles Leon Blackman, Peak Island; Zelli Elizabeth Colvin, Wil- 
liamsburg, Indiana; George Franklin Eaton, Bangor; Emery Davis Eddy, 
Bangor; Marie Frederica Foster, Bar Harbor; Archelaus Lewis Hamb- 
len, Gorham ; Stacy Clifford Lanpher, Foxcrof t ; Fred Perley Loring, 
West Pownal ; Frances Marie Lougee, Winterport ; Walter Lee Mason, 
Orono ; Earl Stephen Merrill, Orono ; Alice Mildred Poore, Robbinstcn ; 
Harry Elwood Rollins, Bangor; Samuel Rudman, Bangor; Sarah Single- 
ton, Bangor; Allen G Smith, Bluehill; Winfred Eugene Stoddard, Deer 
Isle; Omar Fred Tarr, Auburn; Dorothy Thompson, Orono; Gladys 
Thompson, Orono; Mary Evelyn Winship, Livermore Falls. 

Seniors Who Have Satisfactorily Completed the Courses 
in Military Science 

Harold Wilhelm Coffin, Portland; Carroll Melbourne DeWitt, Brew- 
er; Omar Kelsey Edes, Dexter; Elwood Stuart Fraser, Peak Island; 
Archelaus Lewis Hamblen, Gorham; Donald Josiah Maclntire, Bidde- 
ford; Ansel Alva Packard, Belfast. 



233 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Organization of the University of Maine Regiment 

Frank S. Clark, Captain Coast Artillery Corps, U. S. Army, 
Professor of Military Science and Tactics 



Adjutant, commanding Head- 
quarters Co. 
Machine Gun Company 



Cadet Captain H. L. Jenkins 
Cadet Captain C. L. Stephenson 
Cadet 1st Lieutenant O. C. Turner 
Cadet 2nd. Lieutenant G. M. Carter 
Cadet 2nd. Lieutenant D. W. Norton 



First Battalion 

Cadet Major, N. F. Mank 

Adjutant, Cadet 1st Lieutenant L. T. Merriman 



Company A 



Company B 



Company C 



Company D 



Cadet Captain 
Cadet 1st Lieutenant 
Cadet 2nd Lieutenant 

Cadet Captain 
Cadet 1st Lieutenant 
Cadet 2nd Lieutenant 

Cadet Captain 
Cadet 1st Lieutenant 
Cadet 2nd Lieutenant 
Cadet 2nd Lieutenant 

Cadet Captain 
Cadet 1st Lieutenant 
Cadet 2nd Lieutenant 



G. C. Robinson 
R. C. Chapman 
W. E. Reynolds 

R. J. Travers 
F. O. Stephens 
M. L. Hill 

W. F. O'Donoghue 
W. C. Sisson 
H. B. Caldwell 
H. A. Ellsworth 

F. T. McCabe 
D. M. Libby 
S. B. Bubier 



234 



APPOINTMENTS 

Second Battalion 

Cadet Major, H. E. Watkins 

Adjutant, Cadet 1st Lieutenant J. H. Magee 



Company E 



Company F 



Company G 



Company H 



Cadet Captain 
Cadet 1st Lieutenant 
Cadet 2nd Lieutenant 

Cadet Captain 
Cadet 1st Lieutenant 
Cadet 2nd Lieutenant 

Cadet Captain 
Cadet 1st Lieutenant 
Cadet 2nd Lieutenant 



W. C. Barrett 
V. E. Abbott 
G. R. Bailey 

E. A. McLean 

M. S. Perkins 
E. T. Nealey 

R. M. Somers 
G. R. Stott 
G. C. Newell 



Cadet Captain 
Cadet 1st Lieutenant 
Cadet 2nd Lieutenant 

PRIZES AWARDED 



R. N. Atherton 
M. W. Wescott 
J. E. Speirs 



Kidder Scholarship, Henry Andrew Peterson, Portland. 

Western Alumni Association Scholarship, Charles Fernald Niles, 
Rumford. 

Pittsburgh Alumni Association Scholarship, Clarence Llewellyn 
Smith, Vinalhaven. 

Junior Exhibition Prizes, Helen Lois Danforth, Bangor, and Lang- 
don Jackson Freese, Bangor. 

Sophomore Essay Prizes, Thelma Louise Kellogg, Vanceboro, and 
Lee Vrooman, Greenville. 

Father Harrington Prize, Helen Loggie Stuart, Bangor. 

Holt Prizes, Charles William Ruffner, Arcadia, Pa., Lewis Herman 
Kriger, Portland, Guy Casley Palmer, Patten. 

Walter Balentine Prize, Ray Milo Carter, West Hawley, Mass. 

Franklin Danforth Prize, Fred Perley Loring, West Pownal. 

Kennebec County Prize, Harold Wilhelm Coffin, Portland. 

King Prize, Alice Mildred Poore, Robbinston. 

Pharmacy Prize, Frank Irving Hargreaves, Sanford. 

Wingard Cup, Harland Stimson Rowe, Springvale. 



235 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



COMMENCEMENT 



The Commencement exercises of 1916 were as follows: 

Saturday, June 10 

5.00 P. M. Annual Meeting of Phi Kappa Phi, the Library 

6.00 P. M. Annual Banquet of Phi Kappa Phi, Hannibal Hamlin Hall 

8.30 P. M. King Oratorical Prize Contest, the Chapel 

Sunday, June 11 

10.30 A. M. Baccalaureate Address, by Lemuel Herbert Murlin, D. D., 
LL.D., President of Boston University 

Monday, June 12 

9.00 A. M. "Planting of the Pine," by the Women of the Class of 

1916, the Campus 
10.00 A. M. "Fanchon the Cricket," by Women Students, the Gym- 
nasium 
2.00 P. M. Class Day Exercises, the Campus 

2.30 P. M. Meeting of the Alumni Advisory Council, the Library 
4.00 to 6.00 P. M. Open House at Fraternity Houses and the Women's 

Dormitories 
8.00 to 10.00 P. M. President's Reception, the Library 
9.00 P. M. Fraternity Reunions, the Fraternity Houses 

Tuesday, June 13 

10.00 A. M. Concert, by the Musical Clubs, the Gymnasium 
10.00 A. M. Annual Meeting of the College of Law Alumni Association, 
Stewart Hall 



236 



COMMENCEMENT 



2.30 P. M. Maine-Colby Baseball Game, Alumni Field 

4.30 to 6.30 P. M. Alumni Luncheon, the Gymnasium 

4.30 to 6.30 P. M. Alumnae Luncheon, the Chapel 

6.30 P. M. Annual Meeting of the General Alumni Association, the 

Chapel 
8.00 P. M. "Lelio and Isabella," by the Maine Masque, the Gymnasium 

Wednesday, June 14 

9.30 A. M. Commencement Exercises, the Campus; Address by Ham- 
lin Garland 
11.30 A. M. "Leavetaking," by the Class of 1916, the Campus 
12.00 M Commencement Dinner, the Gymnasium 

8.00 P. M. Commencement Ball, the Gymnasium. 



237 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

Bachelor of Science 

Donald Vince Atwater (in Biology) Fort Fairfield 

Charles Leon Blackman (in Animal Husbandry) Peak Island 

Horace Everett Boothby, Jr. (in Horticulture) Springfield, Vt. 

Arthur John Bower (in Animal Husbandry) Methuen, Mass. 

Llewellyn Morse Dorsey, (in Dairy Husbandry) Augusta 

James Carroll Elliott (in Dairy Husbandry) North Rumford 

Thomas Everett Fairchild (in Poultry Husbandry) Livermore Falls 

El wood Stuart Fraser (in Dairy Husbandry) Peak Island 

Roger Locke Gowell (in Dairy Husbandry) Poland 

Frank William Gray, Jr. (in Animal Husbandry) Jacksonville 

Florence Evelyn Greenleaf (in Home Economics) Auburn 

Archelaus Lewis Hamblen (in Horticulture) Gorham 

Marguerite Jones (in Home Economics) Waldoboro 

Lewis Herman Kriger (in Animal Husbandry) Portland 

Fred Perley Loring (in Agronomy) West Pownal 

Donald Josiah Maclntire (in Dairy Husbandry) Biddeford 

Norman Lyle Mathews (in Agronomy) Waterville 

Lester George Morris (in Dairy Husbandry) Bingham 

Guy Casley Palmer (in Animal Husbandry) Patten 

Minnie May Park (in Home Economics) ....Orono 

Myron Columbus Peabody (in Animal Husbandry) Exeter 

Lawrence Eugene Philbrook (in Animal Husbandry) Shelburne, N. H. 

Marian Elizabeth Plummer (in Home Economics) Old Town 

Raymond Eaton Rendall (in Forestry) Melrose, Mass. 

Frederick Robie (in Horticulture) Gorham 

Charles William Ruffner (in Dairy Husbandry) Arcadia, Pa. 



238 



DEGREES CONFERERRED 



Sibyl Lois Russell (in Home Economcs) „ Orono 

Oscar Harold Sanborn (in Animal Husbandry) Weld 

Earle Eaton Shaw (in Forestry) Orono 

James Emmons Totman (in Agronomy) Sidney 

John Lowell Whittier (in Animal Husbandry) Biddeford 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Bachelor of Arts 

Basil Edward Barrett (Economics) Bluehill 

James Edward Barry (Economics) „ Bangor 

Timothy Doten Bonney (Mathematics) Mexico 

Arthur Erwin Butters (Economics) Old Town 

Zella Elizabeth Colvin (Mathematics) Williamsburg, Ind. 

Guy Berwyn Condon (Economics) South Penobscot 

LeRoy Coombs (English) Portland 

Doris Currier ( German ) Bangor 

Fred Holmes Curtis (German) Addison 

Mary Muriel DeBeck (Latin) Franklin 

Carroll Melborne DeWitt (Economics) Brewer 

Charles Edmund Dole (Economics) Bangor 

Michael Columbus Driscoll (French) North Abington, Mass. 

Emery Davis Eddy (Biology) _ Bangor 

Omar Kelsey Edes (Economics) « Dexter 

Winfred Herbert Edminster (Biology) Dixmont 

Ralph William Fannon (Chemistry) Appleton, Wis. 

William Thomas Faulkner (Economics) Greene 

Marie Frederica Foster (Mathematics) Bar Harbor 

Isabel Frances Frawley (French) Bangor 

Philip Burr Grant (Latin) Hampden 

Ernest Linwood Gray (History) South Berwick 

Maynard Fred Jordan (Mathematics) Islesford 

Frances Marie Lougee (German) Winterport 

Harry Richard Lovely (Biology) Gardiner 

Walter Lee Mason (Physics) Monroe 

Earl Stephen Merrill (Biology) ...Orono 

Mildred Cora Morrison (French) Bar Harbor 

Harry Dennis O'Neil (English) Bangor 



239 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Alice Mildred Poore (Latin) Robbinston 

Elmer Deming Potter (English) Topsham 

Clinton Everett Purington (Economics) Portland 

Madeline Frances Robinson (French) Bangor 

Harry Elwood Rollins (Education) Bangor 

Grace Ruth Sawyer (French) Old Town 

Albion Franklin Sherman (Economics) Bar Harbor 

Richard Leslie Silva (Economics) Provincetown, Mass. 

Winfred Eugene Stoddard (Education) Deer Isle 

Dorothy Thompson ( German ) Orono 

Gladys Thompson (German) Orono 

Mary Evelyn Winship (English) Livermore Falls 

Basil Gibson Woods (English) Bangor 

Bachelor of Pedagogy 

Ernest Loren Cookson Albion 

Hoyt Davis Foster Deer Isle 

Herschel Scott Libby - Berry Mills 

COLLEGE OF LAW 

Bachelor of Laws 

Franz Upham Burkett (A. B. Bowdoin, 1911) Union 

Harris Samson Crahmer Bangor 

Earle Erwood Crommett Ridlonville 

Floyd Mason Derrah Portland 

John Raymond Dubee Haverhill Mass. 

George Franklin Eaton Bangor 

John Abraham Garakian (B. A., Robert 1909) Bangor 

Granville Chase Gray Brewer 

Joseph Edmund Harvey Saco 

Donald Campbell Jewett Cherryfield 

Stacy Clifford Lanpher (B. A. Maine, 1908) Foxcroft 

Bernard Joseph McParland Lawrence, Mass. 

Miller Bernard Moren Lowville, N. Y. 

Harry Leland Peterson Danielson, Conn. 

James Patrick Quine Bangor 

Harold LeRoy Reed... Northeast Harbor 



240 



DEGREES CONFERERRED 

William Nathaniel Rogers - Bangor 

Sarah Singleton Bangor 

Charles Sumner Taylor Deer Isle 

Horace Hamblen Towle, Jr Portland 

Thomas Nathan Weeks Winslow 

COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Bachelor of Science 

Harold Dudley Ashton (in Civil Engineering) Springfield, Mass. 

Lewis Orin Barrows (in Pharmacy) Newport 

Robert Whitney Bartlett (in Chemistry) Westfield, Mass. 

Roger Warren Bell (in Civil Engineering) Arlington, Mass. 

Ensor Harding Blanchard (in Civil Engineering) 

Buenos Aires, Argentina, S. A. 

Robert Germain Blanchard (in Civil Engineering) Cumberland Center 

Lewis Henry Blood (in Chemistry) Foxcroft 

Burke Bradbury (in Electrical Engineering) Old Town 

Walter True Brown (in Mechanical Engineering) West Bath 

Forest LeRoy Buckley (in Civil Engineering) Leeds 

Harold Wilhelm Coffin (in Electrical Engineering) Portland 

Erlon Victor Crimmin (in Electrical Engineering) Winterport 

Karl Moody Currier (in Chemical Engineering) Brewer 

John Maynard Dodge (in Mechanical Engineering) Boothbay 

Walter Davis Emerson (in Mechanical Engineering) Orono 

Charles Herbert Folsom (in Civil Engineering) Dexter 

John White Glover (in Mechanical Engineering) Rockland 

Everett Goss Ham (in Chemical Engineering) Foxcroft 

Lawrence Milliken Hunt (in Chemical Engineering) Old Town 

Julius Henry Kritter (in Civil Engineering) Bradford, Mass. 

Charles Kent Lane (in Chemical Engineering) Rockland, Mass. 

Otis Carroll Lawry (in Chemistry) Fairfield 

Benjamin West Lewis (in Electrical Engineering) ..Boothbay Harbor 

Clarence Earl Libby (in Chemical Engineering) Albion 

Thomas Gerald Mangan (in Civil Engineering) Pittsneld, Mass. 

Everett Keith Mansfield (in Chemical Engineering) Fryeburg 

Howard Winfield Mayers (in Civil Engineering) Dresden 

Ralph Lee Moore (in Civil Engineering) Hallowell 



241 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Robert McGregor Moore (in Mechanical Engineering) Biddeford 

Arno Wilbur Nickerson (in Chemical Engineering) Brewer 

William Robert Nugent (in Civil Engineering) Portland 

Francis William O'Rourke (in Chemicfxl Engineering) Saco 

Ansel Alva Packard (in Electrical Engineering) Belfast 

Marlborough Packard (in Civil Engineering) Sebec Lake 

Ferdinand Zanoni Phelps (in Chemistry) Foxboro, Mass. 

William Raymond Rich (in Chemistry) Gorham 

Samuel Rudman (in Civil Engineering) Bangor 

Norman Clifford Small (in Civil Engineering) Farmington 

Allen G Smith (in Mechanical Engineering) Bluehill 

Harry Edward Stone (in Electrical Engineering) Cornish 

Omar Fred Tarr (in Chemical Engineering) Auburn 

Walter Waitstill Webber (in Chemistry) Lewiston 

George Thomas Woodward (in Mechanical Engineering) Lisbon Falls 

GRADUATE IN PHARMACY 

Earle Oliver Blanchet Northampton, Mass. 

Horace El win Grant Waterville 

Frank Irving Hargreaves Sanford 

William James Mackin Millinocket 

Chester Robert Parker Bluehill 

Carroll Russell Staples Norridgewock 

ADVANCED DEGREES 

Master of Arts 

Lucretia Almira Davis (French [B. A., 1915] Old Town 

Raymond Donald Douglass (Mathematics) [B. A., 1915] Gorham 

Carl Bertrand Estabrooke (History) [B. A., 1912] „ Orono 

Caro (Beverage) Faulkner (German) [B. A., Colby, 1907] Greene 

Norman Richards French (Physics) [B. A., 1914] Fort Fairfield 

Ruth Armstrong Grahame (History) [A. B., Park, 1914] Kansas City, Mo. 

Margaret June Kelley (German) [B. A., 1912] Bangor 

Antoinette Treat Webb (English) [B. A., 1912] Bangor 

Roscoe Woods (Mathematics) [B. A., Georgetown College, 1914] 

Vanarsdell, Ky. 



242 



DEGREES CONFERERRED 



Master of Science 

Albert Davis Conley (Chemistry) [B. S., 1911; Ch. E., 1914] Orono 

Orville Alvin Jamison (Biology) [B. Sc, Ohio State, 1912] Amherst, Mass. 

Sidney Winfield Patterson (Biology) [B. S., 1914] Winslow 

Adrian Archibald Achilles St. Marie (Chemistry) [B. S., Minnesota, 1914] 

Crookston, Minn. 
Neil Carpenter Sherwood (Biology) [B. S., 1914] Cherryneld 

Chemical Engineering 

Edward Thomas Aloysius Coughlin [B. S., 1913] Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Arthur Clement Eaton [B. S., 1911] Edgewater, N. J. 

Robert Elliott Hussey [B. S., 1912] Northfield, Vt. 

Raymond Pratt Norton [B. S., 1910] Washington, D. C 

CERTIFICATES 

In Home Economics 

Mary Newton Beckett.... Calais 

Mollie Geneva Burleigh South Biddeford 

Grace Elizabeth Clapp West Somerville, Mass. 

Lucile Greeley Clark Freedom 

Edith Gertrude Clark Peak Island 

Fannie Persis Flint West Baldwin 

Veda Desire Folley Sangerville 

Mildred Iva Jones Unity 

Emma Spring Perry Machias 

Erma Lucile Royal Houlton 

Helen Perley Taylor Peabody, Mass. 

In the School Course in Agriculture 

Harry Stowe Bennett Millbury, Mass. 

John Earl Fowler Portland 

Ellsworth Joseph Hobbs Mattawamkeag 

Leon Elwin Lambert Brewer 

Edwin Clarence Martin Liberty 



243 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Joseph Henry Moore, Jr Winthrop 

George Edward Roberts, Jr Weeks Mills 

Reid Myles Sherman - Island Falls 

Vergne Rockwood Snow Portland 

George Fay Trueworthy Mattawamkeag 

DEGREES OUT OF COURSE 

Bachelor of Laws 

Frank Bernard Clancy Nashua, N. H. 

as of the Class of 1910 

Bachelor of Science 

Edwin Freeman Bearce (in Electrical Engineering) Chillicothe, Ohio 

as of the Class of 1905 

Vaughn Jones (in Mechanical Engineering) Bangor 

as of the Class of 1904 



244 






CATALOG OF STUDENTS 



CATALOG OF STUDENTS 



Major subjects are indicated as follows: Ag. Agronomy, An. Animal 
Industry, Be. Biological Chemistry, Bl. Biology, Ch. Chemistry, Ch. 
Eng. Chemical Engineering, Ce. Civil Engineering, Dh. Dairy Hus- 
bandry, Es. Economics, Ed. Education, Ee. Electrical Engineering, Eh. 
English, Fy. Forestry, Fr. French, Gm. German, Gk. Greek, Hy. History, 
He. Home Economics, Ht. Horticulture, Lt. Latin, Ms. Mathematics, 
Me. Mechanical Engineering, Ph. Poultry Husbandry, Pm. Pharmacy, 
PI. Philosophy, Pp. Plant Pathology, Ps. Physics, Si. Spanish and Italian. 



GRADUATE STUDENTS 




Adams, James Abraham, B. A., Ps. 


Orono 


43 Mill Street 


Maine, 1915 






Allen, Lloyd Carroll, A. B., Ch. 


Auburn 


105 Oak Hall 


Bates, 1914 






Atwater, Donald Vince, B. S., Bl. 


Orono 


7 Pleasant Street 


Maine, 1916 






Bain, Herbert Soley, A. B., Gm. 


Orono 


53 Main Street 


Wesleyan, 1912 






Axtell, Paul Henry, A. B., Eh. 


Orono 


13 Pine Street 


Colgate, 1916 






Bartlett, Emily Mary, B. A., Bl. 


Orono 


148 College Street 


Maine, 1912 






Brown, Harry Chamberlain, B. S., 


Orono 


61 Bennoch Street 


Ps. Brown, 1913 






Buncke, Harry Jacob, C E., Ch. 


Whitestone, 


New York, N. Y 


Columbia, 1915 






Butters, Arthur Erwin, B. A., Ed. 


Old Town 




Maine, 1916 






Chadbourne, Ava Harriet, B. A., Ed. 


Orono 


32 College Street 


Maine, 1915 







245 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Carleton, Edward Frazier, B. A., Fr. 

Maine, 1912 
Chase, Martha Durgin, B. A., Fr. 

Boston University, 1906 
Clarke, George Clarence, B. A., Ms. 

Maine, 1913 
Colvin, Zella Elizabeth, B. A., Ms. 

Maine, 1916 
Fairchild, Thomas Everett, B. S., 

Bl. Maine, 1916 
Floyd, Raymond, B. A., Gm. 

Maine, 1913 
Fuller, William David, Ph. B., Ed. 

Wisconsin, 1910 
Gilday, Walter Henry, A. B., Ed. 

Harvard, 1914 
Goldsmith, Chester Hamlin, B. S., 

Ch. Maine, 1915 
Hamlin, James Archie, A. B., Ed. 

Bowdoin, 1914 
Hutchinson, Robert Orland, A. B., 

Ps. Indiana, 1914 
Jack, George Edwin, A. B., Ch. 

Bates, 1910 
Lanpher, Stacy Clifford, B. A., 

LL.B., Law. Maine, 1908, 1915 
Malone, Hannah Frances, A. B., Ed. 

Bates, 1914 
Metcalf, Clell Lee, B. A., M. A., Bl. 

Ohio State, 1911, 1912 
Pettey, Willis Thurston, B. S., Bl. 

Maine, 1915 
Phinney, Chester Squire, B. A., Gm. 

Maine, 1911 
Rao, Ramanathapur Sitarama, B. Sc, 

Ch. University of Bombay, 

1913 
Raven, Anton Adolph, Jr. A. B., Eh. 

Rutgers, 1916 
Rich, William Robert, B. S., Ch. 

Maine, 1916 



Parsons field 

Portland 

Kent's Hill 

Williamsburg, Ind. 

32 College Street 
Livermore Falls $K2 House 

Orono University Inn 

Old Town Old Town 

Old Town Old Town 

Orono 32 College Street 

Old Town Old Town 

Orono 61 Bennoch Street 

Bowdoinham 

Foxcroft 

61 Fourth Street, Bangor 
Ellsworth Orono 

Columbus, O. 

North Dartmouth, Mass. 

Pawtucket, R. I. 

Bangalore, India Stillwater 

Orono University Inn 

Gorham ATA House 



246 



CATALOG OF STUDENTS 



Roberts, John Leonard, A. B., Ms. 

Bowdoin, 1911 
Sink, Stanley Ben, B. Sc, Be. 

Ohio State, 1915 
Smith, Harry Woodbury, B. S., Bl. 

Maine, 1909 
Smith, Oscar Samuel, B. A., Hy. 

Maine, 1913 
Stinson, Parker Burroughs, A. B., 

Ed. Bates, 1915 
St. Onge, Arthur Amos, B. A., Ed. 

Maine, 1914 
Swasey, Guy Henry, A. B., Ed. 

Bates, 1914 
Tarbox, James Obadiah, A. B., Ch. 

Bowdoin, 1914 
Thomas, J Fred, B. S., Bl. 

Iowa State, 1915 
Whitmore, Albert Ames, B. S., Hy. 

Maine, 1906 
Wilbur, Oscar Milton, B. S., Bl. 

Maine, 1915 
Woods, Roscoe, B. A., M. A., Ms. 

Georgetown, Maine, 1914 t 1916 



Orono 124 Main Street 

Orono Forest Avenue 

Orono 384 College Street 

Bangor 160 Essex Street, Bangor 

Wiscasset 

Foxcroft 

Lincoln 

Newcastle 

Orono Forest Avenue 

Orono Orono 

Orono Campus 

Orono 29 Main Street 



SENIORS 



Aikens, Frederick Harlow, Dh. 
Ames, Ivan Cecil, Ce. 
Andrews, Harold Pierce, Fy. 
Bayley, Charles William, Dh. 
Beckler, Warren Bigelow, Ch. Eng. 
Berger, Samuel Solomon, Ch. Eng. 
Bernstein, Louis Abraham, Ce. 
Berry, Leroy Nahum, An. 
Blanchard, Arthur Nile, Dh. 
Brackett, Altie Franklin, Ee~ 
Brasseur, Ralph Baldwin, Ce. 
Brawn, Earl Robertson, Ee. 



South Windham 112 H. H. Hall 

North Haven BOH House 

Monmouth 210 H. H. Hall 

Wells 409 H. H. Hall 

Auburn 301 Oak Hall 

Lawrence, Mass. <£ E n House 

Auburn <f> E n House 

South Bridgton 112 H. H. Hall 
Cumberland Center A X A House 

Berwick A T Q House 

Bradford, Mass. * K 2 House 

South Portland 2 N House 



247 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Brawn, Worthen Earle, Ch. Eng. 
Bright, Elizabeth Mason, Bl. 
Bristol, Grace Bidwell, He. 

Brown, Brooks, Dh. 

Brown, Ruth Ellen, Eh. 

Burke, John Andrew Aloysius, Me. 

Callahan, Raymond Murray, An. 

Carter, Ray Milo, Ch. 

Chadbourne, Paul Everett, Me. 
Chaplin, Leola Bowie, Eh. 
Clapp, Elwood Irvin, Ch. Eng. 
Cobb, Sumner Chase, Ms. 
Collins, Parkman Abbott, Bl. 
Coombs, Jessie Willett, Ped. 
Copp, Lincoln Brackett, Es. 
Creeden, James Coharn, Ce. 
Crossland, Charles Edward, An. 
Crowell, Fred Donald, Es. 
Currier, Harold Newcomb, Ch. Eng. 
Dempsey, Edmund James, Ch. 
Dodge, Richard Boulsby, Ph. 
Dole, George Elmer, Es. 
Ellis, Alfreda, He. 
Emery, Charles Irving, Ms. 
Emery, Earle Leslie, An. 
Emery, Marion, He. 
Falvey, John Michael, Fr. 
Farnham, Walter Elwood, Me. 
Fickett, Ernest Leslie, Me. 
Fides, Avery Meader, An. 
Fletcher, Robert Kemble, Bl. 
Fraser, Ralph Ervin, Me. 
Freese, Langdon Jackson, Ms. 
French, Frank Alexander, Es. 
Gonyer, Frances Louise, Fr. 
Gorham, William Joseph, Es. 
Grant, Benjamin Elwell, Es. 
Greene, Daniel Emerson, An. 



Bath 206 H. H. Hall 

Bangor Mt. Vernon House 

West Hartford, Conn. 

Mt. Vernon House 
Dover ATA House 

Brewer Brewer 

Portland A T ft House 

Sabattus 9 X House 

West Hawley, Mass. 

310 H. H. Hall 
Biddeford 3> K 2 House 

Cornish Balentine Hall 

Brewer Brewer 

Woodfords $ K 2 House 

Readfield Depot 9 X House 

Waldoboro Balentine Hall 

Cornish 2 N House 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 9 X House 

Lawrence, Mass. 205 H. H. Hall 
Bangor B 9 n House 

Brewer $ K 2 House 

Orono 2 X House 

Machias 211 Oak Hall 

Haverhill, Mass. 9 X House 

Belfast Mt. Vernon House 

Salisbury Cove 2 N House 

Salisbury Cove 2 N House 

Limerick Mt. Vernon House 

Orono A T ft House 

Orono 54 Forest Avenue 

Portland 9 X House 

Orfs Island 3> H K House 

Orono 38 North Main Street 

Presque Isle $ H K House 

Bangor K 2 House 

Orono 9 X House 

Orono Oak Street 

Portland K 2 House 

Cumberland Mills 2 X House 
Brewer 112 H. H. Hall 



248 



CATALOG OF STUDENTS 



Greenwood, Russell Sanford, An. 
Gribbin, Benjamin Herbert, Es. 
Guiou, Elty Chester, Ce. 
Hamilton, Guy Bradford, Dh. 
Hanly, Edward Kavanaugh, Fy. 
Hansen, George Edward, Fy. 
Harrison, Mary Violetta, Gm. 
Haskell, Weston Bradford, Dh. 
Herrick, Carleton Sewall, Es. 
Higgins, Dorrice Mae, Fr. 
Higgins, Royal Grant, Jr., Ms. 
Hill, Mark Langdon, Ch. 
Hiller, Howard Bryant, Dh. 
Hopkins, Bryant Lealand, Ce. 
Howard, Flora Adelaide, He. 

Hugh, Yee Tin, PL 

LL. B., Valparaiso, 1915 
Hunt, Lilian Crosby, Eh. 
Hurd, Everett St. Claire, Ee. 
Hutchinson, Daniel Clair, Ag. 
Ingraham, Edith Louise, Gm. 
Jacobs, Maurice, Bl. 
Jenkins, Howard Lawrence, An. 
Johnson, Carl Strong, Dh. 
Jones, Frederic Paul, Ee. 
Kilburn, George Washington, Ms. 
King, Harold Lewis, Ch. 
Kloss, Theodore Edward, Ch. Eng. 
Lane, Hazel Irene, He. 
Legal, Chapin, Ht. 
Libby, Philip Nason, Fy. 
Locke, John Fernando, Ch. 
Maddocks, Carlton Whaton, Ped. 
Mank, Nelson Fountain, Me. 
Marble, Gerald Coker, Me. 
March, Ruth Evelyn, He. 
Mathews, Wilbur Leonard, Ee. 
Mercier, Dorothy, Lt. 
Merrill, Katharine Buffum, Eh, 



Presque Isle 

Portland 

Presque Isle 

Portland 

Thomaston 33 

Worcester, Mass. 

Freeport 

Auburn 

South Brewer 

Brewer Mt. 

Bar Harbor 

Bath 

Marion, Mass. 

North Haven 

Bangor 

82 Montgomery 
Canton, China 



41 Mill Street 

$ H K House 

Grove Street 

A X A House 

Bennoch Street 

412 H. H. Hall 

Balentine Hall 

Ben House 

K 2 House 

Vernon House 

2 N House 

BOn House 

2 A E House 

$TA House 

Street, Bangor 
101 Oak Hall 



Old Town Old Town 

Pittsfield 3> K 2 House 

Dover 56 Park Street 

Bangor 78 Grant Street, Bangor 
Methuen, Mass. $ E n House 

Methuen, Mass. $ E n House 

Easthampton, Mass. Ben House 
Biddeford 301 H. H. Hall 

Fort Fairfield 2 X House 



Orono 


Pleasant Street 


Kennebunkport 


$ r A House 


Lewiston 


Balentine Hall 


Calais 


2 N House 


Gray 


2 A E House 


Augusta 


2 A E House 


Nicolin 


Park Street 


Portland 


2 N House 


Skowhegan 


K 2 House 


Easton 


Balentine Hall 


Berwick 


A T fi House 


Princeton 


Balentine Hall 


Orono 


178 Main Street 



249 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Moloney, Helen Carew, Eh. 
Moody, Charles Leo, Ht. 
Moulton, Joseph Wendell, Ce. 
Moulton, Parker Nash, Bl. 
Mower, Clyde Fletcher, Me. 
Mower, Leland Monroe, Ce. 
Mullen, Charles Emerson, Ch. Eng. 
Mulloney, Lawrence Edmund, Me. 
Murphy, Blanche Lauretta, Ped. 
Murray, Mable Thurston, Ped. 
McAlister, Royce Delano, Ed. 
McCabe, Francis Thomas, Ee. 
McCabe, George Curtin, Ee. 
McCobb, Herbert Hodges, Ag. 
McCusker, Joseph Aloysius, Bl. 
Nash, William Edmund, Ce. 
Newton, Maxwell, Ch. Eng. 
Nowell, Foster, Ce. 
Noyes, Garth Albert, Ee. 
O'Donoghue, William Florance, Fy. 
Page, Schuyler Colfax, Jr., Ee. 
Partridge, Clara Estelle, He. 
Pemberton, Harold Sawyer, Ce. 
Pendleton, Raymond Ambrose, Ms. 
Penney, Charles Clifton, An. 
Perkins, Edward Adolphus, Ee. 

Perry, John Howard, Ch. 
Perry, Mildred Geneva, Fr. 
Peterson, Henry Andrew, Bl. 
Phelps, Elizabeth Cornelia, Gm. 
Phillips, Stanley Gilkey, Ce. 
Pierce, Ralph Bartlett, Ch. 
Pierson, Howard Lester, Ch. 
Pitman, Linwood True, Eh. 
Post, Lawrence Leicester, Ce. 
Preble, Leslie Edward, Ch. Eng. 
Prentice, William Henry, Me. 
Prescott, Glenn Carleton, Es. 



Orono 56 North Main Street 

North Monmouth Campus 

Rutland, Mass. 304 H. H. Hall 

Bath 2 A E House 

Dexter 15 Park Street 

Auburn 202 Oak Hall 
Bangor 39 West Broadway, Bangor 

Portland A T ft House 

Portland Balentine Hall 

Boothbay Harbor Balentine Hall 

Bucksport 2» A E House 

Worcester, Mass. ATA House 

Kennebunkport 9 X House 

Lincolnville Campus 

Orono 9 X House 

Concord, N. H. K 2 House 

Kent's Hill $ E H House 

Reading, Mass. ATA House 

Orono Forest Avenue 

Orono A X A House 

Caribou $> H K House 

Pemaquid Beach Balentine Hall 

Groveland, Mass. A X A House 

Brewer Campus 

Lewiston 9 X House 
Old Orchard 

391 Union Street, Bangor 

Lincoln ATA House 

Orono R. F. D. 7, Bangor 

Portland 2 N House 

Foxboro, Mass. Balentine Hall 

Westbrook $TA House 

Beverly, Mass. 2 X House 

Detroit Park Street 

Augusta 9 X House 

Alfred 31 Mill Street 

Saco 7 Pleasant Street 

Round Pond 302 Oak Hall 

Kezar Falls 3> H K House 



250 



CATALOG OF STUDENTS 



Remick, Edward Carleton, Ps. 
Reynolds, William Eugene, Dh. 
Rice, Charles Anthony, Es. 
Ricker, Ruth Merrill, He. 
Robinson, Carl Elmo, Dh. 
Robinson, George Campbell, Me. 
Robinson, Veysey Hiram, Ped. 
Rowley, Levi Thaddeus, Me. 
Savage, Doris, Gm. 
Sawyer, Charles Augustine, Me. 
Sawyer, Ralph Erie, Ee. 
Scribner, Jotfn Leslie, Ag. 

Sherman, Fuller Gustavus, Ch. 
Sidelinger, Claude Lyndon, Ped. 
Simpson, William Andrew, Ht. 
Smith, Clarence Llewellyn, Me. 
Smith, Marshall Odell, Ch. Eng. 
Stackpole, Miner Reginald, Ce. 
Stephens, Frank Owen, Eh. 
Stephenson, Charles Lindsley, Ag. 
Steward, Raymond Benson, Dh. 
Stoddard, Stanley Waldron, Ee. 
Stoehr, Rudolph, Dh. 
Stoughton, Richard, Ht. 
Sturtevant, Jessie May, Eh. 
Thomas, Roy Frank, Dh. 
Travers, Robert James, Ee. 
Treworgy, Forrest Reuben, Ps. 
Wadlin, George Knowlton, Ee. 
Wahlenberg, William Gustavus, Fy. 
Wardwell, Simon Murray, Ch. 
Waterhouse, Russell Vale, An. 
Watkins, Herbert Everett, Ch. 
Waugh, Harvey Cyrus, Me. 
Welch, Donald Stuart, Bl. 
Wilbur, Elwood Morton, Ce. 
Wood, Frances Andrews, Fr. 
Wood, Lawrence Blanchard, An. 
Wood, Margaret Allen, Gm. 



Springvale K 2 House 

Northeast Harbor A t A House 
Portland K 2 House 

Lisbon Mt. Vernon House 

Bangor 408 H. H. Hall 

Westbrook A t A House 

Bristol Old Town 

Hartford, Conn. A T House 
Bangor 35 Maple Street, Bangor 
Portland X House 

Buxton 2 N House 

Plattsburg, N. Y. 

33 Bennoch Street 
Randolph ATA House 

Washington 3 Middle Street 

Marlboro, Mass. 2 N House 

Vinalhaven 207 H. H. Hall 

Y armouthville G X House 

Sanford 2 A E House 

Auburn B n House 

Orono <£ H K House 

Portland 304 Oak Hall 

Bingham A T fi House 

Sabattus Park Street 

Montague, Mass. A X A House 
Milo 11 Main Street 

Monson 8 Main Street 

Bangor 68 Jefferson Street, Bangor 
Ellsworth 2 N House 

East Northport A X A House 

Thompsonville, Conn. A X A House 
Auburn B 9 n House 

Kennebunk 2 A E House 

Woodfords ATA House 

Levant 2 N House 

Norway $ H K House 

Sorrento 3 Middle Street 

Bar Harbor Balentine Hall 

Kingfield 410 H. H. Hall 

Bar Harbor Balentine Hall 



251 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Registered after publication of 1915-16 Catalog 



Woodward, George Thomas, Me. Lisbon Falls 

JUNIORS 



3> H K House 



Abbott, Voyle Eben, Es. 
Adams, George Joseph, Ps. 
Aikins, Walter Bowen, Dh. 
Allen, William Henry, Es. 
Amos, Luther Newell, Ee. 
Annis, Howard LeRoy, Fy. 
Atherton, Raymon Neale, Ag. 
Bailey, George Raymond, Me. 
Barnard, Adriel Fales, Me. 
Barrett, Willett Clark, Gm. 
Benson, Clyde Allen, Ch. Eng. 
Beverage, Stanley Fremont, Ch. 
Bisbee, Frederick Carleton, Ee. 

Blackman, Marie Prince, He. 
Blaisdell, Harvard Wilbur, Es. 
Blanchard, Marjorie Madeline, Ped. 
Boothby, Wallace Johnson, Es. 
Brackett, Robert Emerson, Ps. 
Bransfield, William Henry, Ee. 
Brasier, Everett Hovey, Dh. 
Brittain, Thomas Waldo, Ch. 
Brooks, Samuel Stevens, Ed. 
Brown, Clifford, Ce. 
Bubier, Sylvester Breed, Es. 
Caine, Mae Frances, Fr. 
Caldwell, Harold Benjamin, Ce. 
Calhoun, Lewis Tracy, Fy. 
Cameron, George Clifton, Me. 
Cannon, Gertrude Frances, Gm. 
Carlson, Thurston Daniel, Ee. 
Carlton, George Melvin, Ee. 
Carter, George Milton, Ee. 
Chadbourne, Preston Berlin, Dh. 



Albion A T Q House 

Orono 41 Mill Street 

South Windham 111 H. H. Hall 
Brownville Junction B 9 n House 
Houlton Grove Street 

Lincoln Center A T Q House 
Augusta 407 H. H. Hall 

Northampton, Mass. A T fi House 
Buck sport 308 Oak Hall 

Newport, R. I. * r A House 

Lewision 6 X House 

North Haven S A E House 

Berlin, N. H. 

R. F. D. #7, Bangor 
Peak Island Mt. Vernon House 
North Sullivan Main Street 

Springvale Balentine Hall 

Bangor 312 H. H. Hall 

Liming ton 39 Mill Street 

Willimantic, Conn. 3 Middle Street 
Guilford $ r A House 

Island Falls 2 A E House 

Orono 3 Middle Street 

Portland $ T A House 

Amesbury, Mass. 180 Main Street 
Brewer Brewer 

Madison 2 X House 

Bridgeport, Conn. K 2 House 
Fryeburg 2 A E House 

Brewer Brewer 

Hopedale, Mass. 2 A E House 
Woolwich 301 H. H. Hall 

Washburn 301 H. H. Hall 

Harmony 109 H. H. Hall 



252 



CATALOG OF STUDENTS 



Chalmers, Ruth Bartlett, Fr. 
Chapin, Francis Deering, Me. 
Chapman, Russell Comstock, Es. 
Cheney, George Henry, Ch. Eng. 
Cole, Raymond Fuller, Es. 
Coolbroth, Earnest Leon, Ce 
Cram, Beryl Eliza, Eh. 
Cram, Ernest Victor, Ce. 
Crawshaw, Thomas Hill, Fy. 
Creamer, Walter Joseph, Jr., Ee. 
Crockett, Mark Vernon, Ed. 
Crosby, Ruth, He. 
Cushing, Benjamin Hilton, Fy. 
Dahlgren, Sigfried Alexander, Dh. 
Davis, Manley Webster, Ch. Eng. 
Davis, Melvin Linwood, Ee. 
DeBeck, Edith Eirena, Ms. 
Dennett, Winburn Albert, Ht. 
Derby, Pauline, Gm. 
Dollofr, Philip Warren, Ht. 
Dow, Kathryn, He. 
Drisko, Clarence Holmes, Me. 
Dugan, Frances Joan, Gm. 
Dunham, Stephen Merle, Me. 
Edgerly, Lloyd Irving, Ch. Eng. 
Ellsworth, Harry Arthur, Dh. 
Emerson, Raymond LaForest, Fy. 
Emmons, Everett Ellsworth, Ee. 
Evans, Weston Sumner, Ce. 
Farrar, Helen Wilcox, Eh. 
Ferguson, Frank Currier, Eh. 
Fernald, Abraham Chadwick, Jr. 
Folsom, Dorothy Louise, Gm. 
Frawle\, Marie Alice, Si. 
French, Gardner Marble, Es. 
Frost, Ermont Getchell, Es. 
Gammelgaard, Lewis Waldo, Ch. Eng 
Gardner, Leigh Philbrook, Ag. 
Gellerson, Vera Elvira, Eh. 
Gibbs, Frederick Donald, Ee. 



Bangor Mt. Vernon House 

Saco A X A House 

Hartford, Conn. * K 2 House 

Randolph $TA House 

Brewer ATA House 

Woodfords * r A House 

New Sharon Balentine Hall 

Sanford 3> T A House 

Lewiston 2 N House 

Bangor 24 George Street, Bangor 
Gorham, N. H. X House 

Bangor 32 College Street 

Portland 2 X House 

Camden A T fi House 

Guilford $TA House 

Sabattus 311 H. H. Hall 

Franklin Balentine Hall 

Hopedale, Mass. 2 A E House 

Bangor 366 French Street, Bangor 
Standish 312 H. H. Hall 

Searsport Mt. Vernon House 

Columbia Falls 25 Grove Street 
Bangor 54 Sidney Street, Bangor 
Lewiston G X House 

Swamp scott, Mass. K 2 House 

Farmington 211 H. H. Hall 

Island Falls 25 Grove Street 

Portland 207 H. H. Hall 

South Windham A X A House 

East Corinth Balentine Hall 

New York, N. Y. K 2 House 
Mt. Desert ATA House 

Norridgewock Balentine Hall 

Bangor Balentine Hall 

Mansfield, Mass. 309 H. H. Hall 
Springvale K 2 House 

Attleboro, Mass. 212 H. H. Hall 
Dennysville 401 H. H. Hall 

Houlton Mt. Vernon House 

South Portland 2 N House 



253 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Gibbs, Grace Mabel, Bl. 
Gross, Maurice Clinton, Ed. 
Hagerty, Jean Mason, Es. 
Haines, Frederick Bates, Ce. 
Hall, Sumner Augustus, Dh. 
Ham, Wallace Reed, Ee. 
Harmon, Frank Lorenzo, Ee. 
Harper, William Chesley, Ee. 

Hawthorne, Robert Henry, Ce. 
Head, Francis, Ce. 
Hill, Roger Benson, Ch. 
Hogan, Louis William, Ee. 
Hooper, Henry Stimson, Ch. 
Hurd, Robert Gerry, Ch. 
Hutchins, George Stanley, Me. 
Jones, Harold Norton, Ee. 
Jortberg, Charles Augustus, Ch. Eng. 
Joy, Armand Elwood, Ed. 
Katz, Simon, Ch. Eng. 
Keep, John Marcus, Si. 

Kellogg, Thelma Louise, Eh. 
Kennett, Russell Blaisdell, Me. 
Kimball, Lester Willis, Es. 
Larrabee, Callie Hamm, Bl. 
Lawrence, Fila Lavina, He. 
Leighton, Mildred Estelle, He. 
Leighton, Ralph Melvin, Ch. 
Lewis, Roscoe Samuel, Hy. 
Libby, Donald Maxwell, Ee. 
Libby, Frank Dexter, Ch. Eng. 
Libby, Lucien Taylor, Ch. Eng. 
Lottinville, Marie Anne Leonie, Fr. 
Lovejoy, Raymond Harwood, Ht. 
Lown, Philip William, Ch. Eng. 
Magee, John Henry, Eh. 
Mason, Alice Eliza, Lt. 
Matheson, Beatrice Louise, He. 
May. Edwin Hyland, Ee. 



East Orland Balentine Hall 

Deer Isle 2 A E House 

Bangor 201 H. H. Hall 

Portland Ben House 

Portland ATA House 

Bath 206 H. H. Hall 

Corinna $ H K House 

Gardiner 

246 Main Street, Old Town 
Brownville 25 Grove Street 

Bangor B n House 

Peabody, Mass. 2 N House 

Houlton Grove Street 

Orono 38 Pine Street 

Bangor $ H K House 

Cape Neddick 2 X House 

Peabody, Mass. 2 N House 

Portland A T ft House 

West Sullivan 2 A E House 

Portsmouth, N. H $EII House 
North Conway, N. H. 

A X A House 
Vanceboro Balentine Hall 

Madison, N. H. 2 X House 

Cliftondale, Mass. 180 Main Street 
Frankfort 40 Main Street 

North Lubec Mt. Vernon House 
Orono College Street 

Bar Harbor College Street 

Auburn 2 N House 

Limerick 7 Park Street 

Gardiner ATA House 

Scarboro 10 Park Street 

Brockton, Mass. Balentine Hall 
New Sharon 25 Grove Street 

Bangor $ E n House 

Bangor K 2 House 

Mount Desert 32 College Street 
Bangor 306 Essex Street, Bangor 
Hartford, Conn. & K 2 House 



254 



CATALOG OF STUDENTS 



May, Marie Etta, An. 
Merrill, Charles Neal, Ch. Eng. 
Merrill, Marguerite Frances, He. 
Merriman, Lawrence Tilton, Ag. 
Merritt, Raymond Lowell, Ht. 
Mooers, Susie Dyer, He. 
Morse, James Lester, An. 
Moulton, Albert Bigelow, Ee. 
Moulton, Simon Waldo, Es. 
Mullen, Joseph Norman, Ee. 
Murphy, William Robert, Dh. 
McGrath, Joseph William, Ch. 
Macllroy, Cecil Dow, Es. 
McKown, Richard Edward, Es. 
McLean, Edward Archibald, Ce. 
McNamara, Raymond Leo, Ms. 
McPhee, Hugh Curtis, Ag. 
McWilliams, Mona Beatrice, Gm. 
Newell, George Clifford, Ce. 
Newman, Isaiah Leavitt, Me. 
Niles, Walter Leslie, Es. 
Norton, Donald William, Ch. 
Norton, George Chapman, Ht. 
O'Brion, Arthur Bartholomew, Pm. 
Oliver, George Taylor, Jr., Ht. 
Osgood, Arthur Bradley, Ee. 
Park, Irwin James, Ce. 
Parmenter, Robert Brown, Fy. 
Paul, George Boss, Ch. 

Penley, Ferdinand Josiah, An. 
Perkins, Carl Wakefield, Ch. 
Perkins, Carleton Lincoln, Fy. 
Perkins, Myles Standish, Me. 
Perry, Donald Burke, Ee. 
Pinkham, Jessie Marie, He. 
Ramsay, John Parker, Es. 
Ramsdell, Hollis Leroy, Dh. 
Reed, Carrol Coffin, An. 
Reed, Gladys Gage, Gm. 



Island Falls Park Street 

Bangor <£ V A House 

Mechanic Falls Balentine Hall 

Harpswell Center A X A House 

Brooks * H K House 

New Sharon Balentine Hall 

Bath <£> T A House 

Worcester, Mass. 304 H. H. Hall 

Sebago Lake B 9 n House 

Bangor $ r A House 

Old Town Old Town 
Northhampton, Mass. A T House 

Milo 9 X House 

Southport 2 X House 

Augusta 406 H. H. Hall 

Orono Mill Street 

South Paris 209 H. H. Hall 
Bangor Mt. Vernon House 

Turner 303 H. H. Hall 

East Wilton 411 H. H. Hall 

Hallowell ATA House 

Kingfield * K 2 House 

Strong Grove Street 

Portland A X A House 

Kennebunk K 2 House 

Bradford Stillwater 

Orono Main Street 

Lincolnville 2 X House 
York Beach 

372 Hammond Street, Bangor 

Auburn 2 A E House 

Ogunquit 201 H. H. Hall 
Newbury port, Mass. 88 Main Street 

Worcester, Mass. 406 H. H. Hall 

Hallowell $ H K House 

Farmington Balentine Hall 

Woodfords $ K 2 House 

West Lubec Campus 

Hollis, N. H. College Street 
Bangor 38 Elm Street, Bangor 



255 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Rich, Robert, Es. 
Ring, Edgar Raymond, Es. 
Ross, Charlotte Fern, He. 
Rowe, Harland Stimson, Es. 
Ruggles, Gould Bishop, Ee. 
Russell, Alfred Mason, Me. 
Russell, Doris Ethel, Bl. 
Shaw, Albert Leland, Ch. Eng. 
Shaw, Reba Cleaves, He. 
Shea, Thomas Francis, Ce. 

Simms, Henry Swain, Ch. 
Sisson, Willard Case, Dh. 
Small, Clive Ceylon, Ch. 
Smiley, James Harold, Ce. 
Somers, Roy Merry, Dh. 
Spaulding, Herbert Ansel, Ht. 
Speirs, James Everett, Ch. 
Spratt, Aubury Johnson, Me. 
Springer, Clarence Barrows, Ee. 
Stanley, Watson Frank, Es. 
Storer, Clayton Alton, Dh. 
Stott, Gerald Ross, Ch. Eng. 
Stuart, Helen Loggie, Gm. 
Sturtevant, Walter Conrad, Dh. 
Swift, Harold Clayton, Dh. 
Thaanum, Joanna Mary, He. 
Theriault, Dolore Frank, Me. 
Thomas, Marion Louise, He. 
Thompson, Seward Roy, Es. 
Townsend, Harvard Clark, An. 
Turner, Dwight Wilson, Dh. 
Turner, Ernest Julian, Ch. 
Utecht, Mary Ellen, Eh. 
Vrooman, Lee, Ht. 
Watson, Harry Dexter, Me. 
Waugh, Evelyn Marguerite, Ped. 
Webster, Fred Lot, Dh. 
Wells, Richard Rundlette, Es. 
Wentworth, Ralph Carlton, An. 



Berlin, N.H. K2 House 

Orono Summer Street 

Dexter Balentine Hall 

Springvale B 9 n House 

Reading, Mass. A X A House 

Rangeley 310 H. H. Hall 

Orono 124 Main Street 

Lewiston $ T A House 

Orono 56 Park Street 
Bangor 

154 Parkview Avenue, Bangor 

Gorham $ T A House 

Hartford, Conn. 410 H. H. Hall 

Farmington $K2 House 

Bradford, Mass. $ K 2 House 

Portland ATA House 

Buckfield 201 Oak Hall 

Portland ATA House 

Bar Harbor 2 X House 

Portland 2 N House 

Springvale B 9 II House 

Weld R. F. D. 7, Bangor 

Sangerville 303 H. H. Hall 

Bangor Balentine Hall 

Milo 11 Main Street 

Auburn 2 X House 

■Winthrop Balentine Hall 

Millinocket 203 H. H. Hall 

Newburyport, Mass. Balentine Hall 

Standish 209 H. H. Hall 

Newport 308 H. H. Hall 

Buckfield 201 Oak Hall 

Brewer 74 State Street, Brewer 

Topsham Stillwater 

Greenville 304 Oak Hall 

West Baldwin $ H K House 

Winthrop Balentine Hall 

Farmington Campus 

South Bristol * H K House 

Denmark 2 N House 



256 



CATALOG OF STUDENTS 



Wescott, Merle William, Dh. Rumford 2 A E House 

White, Harry Lincoln, Fr. Belfast K 2 House 

Wunderlich, Albert Whittier, Es. Arlington, Mass. 2 X House 

SOPHOMORES 



Adams, Chester Norris, Ee. 
Adams, Earle Russell, Es. 
Altman, Frank Isadore, Ms. 
Alward, Harry Allen, Ce. 

Ames, Helen Frances, Si. 
Anderson, Carl Alfred, Fy. 

Arnold, Eugene Fairfield, Es. 
Astle, Ray Milton, Ch. Eng. 
Averill, Robert Wallace, Ee. 
Avery, George Halburton, Ag. 
Baldwin, Frederick Earl, Ee. 
Barbour, Forrest Atkinson, Ch. Eng. 
Beaulieu, Jennie Christina, Fr. 
Black, Ethel Corinne, Si. 
Blanchard, Daniel Briggs, Ag. 
Blethen, Melvin Snow, Ee. 
Boyd, Earl George, Me. 
Bradley, Earl Albert, Ed. 
Bragdon, Stacy Lloyd, Ch. 
Brown, Fred Hopkins, Ce. 
Brown, Ralph Lawrence, Bl. 
Burnham, Philip Merle, Ce. 
Campbell, Charles Francis, Ce. 
Caswell, Curtis Lowe, Ch. Eng. 
Champion, Charles Henry, Ch. Eng. 
Chellis, Robert Dunning, Ee. 
Cheney, Joyce Marguerite, Eh. 

Chute, James Lemuel, Ee. 
Clark, Charles Bartlett, Ee. 
Clarke, Ruth Gertrude, Gm. 
Coady, Donald Lewis, Ag. 



Wilton * H K House 

Waterville $TA House 

Lawrence, Mass. 208 H. H. Hall 
Bangor 

65 Fifteenth Street, Bangor 
Vinalhavcn Balentine Hall 

East Bridgewater, Mass. 

104 H. H. Hall 



Foxcroft 

Houlton 

Stillwater 

Stockton Springs 

Peabody, Mass. 

Woodfords 

Old Town 

Vinalhaven 

Auburn 

Foxcroft 

Kingman 

Foxcroft 

Gorham 



27 Park Street 

103 Oak Hall 

Stillwater 

202 Oak Hall 

2 N House 

2 A E House 

Old Town 

Balentine Hall 

311 H. H. Hall 

27 Park Street 

ATA House 

2 A E House 

101 H. H. Hall 



Bangor 52 Fifth Street, Bangor 
Cedar Grove 55 Park Street 

Portland 2 N House 

Ellsworth ATA House 

Hiram 7 Pleasant Street 

Adams, Mass. ATA House 

Portland 2 X House 

Bridgeport, Conn. 

Mt. Vernon House 
Saco A T ft House 

North New Portland $ H K House 
Machias Balentine Hall 

Patten K 2 House 



257 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Cobb, William Bangs, Ag. 
Colbath, Kenneth Brenton, Es. 
Collins, Samuel Wilson, Ag. 
Cook, Raymond John, Es. 
Cooper, Lawrence Arthur, Ch. Eng. 
Corey, Charles Truman, Gm. 
Corn forth, Robert Gardner, Me. 
Cosgrove, William Augustine, Ce. 
Craig, Ira Caswell, Ee. 
Crocker, Percival Bradford, Me. 
Cross, Hugo Silas, Es. 
Cross, Kendall, Me. 
Curran, Anne Genevieve, Eh. 
Danforth, Earl Herrick, Ag. 
Darrah, John Clarke Flagg, Ch. Eng. 
Davis, Jasper Alden Worcester, Ce. 
Davis, Thomas, Ag. 
Day, Frank Conant, Ag. 
DeCoster, Harry Perry, Fy. 
Demerritt, Dwight Burgess, Ch. Eng. 
Denison, Clifford Dawes, Ag. 
Dennis, Eleanor Bessie, Gm. 
Dole, Howard Noyes, Ch. Eng. 
Dolloff, Ray Winfield, Ag. 
Donovan, Frank Edward, Ed. 
Donovan, Irving Raymond, Es. 
Dow, Arthur Greenleaf, Ee. 
Dow, Maynard Weston, Ag. 
Duncan, Cony Alexander, Ch. Eng. 
Eastman, Doris Burkett, He. 
Edwards, Mary Louise, Gm. 

Ellsworth, William Clarence, Ee. 
Emerson, Ralph Waldo, Fy. 
Emery, Newell Wyman, Ms. 
Farnum, Philip Talbot, Ee. 
Farr, Kenneth Randall, Ch. Eng. 
Faulkner, George Armand, Fy. 
Ferren, Earle Leslie, Bl. 
Files, Charles Harper, Ch. Eng. 



Woodfords $ K 2 House 

Presque Isle K 2 House 

Caribou * K 2 House 

Worcester, Mass. 304 H. H. Hall 
Auburn 6 X House 

Portland 3> H K House 

Cooper 103 H. H. Hall 

Biddeford <£ r A House 

Millinocket 201 H. H. Hall 

Foxboro, Mass. 2 X House 

Guilford <£ r A House 

Solon <I> H K House 

Great Works Great Works 

Bangor 20 Seventh Street, Bangor 
East Boston, Mass. Mayo Street 
Beverly, Mass. Park Street 

Veazie R. F. D. 7, Bangor 

Lewiston 11 Pond Street 

Lynn, Mass. ATA House 

Sangerville A X A House 

Harrison K 2 House 

Bangor 186 Essex Street, Bangor 
Haverhill, Mass. X House 

Hillside 208 H. H. Hall 

Turner's Falls, Mass. 6 X House 
Bangor A T Q House 

South Paris 104 H. H. Hall 

Kent's Hill 2 A E House 

Augusta 180 Main Street 

Warren Balentine Hall 

Vineyard Haven, Mass. 

College Street 
Farmington 211 H. H. Hall 

Island Falls Grove Street 

Salisbury Cove 2 N House 

East Wilton 409 H. H. Hall 

Oakland A T ft House 

South Hanson, Mass K 2 House 
East Corinth 210 H. H. Hall 

Portland 3> K 2 House 



258 



CATALOG OF STUDENTS 



Foss, Charles Earl, Me. 


Woodfords 


7 Pleasant Street 


French, Marian Elizabeth, Si. 


Fort Fairfield 


Balentine Hall 


Froberger, George Auguste Joseph, 






Ch. Eng. 


Augusta 


2 A E House 


Frye, Francis Smith, Ag. 


Camden 


56 Park Street 


Fuller, Oliver Addison, Me. 


Mexico 


2 X House 


Furey, John Glynn, Es. 


Bangor 


9 X House 



Garland, Ernest Leonard, Ee. 
Gaskill, David Mijamin, Fy. 
Giles, Cornelius Francis, Me. 
Goggin, Francis James, Es. 
Gooch, Marjorie Eunice, He. 
Goodwin, Charles Gile, Es. 
Goodwin, John Elmer, Ch. 
Googins, Richard Lucien, Me. 
Gorden, Walter Lincoln, Me. 
Gordon, Samuel Frederick, Ch. 
Gould, Clifford Perkins, Ee. 
Greene, John Cornelius, Ag. 
Haley, Blanche Lillian, He. 
Hall, Ella May, He. 
Hall, Elliot Edgar, Fy. 
Hansen, Milton Christopher, Me. 
Hanson, Ivan Stevens, Me. 

Hardy, Carl Edward, Ag. 

Harmon, Perley Francis, Ag. 
Harriman, Stanley, Ch. 
Harrington, Randall Alfred, Me, 
Harris, Joseph Freeman, Ag. 
Harris, Leon Carlton, Ch. 
Harthorn, Marion Louise, Fr. 
Haskell, Clara Louise, Lt. 
Haskins, Elwina Lewis, He. 
Haynes, Charles Albert, Fy. 
Hitchings, Kathryn Estelle, Si. 
Hoagland, Webster Conley, Ch. 



Old Town Old Town 

Blackstone, Mass. A X A House 
Peabody, Mass. 2 N House 

Orono 21 Main Street 

Taunton, Mass. Balentine Hall 
Springvale 102 H. H. Hall 

St. Albans $TA House 

Biddeford 403 H. H. Hall 

Livermore Falls 102 H. H. Hall 
Lincoln $> E n House 

Kennebunkport $ V A House 

Peabody, Mass. ATA House 

South Brewer Mt. Vernon House 
Brewer Mt. Vernon House 

Vinalhaven 401 H. H. Hall 

Vernon, Conn. Park Street 

Winter Harbor 

80 North Main Street 
Bangor 

YZA Parkview Avenue, Bangor 
Caribou 404 H. H. Hall 

Gardiner 211 Oak Hall 

South Bristol $> H K House 

Patten K 2 House 

Portland A X A House 

Mil ford Balentine Hall 

Steuben Balentine Hall 

Saco Balentine Hall 

Ellsworth 2 X House 

Caribou Balentine Hall 

Concord Junction, Mass. 

A X A House 



259 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Hobbs, Vernon French, Ce. 
Hodgkins, Earl Asmond, Ce. 
Holden, Clyde Thaddeus, Ee. 
Holt, Stanley Norris, Ce. 
Hopkins, Adele Cecilia, He. 
Hopkins, Ray Clifford, Ee. 
Howard, Joel Hayden, Ag. 
Hudson, Myron Terry, Ag. 
Hughey, John Millard, Ch. Eng. 
Hurley, Alice Mary, Fr. 
Hussey, Leroy Fogg, Es. 
Hussey, Wayne Blethen, Ag. 
johonnett, Helen Rowe, Hy. 

Jones, Samuel Everett, Ee. 
Jordan, Ruth, Fr. 
Judkins, Eshburn Oscar, Me. 
Kelley, Edward Henry, Me. 
Kendall, Ralph Miles, Ee. 
King, Earl Christopher, Es. 
Kirk, Edward Benedict, Es. 
Knowlton, Norman Perley, Es. 
Larrabee, Clifford Prentiss, Ch. Eng. 
Lawler, Mark Robinson, Ce. 
Lawrence, Arthur Neal, Ee. 
Lawry, Emerson Chase, Ch. Eng. 
Lewis, Carl Arthur Randall, Ag. 
Libby, Bernard Augustus, Ee. 
Lloyd, Katherine Marie, Eh. 
Lord, Frank Wadleigh, Ag. 
Lowell, Arthur Wilbur, Ch. Eng. 
Luce, Ralph Trueman, Me. 
Lurvey, Preston Eugene, Ch. 
Macquarrie, Kenneth Godfrey, Jr., 

Ch. 
Mahoney, John Clinton, Ch. Eng. 
Marsh, Bernard Church, Fy. 
Martin, Willis Gilman, Bl. 
Melcher, Edmund Capron, Ag. 
Merrow, Lawrence Earle, Ee. 



Mattawamkeag 404 H. H. Hall 

Jefferson A X A House 

Sabatius 305 Oak Hall 

Dorchester, Mass. A X A House 

Old Town Old Town 

Camden 401 H. H. Hall 

Lewiston ATA House 

Winthrop Mill Street 

Long Island 5^ Peters Street 

Frankfort Old Town 

Augusta 2 A E House 

Dark Harbor * K 2 House 
Hampden Highlands 

Hampden Highlands 

Augusta A T Q House 

Old Town Old Town 

Upton 112 Oak Hall 
Bangor 52 Essex Street, Bangor 

Biddeford 2 A E House 

Orono 23 Broadway 

Bar Harbor 2 N House 

Orono Grove Street 

Old Town Old Town 
Southwest Harbor 404 Oak Hall 

North Lubec ATA House 

Fairfield B 9 II House 

Augusta 2 A E House 

Limerick Pine Street 

Brewer Brewer 

Kezar Falls K 2 House 

Portland K 2 House 

Farmington 211 H. H. Hall 

Island Falls Grove Street 

Portland ATA House 

Biddeford 403 H. H. Hall 

Dexter A X A House 

Woodfords <£ r A House 

Cumberland Mills 2 X House 

Saco A T ft House 



260 



CATALOG OF STUDENTS 



Mitchell, Arthur Raymond, Ag. 
Mitchell, Myron Atwood, Ee. 
Mooney, Lawrence Henry, Hy. 
Mooney, Richard Henry, Hy. 
Moore, Millard George, Ch. Eng. 
MacDonald, Maxwell Eugene, Bl. 
MacDonnell, Reginald Hugh, Ch. 
Niles, Charles Fernald, Ce. 
Norcross, Evans Barkley, Es. 
Northrup, Christine Adelia, Lt. 
Noyes, Kenneth Bradford, Me. 
Ohnemus, Clifford Andrews, Me. 
Owen, Robert Roak, Ee. 
Parsons, Earle Odber, Ee. 
Peckham, Earle Stuart, Ag. 

Perry. Benjamin Cowl, Jr., Ms. 
Pierce, Harold Merle, Es. 
Piper, Dorothy Eva, Gm. 
Pitts, Samuel Lee, Fy. 
Plummer, Norman Dyer, Ce, 
Polakewich, Abraham, Ee. 
Poor, Charles Montgomery, Ce, 
Pratt, Fanny Louise, He. 

Prince, Jessie May, Eh. 
Pulsifer, James Hayes, Ag. 
Ranger, Ralph Augustine, Me. 
Rapp, Herbert Victor, Ch. 
Ring, Arthur Andrew, Me, 
Robbins, Hamlyn Nelson, Ag. 
Rowe, Allen Bedford, Ag. 
Rumill, George Edwin, Ce. 
Russell, George Frederick, Ag. 
Ryan, Stephen Joseph, Me. 
Sawyer, Ethel Beatrice, Fr. 
Scott, Edith May, Gm. 
Scott, Ethel Lue, Gm. 
Sears, Albert Johnson, Ce. 
Segal, Abraham, Bl. 



Sabatttis 110 Oak Hall 

South Berwick X House 

Berlin, N. H. R. F. D. 7, Bangor 
Worcester, Mass. College Street 
Old Town Old Town 

Bangor, 257 State Street, Bangor 
Ayer, Mass 88 Main Street 

Rumford 312 Oak Hall 

Portland 3> T A House 

Orono 61 Bennoch Street 

Orono Forest Avenue 

Waltham, Mass. K 2 House 

Auburn <i> H K House 

Patten 84 Park Street 

Bangor 

22 Summit Avenue, Bangor 
Rockland $ T A House 

Norridgewock <f> H K House 

Fairfield Balentine Hall 

Harrison 2 N House 

Dorchester, Mass. 301 H. H. Hall 
Biddeford 4> E n House 

Andover 402 H. H. Hall 

North New Portland 

Balentine Hall 
Yarmouth Mt. Vernon House 

Auburn 412 H. H. Hall 

Dryden 2 N House 

Turners Falls, Mass. A X A House 
Orono 3 Summer Street 

Scarboro 2 X House 

Portland <i> H K House 

Mount Desert 81 Mill Street 

Methuen, Mass. 7 Pleasant Street 
Ayer, Mass. 249 Main Street 

South Portland Balentine Hall 

Wolfeboro, N. H. Balentine Hall 
Wolfeboro, N. H. Balentine Hall 
Woodfords 2 A E House 

Lewiston 13 Pond Street 



261 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Shaw, Burton Alfred, Ag. 
Sherman, Elmo Linwood, Eh. 
Sinnett, Ralph Vernon, Ch. 
Smallidge, Orman Samuel, Me. 
Smiley, Floyd Franklin, Ag. 
Smiley, Samuel Raymond, Ag. 
Smith, Fay, Gm. 
Smith, Raymond James, Me. 
Spear, Estelle Paulina, Ag. 
Steadman, Donald Melville, Hy. 
Stephenson, Clarence Baker, Ch. 
Stoddard, Edgar Addington, Ch. 
Strout, Harold Kimball, Ee. 
Stubbs, Marian Esther, He. 
Sturgis, Alfred Chamberlain, Ag. 
Swan, William Francis, Ch. Eng. 
Sweatt, Cecil Clayton, Es. 
Swicker, Lester Clayton, Ee. 
Taylor, Enid Dorothy, Hy. 
Taylor, William Henry, Es. 
Thomas, Albert Hale, Es. 
Tibbetts, Louis Elmore, Ag. 
Tierney, Arthur Joseph, Me. 
Tozier, Alton Warren, Me. 
Tracy, Frank Alton, Ee. 
Trask, Newell Jefferson, Ag. 
True, Nathan Frank, Ch. 
True, Norman Evans, Ee. 
Tupper, Ernest Grant, Ag. 
Turgeon, Henry Wallace, Ch. 
Upham, Warren Pratt, Fy. 
Vaughan, Natalie Alice, Ms. 
Wade, Elmer Joseph, Ee. 
Wallingford, Vernon Howard, Ch. 

Eng. 
Webber, Paul Franklin, Ag. 
Weeks, Donald Ross, Ag. 
Weisman, Samuel, Ch. Eng. 
Wellington, Linwood Wiley, Ch. 
Wheeler, Ella Adams, Eh. 



Mt 



H. 



Sanford 

Brewer 

Brewer 

Northeast Harbor 

Caribou 

Waterville 

Machias Mt 

South Brewer 

South Portland 

Bridgton 

Portland 

Portland 

Portland 

Buck sport 

Auburn 

Berlin, N, 

Andover 

Townsend, Mass. 

North Sullivan 

Rumford 

Lincoln 

Lyman 

We st field, Mass. 

Litchfield 

Cherryfield 

South Jefferson 

Freeport 

Woodfords 

Princeton 

Auburn 

Pasadena, 

Orono 

Richmond 

Auburn 



Cal. 



309 Oak Hall 

Brewer 

Brewer 

Grove Street 

$ K 2 House 

212 H. H. Hall 

Vernon House 

G X House 

Balentine Hall 

Stillwater 

Ben House 

102 H. H. Hall 

404 H. H. Hall 

Vernon House 

2 N House 

Main Street 

$ H K House 

201 H. H. Hall 
Balentine Hall 

312 Oak Hall 

* K 2 House 

10 Park Street 

2 A E House 

112 Oak Hall 

27 Park Street 

Park Street 

202 H. H. Hall 
A X A House 
Forest Avenue 

B0n House 

29 Pond Street 

Park Street 

College Street 

* H K House 



Kennebunk 

Rockland 

Portland 

Caribou 

Bangor 



408 H. H. Hall 

Park Street 

* E n House 

$ K 2 House 

Mt. Vernon House 



262 



CATALOG OF STUDENTS 



Whitehouse, Ralph Murch, Ag. 
Whitehouse, Thurle Stevens, Ee. 
Wight, Willard, Es. 
Wilkins, Ralph Allen, Ch. Eng. 
Williams, Randall Vaughan, Ag. 
Winslow, Willis Stone, Ce. 
Wood, Ralph Harold, Ee. 
Wooster, Kenneth Thorndike, Es. 
Yeaton, Russell Powers, Fy. 
Young, Kenneth Thwing, Bl. 
Ziegler, Charles Melvin, Ag. 



Fort Fairfield 
Portland 
Berlin, N. H. 
Beverly, Mass. 
Lisbon Falls 
Waldoboro 
Togus 
Rockport 
Belgrade 
Arlington, Mass. 



2 
2 
305 H 
A T 
107 
210 H 
K 
2 
202 H, 
2 



South Boston, Mass. B 



X House 
N House 
. H. Hall 
ft House 
Oak Hall 
. H. Hall 
2 House 
X House 
, H. Hall 
X House 
n House 



FRESHMEN 



Abramson, Lewis, Arts. 
Adams, James Campbell, Ee. 
Allen, Lyman Edgar, Ch. Eng. 
Alley, Frank Oren, An. 
Anderson, William Henry, Ee. 
Atkinson, Horace Barker, Me. 
Atwood, Gilbert Humphrey, Ce. 
Atwood, Lewis Gerald, Ee. 
Aver ill, Walter Boardman, Ch. Eng. 
Avery, Willard Crissey, Eng. 
Bach, Alma Gertrude, He. 
Bagley, Harold Herbert, Ag. 
Bannister, Leslie, Ce. 
Barbeau, Joseph Wilfrid, Me. 
Barber, Roscoe Hall, Ee. 
Barker, Iva Viola, He. 
Barney, George Curtis, Ee. 
Barron, John Stekley, Fy. 
Bartlett, Frances Dorothea, He. 
Barton, Lawrence Price, Ag. 
Beal, Ivan Everett, Ag. 
Beale, Clara Helen, He. 
Beck, Joseph Thomas, Arts 
Berg, Werner Henry Carl, Ch. 
Berliawsky, Frank Nathan, Arts. 
Berman, Harry, Arts 



Portland 
Cherryfield 
Portland 
Bar Harbor 



3> E n House 

2 A E House 

106 Oak Hall 

2 X House 



Bangor 122 Lincoln Street, Bangor 

Morrill 20 Grove Street 

Taunton, Mass. 15 Park Street 

Eastport 2 N House 

Stillwater Stillwater 

Stamford, Conn. $ K 2 House 

Orono Penobscot Street 

Presque Isle 36 Grove Street 

Cornish 111 Ook Hall 

Anson 105 Main Street 

Portland X House 

Auburn Old Town 
Berlin, N. H. R. F. D. 7, Bangor 

Saco A T fi House 

Orono College Street 

Waterville College Street 

Jonesport 15 Park Street 

Orono 33 Peters Street 

Augusta ATA House 
New Britain, Conn. 23 Park Street 

Waterville 110 H. H. Hall 

Lewiston <i> E U House 



263 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Besse, Frank Arnold, Arts 
Bisbee, Mildred Tressa Wheaton,Arts 
Black, Howard Preston, Eng. 
Blanchard, Esther Mildred, Arts 
Bonfilio, Louis John, Ch. Eng. 
Borjesson, Thomas Whitmore, An. 
Boynton, Ray Maurice, Ce. 
Brackett, Virginia Mae, He. 
Brown, Edward Herbert, Ag. 
Brown, Harry Carpenter, Ag. 
Brown, Richard Amos, Ee. 
Bruce, Harold Lincoln, Ag. 
Bryant, Clarence Philip, Me. 
Budway, Lillian Lucy, Arts 
Burden, Marjorie Helen, Arts 
Burke, Walter Edward, Arts 
Bussell, Dorothea Mabel, Arts 
Bussel!, Stephen Reginald, Arts 
Butler, Harry, Ch. 
Butler, Henry Russ, Ee. 
Campbell, Donald Edward, Ag. 
Carter, Horace Leighton, Arts 
Casey, Roy Leon, Ag. 
Cates, Lewis Goodwin, Ce. 
Chadbourne, Walter Whitmore, Arts 
Chandler, Florence Libby, Arts 
Chaplin, Raymond Washington, Ag. 
Charles, William Harry, Ce. 
Chase, Olive, Arts 
Christianson, Elmer Emmons Ag. 
Churchill, Warren Stanley, Arts 
Clair, Vera Alice, Arts 

Clark, Donald Shackley, Ch. 
Clarke, Eleanor Laura, Arts 
Clifford, Charles Fenton, Ce. 

Conners, Irene White, Arts 
Cony, Roland Francis, Arts 
Copeland, Hazel Yates, Arts 



Albion A T House 

Berlin, N. H. Mt. Vernon House 

Bangor 312 H. H. Hall 

Springvale Balentine Hall 

Portland 110 H. H. Hall 

Richmond 2 Forest Avenue 

Skowhegan 203 H. H. Hall 

Milo Balentine Hall 

Bethel Grove Street 

Bethel Old Town 

Dixfield 80 Mill Street 

Lebanon College Street 

Lincoln * r A House 

Orono 56 Middle Street 

Orono 54 Hill Street 

Portland A T ft House 

Old Town Old Town 

Old Town Old Town 

Bangor $ T A House 

Portland 201 H. H. Hall 

Island Falls 25 Grove Street 

Bar Harbor 10 Park Street 

East Dixfield 411 H. H. Hall 

Munroe Mill Street 

Danforth 14 Bennoch Street 

Newcastle Balentine Hall 

Cornish $ H K House 

Portland 55 Park Street 

Bluehill Balentine Hall 

Portland A T ft House 

Waterville Pond Street 
Shelburne Falls, Mass. 

Mt. Vernon House 

Milford Milford 

Pemaquid Balentine Hall 
Millinocket 

56 Summer Street, Bangor 

Sullivan College Street 

Augusta 111 H. H. Hall 

Brewer Mt. Vernon House 



264 



CATALOG OF STUDENTS 



Coughlin, Mary Anna, Arts 
Couri, Arthur Najeeb, Ch. 
Couri, Dewey William, Arts 
Courtney, Horace Sears, Ch. 
Cousins, Herbert Burnham, Me. 
Crane, George Wilson, Ce. 
Crosby, Harold Dunmore, Arts 
Cross, Charlotte Geneva, Arts 
Croteau, Antonio Livi, Me. 
Crowley, Frances, Arts 

Croxford, Geneva, Arts 
Currier, Stanley Morison, Ch. Eng. 
Cushman, George Mason, Ce. 
Cushman, Robert Neal, Ag. 
Cuskley, Dorothy Thomas, Arts 
Davidson, James Howard, Ce. 
Davis, Howard Forest, Me. 
Davis, John Joseph, Ag. 
Davis, Max Donald, Arts 
DeCourcy, Paul, Ch. 
Deering, Lawrence Ezekiel, Ee. 
Dempsey, Plinn Duttruss, Ch. 
Diehl, Edwayne Philip, Arts 
Dodge, Maynard Burnham, Ag. 
Dow, William Reed, Ee. 
Drew, Vinal Eugene, Arts 
Duncan, Kenneth James, Ee. 
Dunn, Barbara, Arts 
Dunton, John Albert, Fy. 
Dyer, Isabel Hayden, Arts 
Eaton, Frank Newell, Jr., Ag. 
Edgerly, Glenn Eldred, Ce. 
Eldridge, John Seward, Ag. 
Elliott, Priscilla Goldthwaite, Arts 
Enander, Fred Conrad, Arts 
Epstein, Anna Pauline, Arts 
Fabian, Marvel, He. 
Farnsworth, Kenneth Clyde, Arts 
Farrar, Clarissa Palmer, Arts 



Rockland Balentine Hall 

Portland ATA House 

Portland ATA House 

Boston, Mass. 212 H. H. Hall 

Brewer <£ T A House 

Foxcroft 2 N House 

Wollaston, Mass. 205 H. H. Hall 
Rockland Balentine Hall 

Phillips College Street 

Bangor 

15 Forest Avenue, Bangor 
Brewer Brewer 

Brewer $ K 2 House 

Portland 3> H K House 

Kenduskeag 9 X House 

Portland Balentine Hall 

Guilford <£> T A House 

Rumford 80 Mill Street 

Veazie R. F. D. 7, Bangor 

Portland $ E n House 

Bucksport R. F. D. 8, Bangor 

Hollis Center 108 Oak Hall 

Mattapan, Mass. 2 X House 

New Britain, Conn. Park Street 
Old Town Old Town 

Bangor 15 Dean Street, Bangor 
Ashland 304 H. H. Hall 

Washburn 411 H. H. Hall 

Orono 51 Bennoch Street 

Skowhegan 411 Oak Hall 

Cape Elizabeth Balentine Hall 

Winterport Peters Street 

Unity $ r A House 

Kennebunkport ATI] House 

Guilford Mt. Vernon House 

Willimantic, Conn. 23 Park Street 
Bangor 303 Essex Street, Bangor 
Milo Balentine Hall 

Islesford 206 Oak Hall 

Princeton Balentine Hall 



265 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Faulkingham, Bertram Nash, Ee. 
Field, Kenneth Jackman, Ag. 
Fitzgerald, Paul Andrew, Arts 
Flavell, Paul Irving, Ce. 
Fogg, Merle Leslie, Arts 
Fossett, Edward Carroll, Ag. 
Foyle, Raymond Henry, Ch. Eng. 

Frawley, Alfred Cecil, Eng. 
Freeland, James Horatio, Arts 
Freeman, Arthur Clyde, Jr., Ch. 
French, Arthur Herbert, Ch. Eng. 
French, Dwight Millard, Eng. 
French, Minerva Evelyn, Arts 
Friend, Francis Howard, Fy. 
Frost, Howard Robinson, Ch. 
Gantnier, Jerome Benedict, Ag. 
Gardiner, Henry Mj'gatt, Fy. 
Garman, Ellen Mary, He. 
Gaudreau, Armand Theophane, Ee. 
Getchell, Angela Elizabeth, He. 
Giberson, Claude Trafton, Arts 
Gilman, Leona Mae, He. 
Ginsberg, George Snow, Ee. 
Glidden, Carl Maddocks, Ce. 
Glover, Stanton, Ch. 
Godfrey, Ralph Hugh, Ag. 
Coding, Ray Irving, Eng. 
Goodwin, Bernard Valmon, Me. 
Goodwin, Jason Lancelot, Ag. 
Gorden, Kathryn Elizabeth, Arts 
Gray, Harland Alexander, Ee. 
Gribbin, Vinton Earle, Ch. Eng 
Guptill, Samuel, Arts 
Hacker, Edward Prince, Eng. 
Hackett, Ruby Marie, He. 
Hall, Edward Coleman, Me. 

Hall, Harold Gilmore, Eng. 
Ham, Miles Frank, Eng. 



West Jonesport A X A House 

Guilford 401 H. H. Hall 

Bath 23 Park Street 

Hanover, Mass. 2 N House 

West Enfield Main Street 

Bristol Box 182, Orono 

East Bridgewater, Mass. 

104 H. H. Hall 
Bangor 84 Ohio Street, Bangor 
Bangor B n House 

Providence, R. I. 2 X House 

Brewer Brewer 

North Anson 307 H. H. Hall 

Rumford Balentine Hall 

Skowhegan K 2 House 

South Lewiston 204 Oak Hall 

Benedicta 84 Park Street 

Stonington, Conn. A X A House 
Bangor Balentine Hall 

Lewiston Park Street 

Orono Mill Street 

Groveton, N. H. 309 H. H. Hall 
Woodfords Balentine Hall 

Bangor 177 Essex Street, Bangor 
Waldoboro 203 H. H. Hall 

Rockland 2 X House 

Litchfield 407 Oak Hall 

Presque Isle North Main Street 
Fort Edward, N. Y. 107 Oak Hall 
East Corinth Peters Street 

Livermore Falls Balentine Hall 
Old Town Old Town 

Portland B n House 

Topsham Pond Street 

Brunswick 3> H K House 

New Vineyard Mt. Vernon House 
Great Chebeague Island 

29 Pond Street 
Rockland $ H K House 

Augusta $ K 2 House 



266 



CATALOG OF STUDENTS 



Hamm, Clifton Marshall, Arts 
Harkness, Vinton Orris, Me. 
Harmon, Max Carlton, Arts 
Harper. Herbert Leon, Arts 
Harriman, Alonzo Jesse, Ee, 
Harriman, Philip Ainslee, Ce. 
Harvey, Ruth Josephine, Arts 
Hersom, Arthur Syphus, Arts 
Higgins, Raymond Dyer, Ch. Eng. 
Hitchings, Herbert William, Arts 
Hodgdon, Paul Edward, Ch. Eng. 
Hodgkins, Harold Winslow, Me. 
Hodgkins, Lawrence James, Me. 
Holbrook, Dorothy York, He. 
Holden, Edward Wight, Ag. 
Hotham, Charles Ernest, Ag. 
Howard, Frank Weston, Ee. 
Howard, Henry Young, Ee. 
Howe, Olga Lilla, Arts 
Howell, Richard Henry, Ce. 
Hughes, Joseph Francis, Me. 
Hunter, Ruth Christobel, He. 
Hunton, Oramell Elwood, Ee. 
Hutchinson, Lawrence A, Me. 
Ingersoll, Dorothy Ruth, Arts 
Ingraham, Dwight Marden, Ee. 
Jackson, Irene Chase, He. 
Jackson, LeRoy Sidney, Fy. 
Jackson, Mary Eleanor, He. 
Jennys, Blanche Ellen, He. 
Johnson, Albert Edwin, Ce. 
Johnson, Carl Selwin, Arts 
Johnson, Helen Lindsay, He. 
Johnson, Lorin Baker, Arts. 
Johnson, Pearl Ernest, Ag. 
Johnson, Winnifred Viola, Arts 
Jones, Bryant Emerson, Fy. 
Jones, Eliphalet Prentiss, Arts 
Jones, Fred Richard, Arts 
Jones, Sylvia Eames, He. 



Monroe R. F. D. 7, Bangor 

Lincolnville 2 A E House 

Buxton 402 Oak Hall 

Calais 180 Main Street 

Bath 111 H. H. Hall 

Westport 36 Grove Street 

Orono Mt. Vernon House 

Blaine 38 North Main Street 

Denny sville 84 Park Street 

Caribou B 9 II House 

Cliftondale, Mass. 2 X House 

Bar Harbor 2 N House 

West Harpswell 404 H. H. Hall 
Rockland Balentine Hall 

Melrose, Mass. <t> K 2 House 

Patten K 2 House 

Dexter 36 Grove Street 

Winslow K 2 House 

Ashland Balentine Hall 

Portland 2 X House 

Winter port Peters Street 

Rockland Balentine Hall 

Portland $ H K House 

Caribou <£ K 2 House 

Orono Balentine Hall 

Bangor 78 Grant Street, Bangor 
Waterville Balentine Hall 

South Thomaston Peters Street 
Everett, Mass. Balentine Hall 

Belfast Balentine Hall 

New Britain, Conn. Park Street 
Portland B 9 n House 

Brownville Balentine Hall 

Fitchburg, Mass. 2 X House 

New Gloucester Pine Street 

Appleton Mt. Vernon House 

Bangor 312 H. H. Hall 

East Boothbay $ H K House 

Stratton 403 Oak Hall 

Bangor Mt. Vernon House 



267 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Jordan, Fred Thompson, Arts 
Jordan, George Hart, Arts 
Judkins, Lacy Winslow, Ch. Eng. 
Kennison, Edward Earle, Fy. 
Kenniston, Luther Edward, Arts 
Kewer, Howard Vincent, Ch. Eng. 
King, Corinne Mary, Arts 
King, Milton Everett, Ee. 
King, Rufus Brooks, Ee. 
Kneeland, Edwin Leroy, Arts 
Kneeland, Omer Archibald, Ch. Eng. 
Krinsky, Silas Jack, Arts 
Lambert, Donald Greene, Ch. Eng. 
Landers, Carleton Ames, Ag. 
Lappin, John Joseph, Ch. Eng. 
Laughlin, Donald Stuart, Me. 
Leary, Philip John, Ce. 
LeGrow, Carl Augustus, Ag. 
Lehr, Arthur Levi, Ag. 
Libby, Lawrence Packard, Ag. 
Libby, Philip Allen, Ce. 
Libby, Richard Melville, Ag. 
Lingley, Alfred Beverly, Ch. Eng. 
Littlefield, Doris, Arts 
Loftus, Victor Harold, Fy. 
Lovely, Elmer Raymond, Ag. 
Lucas, John Wilbur, Arts 
Manchester, John Heath, Ee. 
Mansfield, Edward Augustus, Arts 
March, Lindsay Jackson, Arts 
Marden, Allen Harriman, Ee. 
Marsh, Alice Holbrook, He. 
Marshall, Leon Otis, Ag. 
Maxfield, Marie Avery, Arts 
Merrill, Doris Pauline, Arts 
Merrill, Marion Lees, He. 
Merry, Matthew Henry, Ce. 

Merry, Silas Everett, Ee. 



Farmington 2 A E House 

Portland B n House 

Dixfield 80 Mill Street 

North New Portland 3> H K House 
Amherst 77 Mill Street 

Waverly, Mass. K 2 House 

Orono Pleasant Street 

South Brewer South Brewer 

Peabody, Mass. 7 Park Street 

Princeton 412 H. H. Hall 

Princeton 412 H. H. Hall 

Ogunquit <£ E n House 

Readfield Depot X House 

Easton R. F. D. 7, Bangor 

Portland B n House 

Portland 2 X House 

East Lynn, Mass. 2 Forest Avenue 
Portland 303 Oak Hall 

Hallowell 408 Oak Hall 

Portland B n House 

Gorham 2 N House 

South Portland 309 Oak Hall 

Portland 2 X House 

Stratham, N. H. Balentine Hall 
Lawrence, Mass. 55 Park Street 
Presque Isle Box 214, Orono 

Portland X House 

Northeast Harbor 311 Oak Hall 
Jonesport.. College Street 

Easton 111 H. H. Hall 

Beverly, Mass. 88 Main Street 

Guilford Mt. Vernon House 

Topsham Bennoch Street 

Bangor 151 Essex Street, Bangor 
Bluchill Balentine Hall 

Gray 23 Mill Street 

Vineyard Haven, Mass. 

203 Oak Hall 
Vineyard Haven, Mass. 

203 Oak Hall 



268 



CATALOG OF STUDENTS 



Mills, Bessie Harding, Arts 
Mills, Marguerite, Arts 
Mitchell, Margaret Irene, Arts 
Mitchell, Walter James, Me. 
Moody, Ralph Clifford, Fy. 
Morse, Joseph Peter, Me. 
Moulton, Alfred Kimball, Ee. 
Mulvaney, Arthur Danforth, Ee. 
Murphy, Norman Bernard, Arts 
Murray, Agnes DeMings, Arts 
MacBride, Winthrop Lawrence, Arts 
MacGee, Albert Carlton, Ch. Eng. 
MacKenney, Leroy Nelson, Eng. 
MacKenzie, Bert Alexander, Arts 
MacLeod, Florence Evelyn, Arts 
McCabe, James Richard, Ee. 
McCabe, John Francis, Ce. 
McCann, John Harding, Eng. 
McCobb, Clayton Raphael, Arts 
McCrystle, Kathleen Emily, Arts 
McDonald, Robert Joseph, Jr., Ce. 
McFarland, Ella Johnston, Arts 
McGlauflin, Evelyn, Arts 
McGouldrick, Philip Clare, Ch. Eng. 
McGraw, Earl Cranston, Arts 
Mclntire, Merrill Hamilton, Ce. 
McManus, Edward Leo, Ee. 
Nealey, Everett Thornton, Jr., Arts 
Newton, Russell Vaughan, Ch. 
Nickerson, Gerard Horace Salathiel, 

Ee. 
Nolan, John Paul, Arts 
Norton, Edward Lawry, Ee. 
Ober, Ernest Deering, Ag. 
O'Leary, Frederick Charles, Arts 

Orcutt, Leon Monroe, Arts 
O'Rourke, Lawrence Albert, Ch. Eng. 
Packard, David Carroll, Ag. 
Paganucci, Romeo Joe, Ch. Eng. 



Bangor Mt. Vernon House 

Bangor Mt. Vernon House 

Orono 14 Park Street 

Seymour, Conn. 405 H. H. Hall 
New Britain, Conn. Park Street 
Abbott Pine Street 

Alfred College Street 

Bangor 35 Pleasant Street, Bangor 
Augusta 20 Grove Street 

Boothbay Harbor Balentine Hall 
Portland X House 

Portland 2 X House 

Orono Penobscot Street 

Orono Forest Avenue 

Old Town Old Town 

Kennebunkport 6 X House 

Worcester, Mass. ATA House 
Bangor 74 Birch Street, Bangor 
Center Lincolnville Campus 

Berlin, N. H. Mt. Vernon House 
Methuen, Mass. 2 A E House 

New Harbor Balentine Hall 

Baring Balentine Hall 

Augusta University Inn 

South Orringion 33 Peters Street 
Mapleton Main Street 

Bangor 183 Third Street, Bangor 
Bangor 402 H. H. Hall 

Jackman 55 Park Street 

Lubec 302 Oak Hall 

Fitchburg, Mass. 36 Grove Street 

Rockland 10 Park Street 

Atkinson College Street 
Bangor 

64 West Broadway, Bangor 

Gouldsboro 3 Middle Street 

Saco Forest Avenue 

Marion, Mass. 103 H. H. Hall 

WatervilU K 2 House 



269 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Page, Lena Beatrice, He. 
Palmer, Addison Boutelle, Ee. 
Palmer, Beatrice Chase, Arts 
Park, Wilbur Abbott, Eng. 
Parker, Harold Gordon, Ch. 
Parsons, Dorothy, Arts 
Peabody, Gertrude Devitt, He. 
Pelletier, Henry Joseph, Ce. 
Perkins, Earl Halcot, Ce. 
Perry, Clark, Arts 
Peterson, Christian William, Arts 
Piper, Karl Prescott, Ch. 
Porter, Wesley Fletcher, Ag. 
Potter, George Alva, Fy. 
Power, Percy Allen, Ch. Eng. 
Powers, Stella Florence, Arts 
Pratt, Daniel Beals, Ag. 
Prince, Rufus, Eng. 
Pulsifer, Mary Augusta, He. 
Ranney, Thaddeus Thorndike, Ce. 
Read, Marion Izora, Arts 
Reardon, Jeremiah Timothy, Arts 
Rice Richard Gorman, Fy. 
Rich, Edmund Henry, Ag. 
Richards, Henry Lane, Arts 
Richardson, Flavia Lucile, Arts 
Rickard, Barclay, Arts 
Riley, Edwin Alden, Ch. Eng. 
Robbins, Earle Raymond, Ch. Eng. 
Robbins, Maurice Smiley, Ee. 
Roberts, Everett Louis, Ee. 
Robinson, Arthur James, Ag. 
Robinson, Joseph Sidney, Ch. Eng. 
Rosenthal, Samuel Charles, Ee. 
Rossiter, Sherman, Me. 
Rumill, Edna Lora, Arts 
Russell, Carl Asa, Me. 
Sanborn, Clarence Winfred, Me. 
Sargent, Carl Aaron, Arts 
Schenck, Frederick Van Nydick, Arts 
Schoonmaker, John Howard, Ce. 



Kingfield Balentine Hall 

Bangor K 2 House 
Bangor 14 Garland Street, Bangor 

Orono 42 Mill Street 

Foxcroft $ T A House 

Rye, N. H. Balentine Hall 

Princeton Balentine Hall 

St. David Park Street 

Abbot Village Pine Street 

Machias K 2 House 

Portland College Street 

Fairfield 311 H. H. Hall 

Patten 36 Grove Street 

Mystic, Conn. College Street 

Lincoln $ K 2 House 

Orono 10 Pine Street 

Wilton 409 H. H. Hall 

Turner 310 H. H. Hall 

Auburn Balentine Hall 

Winn $K2 House 

Orono Bennoch Street 

Portland K 2 House 

Fitchburg, Mass. 204 H. H. Hall 

Portland $TA House 

Portland $TA House 

Old Town Old Town 

Denver, Col. 403 Oak Hall 

Uvermore Falls 204 H. H. Hall 

Livermore Falls 204 H. H. Hall 

Augusta Box 182, Orono 
Bangor, 16 Highland Ave. Bangor 
Bangor 463 Main Street, Bangor 

Houlton 29 Pond Street 

Portland $ E n House 

Worcester, Mass. $ r A House 

Orono 81 Mill Street 

Portland 303 Oak Hall 

Lynn, Mass. 15 Park Street 
Westminster, Mass. A T fi House 

Millinocket B G II House 

Kingston, N.Y. 2 A E House 



270 



CATALOG OF STUDENTS 



Scrimgeour, Charles William, Arts 
Seekins, Herbert Leslie, Ag. 
Segal, Israel, Ag. 
Sellew, George Philip, Ce. 
Shaughnessy, Edward William, Ee, 

Shea, Oscar Albert, Arts 
Shoemaker, Wilbur Cartmell, Ee. 
Shorey, Leigh Temple, Ag. 
Simpson, Noil Howard, Ag. 
Small, Donald Wallace, Pm. 
Smith, Francis Earl, Ag. 

Snow, Eveline Foster, He. 
Snow, Kathleen May, Arts 
Spooner, John Clay, Ag. 
Staples, Harold Sanborn, Arts 
Starrett, Henry Atherton, Ag. 
Stearns, Robert Sylvester, Me. 
Stephens, Raymond Donnell, Fy. 
Stetson, Dorothea Hayward, Arts 
Stevens, Carl Thompson, Ag. 
Stevens, Maurice Hoyt, Me. 
Stevens, Theodore Moulton, Arts 
Stevens, Van Mitchell, Arts 
Stevens, Wingate Irving, Fy. 
Stevenson, William Stanley, Ee. 
Stewart, Clyde Wentworth, Ch. Eng. 
Stewart, Robert Barclay, Ch. 
Stodder, Russell Henry, Ag. 
Stone, Fred Clinton, Arts 
Sullivan, Alphonso Denis, Ch. Eng. 
Sullivan, Paul Damian, Ch. Eng. 
Tarr, Alice Lillian, He. 
Taylor, Arthur Samuel, Ce. 
Thomas, Daniel Joseph, Arts 
Thompson, Bernard Vinal, Ch. 
Thompson, Carl James, Me. 
Thompson, Robert White, Arts 
Thurston, Lester Ralph, Ee. 



Lewiston B G II House 

Hartland Garland Street, Bangor 
Lewiston 13 Pond Street 

Natick, Mass. 303 H. H. Hall 

Bangor 

8 South Park Street, Bangor 
Webster, Mass. * E II House 

Derby 9 X House 

Presque Isle Grove Street 

Sanford 210 Oak Hall 

East Machias College Street 

Northampton, Mass 

R. F. D. 7, Bangor 
Rockland Balentine Hall 

Rockland Balentine Hall 

Sherman Mills 7 Park Street 

Carthage 2 A E House 

Springfield, Mass. 409 H. H. Hall 
Wayland, Mass. 3> K 2 House 

Auburn B Q U House 

Houlton Balentine Hall 

Woodfords 208 Oak Hall 

Presque Isle <i> H K House 

Portland 310 Oak Hall 

Pittsfield 2 A E House 

Portland 310 Oak Hall 

Thorndike Grove Street 

Saco A T 12 House 

Waterville K 2 House 

Somerville, Mass. B n House 
Cornish 111 Oak Hall 

Berlin, N. H. College Street 

Biddeford 29 Pond Street 

Auburn Balentine Hall 

Methuen, Mass. 2 A E House 

Turner's Falls, Mass. 2 A E House 
Easton R. F. D. 7, Bangor 

Portland $TA House 

Fitchburg, Mass. 36 Grove Street 
Andover 402 H. H. Hall 



271 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Tinker, Herbert Dunbar, Eng. 
Tolman, Walter Sangster, Ch. Eng. 
Torrey, Norman Elvin, Arts 
Torsleff, Herbert St. John, Ag. 
Towne, George Herbert, Me. 
Townsend, George Manley, Ce. 
Tracy, Earle Bedford, Arts 
Trimm, Frederick Nathan, Ag. 
Tripp, Grace Gertrude, Arts 

Trueworthy, Ivan Acel, Arts 
Tuck, Alonzo Henry, Ag. 
Turner, Erwin Sibley, Eng. 
Turner, O'Dillon Charles, Arts 
Urann, Arthur Reed, Ee. 
Vaughan, Frederick Ray, Ch. 
Verder, Walter Montgomery, Fy. 
Wadlin, Swasey, Arts 
Waite, John Philip, Ch. Eng. 
Walker, Hortense Gilbert, He. 
Walker, Stuart Frederick, Arts 
Walsh, John Lawrence, Ch. 
Warren, Harold Howard, Arts 
Waterman, Burleigh Rumery, Ce. 
Watkins, Melvin Hawkes, Ce. 
Weed, Charles Clayton, Ag. 
Weed, George Wright, Ch. Eng. 
Weeks, Ralph Church, Arts 
Weeks, Victoria Olive, Arts 
Wellington, William Herbert, Fy. 

West, Frederic Roland, Me. 
Weybrant, Max Elisha, Fy. 
Weymouth, Ava Marie, Arts 
Whalen, Henry Edward, Arts 
Whalen, Oscar Livermore, Arts 
Whitcomb, Robert Campbell, Arts 
Whitcomb, Ruel Whitney, Arts 
White, Helen Patricia, Arts 
White, Walter Cornelius, Ce. 



Wolfeboro, N. H. 88 Main Street 
Portland 208 Oak Hall 

Stonington K 2 House 

Bangor 311 Oak Hall 

Waltham, Mass. * K 2 House 
Woodland 10 Park Street 

Winter Harbor 2 A E House 

East Corinth 25 Grove Street 
North New Portland 

Balentine Hall 
Rockland Grove Street 

Mapleton Box 152, Orono 

Topsham $ H K House 

Veazic R. F. D. 7, Bangor 

Egypt 109 Oak Hall 

Cherryfield A X A House 

Dorchester, Mass. ATA House 
Canton $ H K House 

Portland $ T A House 

Orono 11 Penobscot Street 

Livermore Falls 2 N House 

Norwich, Conn. 15 Park Street 
Kenduskeag R. F. D. 7, Bangor 
Portland B 6 II House 

Portland ATA House 

Houlton 29 Pond Street 

Thorndike 20 Grove Street 

Augusta 56 Park Street 

Winslow Balentine Hall 

South Royalton, Vt. 

110 H. H. Hall 
Milo 103 H. H. Hall 

Brunswick A X A House 

Howland Balentine Hall 

Bangor 32 Fern Street, Bangor 
Eastport ATA House 

Orono 72 Main Street 

Ellsworth Falls Park Street 

Orono 8 Juniper Street 

Orono 8 Juniper Street 



272 



CATALOG OF STUDENTS 



Whited, Ernest Alfred, Me. 
Whiteside, Frederick William, Ee. 
Whitney, Bernice Marion, He. 
Whitney, Sumner Prince, Me. 
Wilder, Carroll Deane, Ag. 
Willard, Fred Spear, Arts 
Willett, Orson Bither, Ee. 
Williams, Doris Elaine, Arts 
Williams, Leroy Gleason, Ee. 
Wood, Carleton Pratt, Ch. Eng. 
Wood, Matthew Spear, Eng. 
Woodcock, Raymond Frank, Eng. 
Woodman, Roger French, Fy. 
Worth, Harold Hinkley, Ch. Eng. 

Wray, Ruth Arline, Arts 



Bridgewater 212 Oak Hall 

Orono 38 Oak Street 

Thomaston Balentine Hall 

Friendship 80 Mill Street 

Washburn 411 H. H. Hall 

South Portland 2 N House 

East Corinth 36 Grove Street 

Vinalhaven Balentine Hall 

South Union 1 Middle Street 

Kingfield 410 H. H. Hall 

South Portland 35 Park Street 

Wilton $ H K House 

Plymouth, N. H. ATI] House 
Bangor 

R. D. 4, Ohio Street, Bangor 
Brewer Mt. Vernon House 



COLLEGE OF LAW SENIORS 



Baldwin, Dudley 
Bridgham, Wade Lawrence 

Brown, Cecil Earl 

Maine 
Chapman, Clyde Raymond 

Bowdoin College, 1912 
Corridon, John Henry 
Donahue, Paul Edwin, A. B. 

Bowdoin ; Harvard Law 

School 
Dufficy, Edward Charles 

Maine 
Ford, Pearley Harvey 

Bates 
Gallagher, James Augustine 
Harmon, Erald 

Haskell, Herbert Vaughn 



Cherryfield 

253 Union Street, Bangor 
Bridgton 

148 Kenduskeag Avenue, Bangor 
Norway The Colonial, Bangor 

Fairfield New Wilson, Bangor 

Portland 84 Cedar Street, Bangor 
Portland The Lowder, Bangor 



Rumford 20 Fifth Street, Bangor 

Mechanic Falls 

25 Brimmer Street, Brewer 
Bangor 34 Elm Street, Bangor 
Westbrook \ 

101 Sanford Street, Bangor 
Lincoln 103 Pine Street, Bangor 



273 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Hollis, Harold William 

Hooker, Earl Dewey 
Hurley, Harold William 

Maine 
Keating, Frederick Augustine 

Maine 
Kelleher, Michael Clarence, Jr. 

Libby, Harry Cummings 
Miles, Adelbert Laroy 

Morse, Mayland Herbert 
Rudman, Abraham Moses 



Lisbon Falls 

25 Fifth Street, Bangor 
Bangor The Colonial, Bangor 
Wareham, Mass. 

25 Fifth Street, Bangor 

Bangor 84 Cedar Street, Bangor 

Westerly, R. L 

61 Fourth Street, Bangor 
Portland 108 Fourth Street, Bangor 
Ellsworth Falls 

253 Union Street, Bangor 

Anson 253 Union Street, Bangor 

Bangor 26 Market Street, Bangor 



Blair, Wellington Arthur 

Maine 
Cohen, Robert 
Couette, Ralph Hubert 



Cowan, Frank Irving, A. B. 

Bowdoin, 1913 
Curran, James Joseph, A. B. 

St. Mary's, 1913 
Decker, Ernest Raymond 

Middlebury 
DeWolfe, James Codman 
Fitzgerald, Charles Manning 

Georgetown Law School 
Fitzgerald, John Cogan 

Bowdoin 
Fortier, Albert James 

Hale, George Lester 

Maine 
Jones, Walter Converse 

Maine 



LAW JUNIORS 

Waterville 10 Cedar Street, Bangor 



Bangor 305 Essex Street, Bangor 
Bangor 

10 Second Street Avenue, Bangor 
Bangor 9 South Street, Bangor 



Portland 62 High Street, Bangor 

Bangor 16 Sanford Street, Bangor 

Portland The Colonial, Bangor 
Bath 21 Sanford Street, Bangor 

Bath 21 Sanford Street, Bangor 

Livermore Falls 

103 Pine Street, Bangor 
Belfast 84 Cedar Street, Bangor 

Portland 8 Union Place, Bangor 



274 



CATALOG OF STUDENTS 



Jordan, John Frederick 
Katz, Hyman 

Southern College of Medicine 
Levin, Reuben 

Cornell 
Levenson, George Sidney 

Loring, Fred Milton, A. B. 

Bates, 1910 
McGrath, William Joseph 

Maine 
Marcou, Napolean Alphonse 

Preti, Frank Peter 

Maine 
Quimby, Robert Sinclair 
Vancore, Dixon Frederick 



Bangor 143 Grove Street, Bangor 
Bangor 291 Pine Street, Bangor 
and Surgery 
Manchester Depot, Vt. 

93 Elm Street, Bangor 
Dorchester, Mass. 

60 Court Street, Bangor 
Auburn 16 Sanford Street, Bangor 

Bangor 76 Court Street, Bangor 

Waterville 

21 Sanford Street, Bangor 
Portland 

Phi Eta Kappa House, Orono 
West Hampton, N. H. Y. M. C. A. 
Colebrook, N. H. 

10 Cedar Street, Bangor 



FIRST YEAR 



Brown, Clarence Arthur, A. B. 

Bowdoin, 1914 
Cohn, Abraham David George 

Drapeau, Eudore Alphonse, A. B. 

Bowdoin, 1916 
Gilpatrick, Verner Elisha 

Maine 
Godfrey, Noel Davis 

Maine 
Hayes, Harold Merrill, A. B. 

Bowdoin, 1914 
Isaacson, Benjamin 

Needham, Stanlty Francis 

Maine 
Nulty, William Bridgham, A. B. 

Bowdoin, 1910 



Portland 25 Fifth Street, Bangor 

New York City 

130 Essex Street, Bangor 
Brunswick 

114 Sanford Street, Bangor 
Orono 14 Bennoch Street, Orono 

South Lubec 

8 Union Place, Bangor 
F oxer oft 101 Union Street, Brewer 

Le wist on 

327 Pine Street, Bangor 
Old Town 

316 Center Street, Old Town 
Lisbon Falls 

25 Fifth Street. Bangor 



275 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Sherman, Allen, A. B. 

Dartmouth, 1915, Harvard 

Law School 
Wood, Henry Gerard, A. B. 

Bowdoin, 1916 



New Bedford, Mass, 

The Colonial, Bangor 

Gouldsboro 

320 Hammond Street, Bangor 



SPECIALS IN THE COLLEGE OF LAW 



Blais, Frank Philip 

Crowley, Wallace Edgar 
Drew, Harold Ray 

Eames, Clayton Earle 

Colby 
Flanagan, William Joseph 

St. Anselm's 
Gillin, George Henry 
Harrisburg, Alexander 

Hurley, Charles William 
Lane, Orlando Hook 
Mahoney, Edmund Patrick 
Marquis, Joseph Augustin 

Colby 
Morris, Abraham 
Payson, Walter Mayo 

Colby 
Sanborn, Arthur Raymond 

Shaw, Norman 

Siddall, Cecil James 
Stevens, Norris Frederick 
Urbano, Angelo Joseph 
Walsh, Francis Allinson 
Ware, John 
Colby 
Watson, James Bennett 
Webber, Ralph Albert 



Portland 

22 Sanford Street, Bangor 
Bangor 61 Fourth Street, Bangor 
Kennebunkport 

60 Court Street, Bangor 
North Anson 

48 Summer Street, Bangor 
Ellsworth 313 State Street, Bangor 

Bangor 119 Pine Street, Bangor 
Lewis ton 

130 Essex Street, Bangor 
Ellsworth, 29 Union St., Ellsworth 
Topsfield 10 Cedar Street, Bangor 
Portland 84 Cedar Street, Bangor 
Waterville 

21 Sanford Street, Bangor 
Bangor 36 Essex Street, Bangor 
South Hope 

108 Fourth Street, Bangor 
Island Falls 

10 Second Street Avenue, Bangor 
Prospect Harbor 

320 Hammond Street, Bangor 
Sanford Sanford 

Rockland 25 Fifth Street, Bangor 
Portland 59 Essex Street, Bangor 
Bangor 210 Essex Street, Bangor 
Waterville 

67 Cedar Street, Bangor 
Bangor The Colonial, Bangor 
Rockland 10 Cedar Street, Bangor 



276 



CATALOG OF STUDENTS 



SPECIALS IN THE COLLEGES AT ORONO 



Bean, Harold John, Ch. 
Curtis, Walter Edson, Bl. 
Dodd, Clarence John, Ee. 
Gilman, Elva, Ped. 
Hamlin, Emery Leroy, Ce. 
Handley, Hale Wright, Ag. 
Hickson, Eugene Francis, Ch. Eng. 
Kartwell, Walter Traver, Dh. 
Hull, Edward Knevals, Arts 
Johnson, Paul Thorsten, Ag. 
Joyce, Alvah Barbour, Es. 
King, Alfred Rollins, Me. 
Leavitt, Frank Leonard, Ce. 
Leighton, Arthur Whiting, Ag. 
Lemont, Herbert Randall, Fy. 
Little, Nellie Ursula, Fr. 
Longley, George Stephen, Ch. Eng. 
Mann, Josephine Estelle, He. 
Marsh, Raeburne Lyndon, Dh. 
Moore, Harry Albert, Md. 

Murer, Oscar Andreas, Ch. 
McCann, Mary Agnes, Arts 

Newdick, Erlon Lincoln, Ag. 
Newell, George Esty, Ht. 
Pattee, Karl Monroe, Ee. 
Potter, Raymond Page, Fy. 
Reed, Annie Hersey, Arts 
Roberts, Marguerite Copeland, Arts 
Schweitzer, Lewis, Ch. 
Scott, Harold Guy Don, Arts 
Smith, Edith Whitney, Ed. 
Tracy, Olive Frances, Arts 
Whitney, Raymond Lee, Fy. 
Willey, Walter Francis, Ag. 
Williams, Elmer Briry, Ed. 
Woods, Audrey Freeman, He. 



Old Town 105 Oak Hall 

Stillwater Stillwater 

Mexico College Street 

South Portland Balentine Hall 

Portland 88 Main Street 

Camden 56 Park Street 

Upper Troy, N. Y. Mill Street 

Bangor 74 Fern Street, Bangor 
Orono University Inn 

Bar Harbor North Main Street 
Portland 2 K House 

Fairfield B II House 

Turner College Street 

Abington, Mass University Inn 
Bath 2 A E House 

Portland Mt. Vernon House 

Lewiston B II House 

Orono 40 Main Street 

Bangor 401 H. H, Hall 

Bangor 

27 Autumn Street, Bangor 
Rumford 55 Bennoch Street 

Bangor 

61 Second Street, Bangor 
Sanford K 2 House 

Houlton $ K 2 House 

South Liming ton 39 Mill Street 
Old Town College Street 

Orono 36 College Street 

Dexter Balentine Hall 

Brooklyn, N. Y . College Street 
Old Town Old Town 

Gorham Bennoch Street 

Winter Harbor Balentine Hall 

North Anson 307 H. H. Hall 

Rents Hill 2 AE House 

Old Town Old Town 

Orono Main Street 



277 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



TWO-YEAR PHARMACY 



SECOND YEAR 



Berridge, Frank Edward 
Clark, Roger Hopkins 
Dorfman, Samuel 
Mackenzie, Gerald Leroy 
Simpson, Helen Antoinette 
Smargonsky, Isaac 



East Lynn, Mass. 

Warren 

Portland 

West Franklin 

Waterville 

Ashland 



College Street 
Pierce Street 
111 H. H. Hall 
405 Oak Hall 
Balentine Hall 
$ E n House 



FIRST YEAR 



Barbour, Bentley Lawrence 
Burgoyne, William Joseph 
Davis, Jacob Joseph 
Delano, Freeland Derward 
Emerson, Clarence Lee 
Hopkins, Sylvester Bartlett 
Morgan, Clifford Milton 
Perkins, Frederic Eugene 
Weymouth, Leon Joseph 



Rockland 
Fort Kent 
Bangor 
Vinalhaven 
Brewer 
East Lynn, 
Caribou 
Bangor 17 
Gorham 



Peters Street 

Stillwater 

* E n House 

Peters Street 

Brewer 

Mass. 6 X House 

403 H. H. Hall 

Fourth Street, Bangor 

108 Oak Hall 



TWO-YEAR HOME ECONOMICS 





SECOND YEAR 




Gardner, Ruth Electa 


Westfield, 


Mass. Balentine Hall 


Hamor, Gladys Leone 


Bangor 






22 Kenduskeag Avenue, Bangor 


Little, Aleida Elizabeth 


Portland 


Mt. Vernon House 


McCann, Mary Elizabeth 


Bangor 


74 Birch Street, Bangor 


Mooney, Maria Augusta 


Orono 


105 Main Street 


Osier, Bertha 


Orono 


56 Forest Avenue 


Pretto, Theresa Helen 


Bangor 


50 Pine Street, Bangor 


Sawyer, Lula Frances 


Brewer 


Mt. Vernon House 



SCHOOL COURSE IN AGRICULTURE 



Adams, Carl Frank 
Allen, Herbert Marsena 



SECOND YEAR 



Kennebunkport Stillwater 

Bangor 36 Charles Street, Bangor 



278 



CATALOG OF STUDENTS 



Benson, Alton Howard 
Beverage, Arthur Walter 
Bickford, Harry Elmer 
Brown, Earl Stanley 
Elliott, Robert Stephen Clark 
Hagstrom, Conrad Walfrid 
Jacobs, Franklin Oscar 
Jameson, Foster Davis 
Kyes, Ralph Granville 
Marshall, Mason Henry 
Parker, Stanley Bradbury 
Pendleton, Raymond Fowles 
Pratt, Charles Lewis 
Sullivan, Daniel Cleveland 
Thomas, Fletcher Alton 
Thompson, Arthur Wright 
Weeks, Fred Warren 
Weeks, Harold Cass 
Worthley, Clifford Nelson 
Wright, William Trott 



Kennebunkport Stillwater 

Pulpit Harbor 109 H. H. Hall 

Searsmont Garland Street, Bangor 
Presque Isle College Street 

Centerville. Mass. 109 H. H. Hall 
Oxford, Mass. Grove Street 

West Berlin, Mass 306 Oak Hall 
Friendship 80 Mill Street 

North Jay 109 H. H. Hall 

Topsham Bennoch Street 

South Leeds 101 H. H. Hall 

Camden Campus 

Yarmouthville North Main Street 
Lubec 20 Grove Street 

Leeds Center 310 H. H. Hall 

Portland 305 Oak Hall 

Comville A X A House 

Marlboro, Mass. 203 H. H. Hall 
Strong 203 H. H. Hall 

Woolwich North Main Street 



FIRST YEAR 



Allen, Herbert Moody 
Barbour, Lester Prentiss 
Bessey, Gerald Heald 
Bishop, George Lowell 
Bridges, Henry Styles 
Call, Lester Carol 
County, Timothy William 
Damon, Lerone Mellen 
Day, Irving Hall 
Goodwin, Elmer Mills 
Johonnett, Aubrey Herman 

LaPoint, Edmund Robert 
Lindgren, Hilmer Harold 
Nichols, Wadsworth 
Nickerson, Fred Levett 
Raymond, Harlan Warren 



Wilton 209 H. H. Hall 

Brewer R. F. D. 7, Bangor 

South Paris 207 Oak Hall 

Presque Isle Stillwater 

West Pembroke 29 Pond Street 
Carmel 36 Grove Street 

Saco A T fi House 

Buckfield 209 Oak Hall 

Stowe Bennoch Street 

Eliot College Street 

Hampden Highlands 

Hampden Highlands 
Orono 29 Forest Avenue 

Bangor Garland Street, Bangor 
Buxton 104 Oak Hall 

Bangor 628 Union Street, Bangor 
Westbrook 104 Oak Hall 



279 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Redman, Arlo Lee 
Sawyer, Charlie Alexander 
Tomlinson, Bertram 
Wallingford, John Gowell 
Warren, Ralph Edward 
Waterman, Erland Hancock 
Wheeler, Ralph Jones 



Belfast 

Thomaston 

Liver more Falls 

Auburn 

Lisbon Falls 

Buckfield 

Brewer 



College Street 

Mill Street 

College Street 

$ H K House 

Stillwater 

207 Oak Hall 

Brewer 



SUMMER TERM 



Adams, George Joseph 


Orono 


Adams, James Abraham, B. A. 


Orono 


Maine, 1915 




Allen, Lloyd Carroll, A. B. 


Auburn 


Bates, 1914 




Allen, William Henry 


Brownville Junction 


Andrews, Myra Higgins 


Exeter 


Bain, Herbert Soley, A. B. 


Orono 


Wesleyan, 1912 




Barker, Corinne Maude 


Bangor 


Bartlett, Robert Whitney 


Westfield, Mass. 


Beach, Dorothea 


Bangor 


Berman, Harry 


Lewiston 


Blaisdell, Catherine 


Winter port 


Blaisdell, Cora May 


Winter port 


Blanding, Lora Elizabeth 


Bangor 


Boyd, Elmer Trickey, A. B., A. M. 


Bangor 


Bowdoin, 1895, Harvard, 1901 




Brackett, Altie Franklin 


Berwick 


Brown, Clifford 


Portland 


Bryant, Herbert Lorenzo, A. B. 


Round Pond 


Bowdoin, 1912 




Buncke, Harry Jacob, C. E. 


Whitestone, New Yi 


Columbia, 1915 




Butters, Arthur Erwin, B. A. 


Old Town 


Maine, 1916 




Callahan, Mildred Laurel 


Island Falls 


Carleton, Edward Frazier, B. A. 


Parsonsfield 


Maine, 1912 





280 



CATALOG OF STUDENTS 



Chase, Martha Durgin, A. B. 

Boston University, 1906 
Clark, Joseph Farwell 
Clarke, George Clarence, B. A. 

Maine, 1913 
Cleveland, Orestes 
Cobb, Harold Payson, A. B. 

Wesleyan, 1913 
Corning, Clarence Hamilton 
Crockett, Bessie Lee 
Crowell, Alice Maud 
Davis, Manley Webster 
Dennis, Eleanor Bessie 
Dodge, Richard Boulsby 
Dole, Margaret 

Drummond, Marjorie Beverly 
Dunnack, Smith 
Edmunds, Charles Stover 
Estabrooke, Carl Bertrand, B. A., 

1916, M. A. Maine, 1912 
Falvey, John Michael 
Farnham, Walter Elwood 
Fenderson, Kendrick Elwell 
Fletcher, Robert Kemble 
Fowler, Enna Wilbur 
Frost, Ida Ethel 
Grant, Eva Leonore 
Gray, Ernest Linwood 
Greenacre, Genevieve May 
Greenleaf, Florence Evelyn 
Goodier, Edna Amy 
Hall, Earl Stanley 
Hamlin, Golda Gushel 
Hamlin, Joseph Wilbur 
Harmon, Frank Lorenzo 
Haskell, Horace Bray 
Haskell, Marian Elizabeth 
Haskell, Ralph Everett 
Haskell, Weston Bradford 
Herrick, Carleton Sewall 



Portland 

Cambridge, Mass, 
Kent's Hill 

Albany, N. Y. 
Searsmont 

Bangor 

Washington, D. C. 

Boston, Mass. 

Guilford 

Bangor 

Machias 

Bangor 

Orono 

Bangor 

Bangor 

Boston, Mass. 

Orono 

Orono 

Gorham 

Orono 

Portland 

Bangor 

Bangor 

South Berwick 

Bangor 

Auburn 

Saco 

Springfield, Mass. 

Woodland 

Woodland 

Corinna 

Ellsworth 

Ellsworth 

Ellsworth 

Auburn 

South Brewer 



281 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Hewes, Vergn Edmontine 


Saco 


Hodgkins, Lois 


Bangor 


Holmes, Adrian Emery 


Buckfield 


Hooper, Henry Stinson 


Orono 


Hopkins, Adele Cecilia 


Old Town 


Hurley, Alice Mary 


Frankfort 


Hurley, Catherine Agnes 


Ellsworth 


Hutchinson, Edward Blake 


Buckfield 


Ingersoll, Dorothy Ruth 


Orono 


Jack, George Edwin, A. B. 


Bozvdoinham 


Bates, 1910 




Johnson, Carl Strong 


Easthampton, Mass. 


Jordan, Ruth 


Old Town 


Jordan, Marion Luella, B. A, 


Old Town 


Maine, 1914 




Keep, John Marcus 


North Conway, N. H. 


Kent, Paul Glen 


Fitchburg, Mass. 


Kiernan, John Henry 


Wareham, Mass. 


Kimball, Lester Willis 


Cliftondale, Mass. 


King, Harold Louis 


Orono 


Lackey, Mary 


Washington, D. C. 


Lawler, Mark Robinson 


Southwest Harbor 


Leecock, John Thomas 


North And over, Mass. 


Lucas, John Wilbur 


Portland 


Lunt, Lucy Barton 


South Brewer 


Magee, John Henry 


Bangor 


Miles, Elsie Estelle, A. B. 


Patten 


Boston University, 1909 




Monroe, John Reed 


Monroe 


Mooers, Horatio Tobey 


Skowhegan 


Mooney, Maria Augusta 


Orono 


Mullen, Charles Emerson 


Bangor 


McCann, Mary Agnes 


Bangor 


Macdonald, Irving Clifford 


Portland 


McSkimmon, Donald 


Brookline, Mass. 


Noddin, Erne, A. B. 


Kent's Hill 


Maine Wesleyan Seminary and Female College, 1909 


Norcross, Esther Kathryn 


Old Town 


O'Bryan, Evelyn May 


Boston, Mass. 


Orcutt, Hollis 


Franklin 



282 



CATALOG OF STUDENTS 



Paul, George Boss, Ph. C. 


York Beach 


Maine, 1914 




Pearson, Fred Almore 


Buckfield 


Partridge, Clara Estelle 


Petnaquid Beach 


Partridge, Jennie Velma 


Pemaquid Beach 


Perkins, Lena Georgia 


Oxford 


Perry, Mildred Geneva 


R. F. D. 7, Bangor 


Phillips, Ray Eugene 


Newport 


Phinney, Chester Squire, B. A. 


Pawtucket, R. I. 


Maine, 1911 




Post, Lawrence Leicester 


Alfred 


Pretto, Theresa Helena 


Bangor 


Rao, Ramanathapur Sitarama, B. Sc, 


Bangalore, India 


University of Bombay, 1913 




Rhind, Ethel Knowlton 


Stillwater 


Ring, Arthur Andrews 


Orono 


Robinson, Arthur James 


Bangor 


Russell, George Frederick 


Methuen, Mass. 


Savage, Arno Charles 


Bangor 


Schenck, Frederic Van Nydick 


Millinocket 


Simms, Henry Swain 


Gorham 


Smith, Oscar Samuel, B. A. 


Bangor 


Maine, 1913 




Snow, Charles Augustus 


Stockton Springs 


Stetson, Robert Stanwood 


Brunswick 


Stinson, Parker Burroughs, A. B. 


Wise asset 


Bates, 1915 




St. Onge, Arthur Amos, B. A. 




Maine, 1914 


Foxcroft 


Stoughton, Richard 


Montague, Mass. 


Swasey, Guy Henry, A. B. 


Lincoln 


Bates, 1914 




Tarbox, James Obadiah, A. B. 


Newcastle 


Bowdoin, 1914 




Thurlow, Myra Dunn 


Stillwater 


Toner, Ernest Leroy, B. S. 


Orono 


Maine, 1907 




Towne, Mary Elizabeth 


Brookline, Mass. 


Trimm, Harriet Mae 


East Corinth 


Urann, Eugene Harrison 


East Sullivan 



283 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Urann, Florice Clark East Sullivan 

Violette, Genevieve Augusta Milford 

Wadleigh, Verna Kezar Falls 

Wardwell, Simon Murray Auburn 

Watkins, Herbert Everett Portland 

Whitcher, George Edward Berlin, N. H. 

Whitcomb, Charles Floyd New Sharon 

White, Mattie Exeter 

Whittier, Charles LeRoy Stillwater 

Williams, Harriet Robbins South Union 

Winter, Clifford Maurice Kingfield 

Wood, Margaret Allen Bar Harbor 



284 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



FACULTY 



President 


1 


Professors 


43 


Associate Professors 


14 


Assistant Professors 


20 


County Agricultural Agents 


12 


Instructors 


54 


Lecturers 


8 


Assistants 


4 


Miscellaneous 


8 


Total 


164 


College of Agriculture 


44 


College of Arts and Sciences 


49 


Agricultural Experiment Station 


17 


College of Law 


11 


College of Technology 


35 


Officers common to all Colleges 


8 


Total 


164 


STUDENTS 




Graduate Students 


42 


Seniors 


166 


Juniors 


192 


Sophomores 


231 


Freshmen 


389 


Specials 


36 



285 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



College of Law, Seniors 20 

Juniors 22 

First Year 11 

Specials 22 75 



Two- Year Curriculum in Pharmacy 

First Year 9 

Second Year 6 15 

Two- Year Course in Home Economics 

Second Year 8 

(No students admitted after 1915) 

School Course in Agriculture 

First Year 23 

Second year 22 45 

Summer Term 136 



Total (omitting duplicates 59) 



CLASSIFICATION BY RESIDENCE 



1276 



Maine, by counties : 

Androscoggin 67 

Aroostook 60 

Cumberland 163 

Franklin 32 

Hancock 57 

Kennebec 59 

Knox 41 

Lincoln 27 

Oxford 35 

Penobscot 298 

Piscataquis 33 

Sagadahoc 17 

Somerset 39 

Waldo 30 

Washington 45 

York 78 1081 

286 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

District of Columbia 

Indiana 

Massachusetts 

New Hampshire 

New York 

Rhode Island 

Vermont 

China 

India 



1 

1 

20 

2 

2 

128 

24 

10 

3 

2 

1 

1 



195 



ORGANIZATION BY COLLEGES 



1276 



Graduate students 
College of Agriculture 
College of Arts and Sciences 
College of Law 
College of Technology 



42 
325 
399 

75 
435 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREES 



1276 



Graduate Students 
College of Agriculture 
College of Arts and Sciences 
College of Law 
College of Technology 



35 
259 
310 

53 
424 



287 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



The following students registered in short courses given in the 
College of Agriculture, January to February, 1916. 



Name 



Course 



Home Address 



Donald Bachelder 

Lewis C. Berry 
Arthur T. Craig 
Harold E. Dean 
Frank E. Eastman 
Mrs. Frank Emerson 
G. Franklin Frost 
Mrs. Maurice H. Gray 
Mrs. Eleanor M. Hall 
Myron L. Holmon 
Ceylon M. Kimball 
Albert B. Kettell 
Arthur Levasseur 

Simon J. Luce 
Galen M. Low 
Philip M. Plummer 
William A. Rich 
A. Robertson 
Herbert A Sanborn 

Everett E. Tilton 
Peter J. Vincent 



General Agriculture 

28 Congress St., Bangor 
Dairying Livermore Falls 

Poultry Husbandry Fairfield 

General Agriculture Lincolnville 
Poultry Husbandry Winthrop 

Dairying Enfield 

General Agriculture Dennysville 
Dairying Old Town 

Poultry Husbandry New Sweden 
Dairying Dixfield 

Dairying Bethel 

Dairying Holden 

General Agriculture 

335 Congress St., Portland 
Dairying Farmington 

Horticulture 695 High St., Bath 

Dairying Portland 

General Agriculture Bangor 

Poultry Husbandry North Jay 

Poultry Husbandry 

14 Federal St., Salem, Mass. 
General Agriculture Albion 

Poultry Husbandry 

R. F. D. #7, Skowhegan 



288 



INDEX 



INDEX 



Administration, officers of... 

Admiralty — 

Admission _ — 

Advanced standing— 

Agricultural Chemistry 

Agricul tural Clubs 



Agricultural Engineering ~ _.. 

Agricultural Experiment Station.. 
Counci 1 - 



Agriculture, College of 

Agronomy courses 

curriculum 

Alpha Zeta 

Alternating Currents _ 

Alumni Advisory Council 

Alumni Associations 



Animal Husbandry courses- 
curriculum 



Animal Industry courses «... 

curricula 



PAGE 

7 
171 
44 
44 
89 
79 
90 
220 
6 
63 
81 
68 
33 
206 
229 
229 
83 
58 
83 
68 



Calendar _ 

Central heating plant.. 



Certificate, admission by 

Certificates in Agriculture 

Certificates awarded 

Chemical Engineering curricu- 

1 um „ 

Chemistry courses 

curriculum 

entrance _ 

Christian Association 



Appointments _ .. 232 

Archeology ~ - 



Civil Engineering courses 

curriculum 

Clubs „...„ 

Commencement exercises, 1916 

Committees of the Faculty 

Correspondence courses in 

Agricul ture „ 

Criminal Law 

Crops 

Curricula _ „ _ „ 



Aroostook Farm 

Art Collection „ .. 

Arts and Sciences, College of... 

Associations _ - - 

Astronomy „ 

Athletic Field _ „ 

Athletics _ 

B acteriology 

Bibliography 

Biological Chemistry 

Biology courses 

curriculum 

entrance _ 

Botany _ _.. 



Buildings and equipment 

Business 



143 
222 
110 

31 
100 

31 
112 

26 
218 

86 
113 

89 
113 

71 

59 
113 

23 
118 



Agri cul ture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry _ 

Animal Industry 

Arts and Sciences „ 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Chemical Engineering ..... 

Civil Engineering _. 

Dairy Husbandry 

Electrical Engineering 

Forestry 

Home Economics ~ 

Horticul ture _ „. 

Law _ 

Mechanical Engineering.... 
Pharmacy 



PAGE 
3 
26 
45 
76 
243 

177 
192 
171 

59 

32 
200 
181 

31 
236 

21 

78 
171 
82 
61 
66 
68 
68 
68 
105 
71 
171 
177 
181 
69 
183 
72 
73 
70 
170 
185 
188 



289 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



PAGE 

Dairy Husbandry courses 83 

curriculum 69 

Debate _ 163 

Degrees 35 

advanced 36 

Degrees conferred, 1916 238 

Demonstration work in 

Agriculture 78 

Deposits 40 

Dormitories 39 

Drawing 212 

Economics 117 

Education 121 

Electrical Engineering courses 205 

curriculum 183 

English 127 

entrance 49 

English Literature 130 

Entomology _ 114 

Entrance 44 

Establishment of the University.... 22 

Evidence 171 

Examinations, entrance 44 

Expenses 38 

Experiment Station 220 

Extension Schools in Agriculture 79 

Extension work in Agriculture 77 

Faculty. Agriculture 63 

Arts and Sciences 100 

Experiment Station 220 

Law 168 

Technology 174 

University 8 

Farmers' Week 77 

Farm Management 90 

Fees 38 

laboratory 39 

Floriculture 98 

Forestry Courses 92 

curriculum 72 

rnity houses 26 

French 135 

entrance 52 

-ical collection 30 

Geology 89 

German 139 

entrance 54 



PAGE 

Gothic 141 

Graduation, requirements for 103 

Greek 143 

entrance 57 

Heat Engineering _ 210 

Herbarium 29 

Highmoor Farm „ 222 

Highway Engineering __ 204 

Histology _ 114 

History 145 

entrance 58 

Home Economics courses 95 

curriculum 73 

special courses 75 

Honorary societies 33 

Honors 35 

conferred, 1916 233 

Horticulture courses „ 97 

curriculum 70 

Hydraulics 201 

Industrial Chemistry 196 

Infirmary 26 

Insurance 118 

Italian _ 167 

Journalism _ 129 

curriculum 106 

Kidder scholarship _ 41 

Kittredge loan fund 41 

Laboratory charges 39 

Landscape Gardening _ 98 

Latin 148 

entrance 56 

Law, College of 168 

preparation for 106 

Lecture Courses, Agriculture 78 

Arts and Sciences _ 104 

Libraries 27 

Loans 41 

Logic 157 

Lumbering 94 

Machine Design 209 

Machine Work „ _... 208 

Maine Masque 32 

Ma j or Subj ect 102 

Materia Medica 213 

Mathematics 151 

entrance 58 



290 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Mechanical Engineering courses.... 208 

curriculum 185 

Mechanics 212 

Mechanics and Drawing 212 

Medicine, preparation for 107 

Menorah Association „ 32 

Meteorology 159 

Military courses 216 

Museums „ 29 

Music 156 

Observatory 26 

Organic Chemistry _ 193 

Organization of the University 61 

Organizations 31 

Pedagogy, degree in 106 

Pharmacy courses 213 

curricula 188 

Phi Kappa Phi 33 

members 232 

Philosophy 157 

Physical Chemistry 195 

Physical Culture 218 

Physics 158 

entrance _ 60 

Physiology 113 

Political Economy 117 

Pomology 97 

Poultry Husbandry courses 85 

curriculum 70 

Power House 27 

Prescriptions „ 215 

Pnzes 41 

awarded 1916 235 

Psychology „ 157 

Public Speaking 162 

Publications 33, 176, 223 

Radio-activity 161 

Railroad Engineering 204 

Reading Room 28 

Regiment organization 234 

Regulations of the University 34 

Requirements for admission 46 

for graduation 103 

Rhetoric 128 

Rooms 39 

Rule of Conduct 34 

Sanskrit 150 



PAGE 

Scholarship honors _ 35 

Scholarships 41 

School Course in Agriculture 75 

Short Winter Courses in 

Agriculture _ 75 

Silviculture 94 

Societies _ 31 

Sociology 118 

Soils 81 

Spanish 165 

entrance 56 

Spanish and Italian 165 

State certificates for teachers 104 

Student expenses 38 

Students, list of 245 

classification of 285 

number of 286 

Studies, quota of _ 35 

Structures 202 

Summer Term 225 

expenses 227 

Surveying 200 

Tau Beta Pi 33 

Technology, College of 174 

Experiment Station 176 

faculty 174 

Telephone Engineering 207 

Theology, preparation for 105 

Theses 38 

Torts 173 

Trustees, Board of 5 

Tuition charges 38 



University, history of 22 

buildings and equipment.... 23 

bulletins 33 

establishment 22 

location 23 

organization _ 61 

Veterinary Science _ 87 

Winter courses _ 76 

Wireless Telegraphy 207 

Woodworking 208 

Women, admission of 44 

Worship, public 34 

Young Women's Christian As- 
sociation „... 33 

Zoology 113 

collections 29 



291 



THE MAINE BULLETIN 



VOL. XX 



NOVEMBER,, JPT7 ■ Mo. 3 



CATALOG 



OF THE 



University of Maine 




1917-1918 



Published monthly during the academic year by the University 
Entered at the Orono post office as second class matter 



35 



35 



135 



KEY TO MAP 

1 Athletic Field 

2 Grand Stand 

3 Beta Theta Pi House 

4 Tennis Courts 

5 Pumping Station 

6 Plumber's House 

7 Oak Hall 

8 Wingate Hall 

9 Fernald Hall 
lu Power House 
U Alumni Hall 

12 University Press 

13 Coburn Hall 

14 President's House 

15 Observatory 

16 Horticultural Building 

17 Holmes Hall 

18 Home Economics 

Laboratory 

19 Stable 

20 Dairy 

21 Barns 

22 Farm Superintendent's 

House 

23 Professor's House 

24 Kappa Sigma House 

25 Mt. Vernon House 

26 Phi Gamma Delta House 

27 B. O. & O. Waiting 
Rooms 

28 Lord Hall 

29 Phi Epsilon Pi House 

30 Phi Kappa Sigma House 

31 Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
House 

32 Store House 

33 Infirmary 

34 Library 

35 Farm Buildings 

36 Heating Plant 

37 Winslow Hall 
M Theta Chi House 

I Phi Eta Kappa House 
t Stock Judging Pavilion 

41 Delta Tau Delta House 

42 Hannibal Hamlin Hall 

43 Professors' Houses 

44 Estabrooke Hs 

45 Balentine Hall 

46 Baseball Grand 
Stand 

47 Aubert Hall 

48 Sigma Nu House 

49 Carpenter Shop 




^E 



KEY TO MAP 



3 Beta Theta Pi House 

4 Tenuis Courts 

> Pumping station 
6 Plumber's House 
- Oak Hall 
Wingate Hall 



13 Coburn Hall 

14 President's House 

15 Observatory 

Ti Hortieulturul P.uiMmg 
7 Holmes Hall 
Home Economics 
Laboratory 



House 

23 Professor's House 

24 Kappa Sigma House 

25 Mt. Vernon House 

26 Phi Gamma Delta House 

27 B. 0. & 0. Waiting 

Rooms 

28 Lord Hall 

2!) Phi Epsilon Pi House 
30 Phi Kappa Sigma House 
81 Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

32 Store House 

33 Infirmary 

34 Library 

35 Farm Buildings 
:-;i, Heating Plant 
:<~ Winslow Hall 

,'i Theta Chi House 
' Phi Eta Kappa Hoi 
i Stock Judging Pavilion 
Delta Tau Delta House 
Hannibal Hamlin Hall 

Houses 
Kst.abrooke Hall 
41 P.alentine Hall 
Kj Baseball Grand 

Stand 
4V Aubert Hall 

Sigma Nu House 




CATALOG OF THE 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



1917-1918 




ORONO, MAINE 



THE UNIVERSITY PRESS 

ORONO, MAINE 

1917 



1917 


1918 


1918 


1919 


JULY 


JANUARY 


JULY 


JANUARY 


8 M T W T F 8 


S M T W T F 8 


S M T W T F 8 


8 M T W T F 8 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


__ 1 2 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 ._ 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 8 


S M T W T F 8 


S M T W T F 8 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 ._ 


12 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 


12 3 
"4 "5 "6 "7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 __ 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 8 


S M T W T F 8 


S M T W T F 8 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 


12 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 


1 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 _ 




OCTOBER 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


8 M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 8 


8 M T W T F S 


.-123456 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


__ 1 2 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 _ 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 8 


S M T W T F 8 


8 M T W T F S 


12 3 

"4 "5 ~6 "7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 .- 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 ._ 


12 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


12 3 
"4 ~5 ~6 ~7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


8 M T W T F 8 


8 M T W T F 8 


8 M T W T F 8 


8 M T W T F S 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 


12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 











Calendar 



FALL SEMESTER, 1917 

October 5-9, Arrearage examinations; entrance 

examinations 
October 10, Wednesday, Registration, 8.00 A. M.— 5.00 P.M. 

October 11, Thursday, Registration, 8.00 A. M.— 5.00 P.M. 

First chapel, 11.00 A. M. 
November 29, Thursday, Thanksgiving Day, a holiday 

December 21, Friday, Christmas recess begins, 12.00 M. 

December 31, Monday, Christmas recess ends, 12.00 M. 



February 



8, Friday, 



1918 

Fall semester ends, 5.05 P. M. 



SPRING SEMESTER, 1918 



February 


9, 


Saturday, 


February 


11, 


Monday, 


February 


22, 


Friday, 


April 


19, 


Friday, 


May 


30, 


Thursday, 


June 


5-8, 




June 


9, 


Sunday, 


June 


10, 


Monday, 


June 


11, 


Tuesday, 


June 


12, 


Wednesday, 



Registration 

Spring semester begins, 8.00 A. M. 

Washington's Birthday, a holiday 

Patriot's Day, a holiday 

Memorial Day, a holiday 

Entrance examinations 

Baccalaureate address 

Class Day 

Meeting of Board of Trustees 

Commencement, 9.30 A. M. 



SUMMER TERM 

June 24, Monday, Summer Term begins, 8.00 A. M. 

August 2, Friday, Summer Term ends 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



September 13-17, 



FALL SEMESTER, 1918 



September 


18, 


Wednesday, 


September 


19, 


Thursday, 


November 


28, 


Thursday, 


December 


18, 


Wednesday, 



Arrearage examinations ; entrance 

examinations 
Registration, 8.00 A. M. 
Registration; first chapel, 11.00 A.M. 
Thanksgiving Day, a holiday 
Christmas recess begins, 12.00 M. 



1919 



January 
January 



2, 
31, 



Thursday, 
Friday, 



Christmas recess ends, 12.00 M. 
Fall semester ends, 5.05 P. M. 



February 


1, 


February 


3, 


June 


11, 



SPRING SEMESTER, 1919 

Saturday, Registration 

Monday, Spring semester begins, 8 A. M. 

Wednesday, Commencement 



The University will probably postpone the time of opening in 1918 if 
the war conditions continue. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Board of Trustees 



Hon. Samuel Wadsworth Gould, B. S., President Skowhegan 

Term expires April 16, 1921 
Edwin James Haskell, B. S. Westbrook 

Term expires December 31, 1919 
Freeland Jones, LL.B. Bangor 

Term expires May 31, 1918 
Charles Swan Bickford, B. S. Belfast 

Term expires April 13, 1919 
Hon. William Henry Looney, B. A. Portland 

Term expires September 10, 1921 
Hon. Frederick Hastings Strickland Bangor 

Term expires April 28, 1922 
Thomas Vincent Doherty, A. B., Clerk Houlton 

Term expires May 7, 1920 
Hon. Frank Edward Guernsey Dexter 

Term expires May 31, 1924 
Executive Committee: Gould, Jones, and Strickland 
Farm Committee: Jones, Doherty, and Guernsey 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

Maine Agricultural Experiment 
Station Council 



Robert Judson Aley, Ph. D., LL. D. President 

Charles Dayton Woods, Sc. D. Secretary 

Freeland Jones, LL. B., Bangor ) Committee 

Thomas Vincent Doherty, A. B., Houlton v of 

Frank Edward Guernsey, Dexter \ Trustees 

Leon Stephen Merrill, M. D., Orono 

Dean of the College of Agriculture 
John Albert Roberts, M. A. Norway 

Eugene Harvey Libby, Auburn State Grange 

Wilson Hiram Conant, Buckfield State Pomological Society 

Frank Samuel Adams, Bowdoinham State Dairymen's Association 

William George Hunton, Cherryfield 

Maine Seed Improvement Association 
Leonard Clement Holston, Cornish 

Maine Livestock Breeders' Association 
James Monroe Bartlett, M. S. 
Edith Marion Patch, Ph. D. 
Warner Jackson Morse, Ph. D. 
Raymond Pearl, Ph. D. 
Herman Herbert Hanson, M. S. 
Frank Macy Surface, Ph. D. 



Members 

of the 

Station Staff 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



Officers of Administration 



OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Robert Judson Aley, President. 2A Alumni Hall, Campus 
James Norris Hart, Dean. 5 Alumni Hall, 130 College Street 
Charles John Dunn, Treasurer. 4 Alumni Hall, 51 Bennoch Street 
James Adrian Gannett, Registrar. 2 Alumni Hall, 167 Main Street 

OF THE COLLEGES AND EXPERIMENT STATION 

Leon Stephen Merrill, Dean of the College of Agriculture. 16 Wins- 
low Hall, Campus 

James Stacy Stevens, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. 200 
Aubert Hall, 175 Main Street 

Charles Dayton Woods, Director of the Maine Agricultural Experiment 
Station. Holmes Hall, 133 Main Street 

William Emanuel Walz, Dean of the College of Law. D Stewart Hall, 
8 Fifth Street, Bangor 

Harold Sherburne Boardman, Dean of the College of Technology. 12 
Wingate Hall, 68 Main Street 

OF THE DEPARTMENTS 

Agronomy. Professor Simmons, 26 Winslow Hall, 4 Gilbert Street 
Animal Industry. Professor Corbett, 14 Winslow Hall, Campus 
Bacteriology and Veterinary Science. Professor Russell, 13 Wins- 
low Hall, 132 College Street 
Biological and Agricultural Chemistry. Professor Merrill, 15 Wins- 
low Hall, 178 Main Street 
Biology. Professor Chrysler, 24 Coburn Hall, 370 College Street 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

♦Biology (Agricultural Experiment Station). Professor Pearl, 

Holmes Hall, 166 College Street 
Chemistry. Professor Easley, 211 Aubert Hall, 162 College Street 
Chemistry (Agricultural Experiment Station). Professor Bartlett, 

Holmes Hall, 148 College Street 
Civil Engineering. Professor Brown, 28 Wingate Hall, 129 Main Street 
Economics and Sociology. Professor Stephens, 10 Coburn Hall, 158 

College Street 
Education. President Aley, 2A Alumni Hall, Campus 
Electrical Engineering. Professor Barrows, 21 Lord Hall, 36 Myrtle 

Street 
English. Professor Stevens, 200 Aubert Hall, 175 Main Street 
Entomology (Agricultural Experiment Station). Professor Patch, 

Holmes Hall, College Street 
Farm Management. Professor Simmons, 26 Winslow Hall, 4 Gilbert 

Street 
Forestry. Professor Briscoe, 24 Winslow Hall, 380 College Street 
French. Professor Segall, 14 Fernald Hall, 7 Mill Street 
Geology. Professor Merrill, 15 Winslow Hall, 178 Main Street 
German. Professor Thompson, 22 Fernald Hall, 180 Main Street 
Greek Civilization. Professor Huddilston, 28 Library, 193 Main Street 
History. Professor Colvin, 11 Coburn Hall, University Inn 
Home Economics. Professor Freeman, 4 The Maples, University Inn 
Horticulture. Professor B. S. Brown, 32 Winslow Hall, 44 Forest 

Avenue 
Latin. Professor Chase, 15 Wingate Hall, 143 Main Street 
Law. Professor Walz, D Stewart Hall, 8 Fifth Street, Bangor 
Mathematics and Astronomy. Professor Hart, 5 Alumni Hall, 130 

College Street 
Mechanical Engineering. Professor Sweetser, 20 Lord Hall, 184 Main 

Street 
Mechanics and Drawing. Professor Weston, 15 Wingate Hall, 356 

College Street 



♦In government service. On leave of absence without pay 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



Military Science. Major Lang, 9 Alumni Hall, University Inn 
Music. Director Sprague, 30 Coburn Hall, 217 Union Street, Bangor 
Pharmacy. Professor Jarrett, 321 Aubert Hall, 36 Forest Avenue 
Philosophy. Professor Craig, 23 Wingate Hall, 32 College Street 
Plant Pathology (Agricultural Experiment Station). Professor 

Morse, Holmes Hall, 51 North Main Street 
Physics. Professor Stevens, 200 Aubert Hall, 175 Main Street 
Poultry Husbandry. Professor Corbett, 14 Winslow Hall, Campus 
Public Speaking. Professor Daggett, 5 Estabrooke Hall, 36 College 

Street 
Spanish and Italian. Professor Raggio, 11 Fernald Hall, 180 Main 

Street 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



•Faculty of Instruction and Investigation 



Robert Judson Aley, President and Acting Head of the Department of 
Education. 

B. S., Valparaiso, 1882 ; A. B., Indiana, 1888 ; A. M., 1890 ; Ph. D., 

Pennsylvania, 1897; LL. D., Franklin, 1909; Pennsylvania, 1917 

James Monroe Bartlett, Chemist in the Agricultural Experiment Station 

B. S., Maine, 1880; M. S., 1883 
Lucius Herbert Merrill, Professor of Biological and Agricultural 
Chemistry. 

B. S., Maine, 1883; Sc. D., 1908 
James Norris Hart, Dean of the University and Professor of Mathe- 
matics and Astronomy. 

B. C. E, Maine, 1885; C. E., 1890; M. S., Chicago, 1897; Sc. D., 
Maine, 1908 
Fremont Lincoln Russell, Professor of Bacteriology and Veterinary 
Science. 

B. S., Maine, 1885; V. S., New York College of Veterinary 
Surgeons, 1886 
James Stacy Stevens, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Pro- 
fessor of Physics, and Acting Head of the Department of English. 
B. S., Rochester, 1885; M. S., 1888, and Syracuse, 1889; LL. D., 
Rochester, 1907 
Charles Dayton Woods, Director of the Agricultural Experiment 
Station. 

B. S., Wesleyan, 1880 ; Sc. D., Maine, 1905 
John Homer Huddilston, Professor of Greek Civilization. 

A. B., Baldwin, 1890 and Harvard, 1893 ; Ph. D., Munich, 1897 
William Emanuel Walz, Dean of the College of Law and Professor of 
Law. 

A. B., Northwestern College, 1880; A. M., 1882; LL. B., Har- 
vard, 1889; Litt. D., Bowdoin, 1911 



♦Arranged in groups in order of seniority of appointment 

10 



FACULTY 



Jacob Bernard Segall, Professor of French. 

B. S. and B. L., Yassy, 1884; Ph. D., Columbia, 1893 
Harold Sherburne Boardman, Dean of the College of Technology and 

Professor and Head of the Department of Civil Engineering. 
B. C. E., Maine, 1895; C E., 1898 
George Davis Chase, Professor of Latin. 

A. B, Harvard, 1889; A. M., 1895; Ph. D., 1897 
Caroline Colvin, Professor of History. 

A. B., Indiana, 1893; Ph. D., Pennsylvania, 1901 

Warner Jackson Morse, Plant Pathologist in the Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station. 

B. S., Vermont, 1898; M. S., 1903; Ph. D., Wisconsin, 1912 
Charles Partridge Weston, Professor of Mechanics and Drawing. 

B. C. E., Maine, 1896; C. E., 1899; A. M, Columbia, 1902 
♦Raymond Pearl, Biologist in the Agricultural Experiment Station. 

A. B., Dartmouth, 1899; Ph. D., Michigan, 1902 
Charles Barto Brown, Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Ph. B., Yale, 1894; C. E., 1896 
Wallace Craig, Professor of Philosophy. 

B. S., Illinois, 1898; M. S., 1901; Ph. D., Chicago, 1908 
Garrett William Thompson, Professor of German. 

A. B., Amherst, 1888; A. M., 1891; Ph. D., Pennsylvania, 1907 
Guy Andrew Thompson, Professor of English Literature. 

A. B., Illinois, 1898, and Harvard, 1900; A. M., 1901; Ph. D., Chi- 
cago, 1912 

Windsor Pratt Daggett, Professor of Public Speaking. 
Ph. B., Brown, 1902 

Mintin Asbury Chrysler, Professor of Biology. 

B. A., Toronto, 1894; Ph. D., Chicago, 1904 
John Manvers Briscoe, Professor of Forestry. 

M. F., Yale, 1909 
Leon Stephen Merrill, Dean of the College of Agriculture and Director 
of Agricultural Extension Service. 
M. D., Bowdoin, 1889 



*In government service. On leave of absence without pay 



11 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



George Edward Simmons, Professor of Agronomy. 

B. S., Ohio Northern, 1902; M. S., 1905; B. Sc, Ohio State, 1909 
George Ware Stephens, Professor of Economics and Sociology. 

Ph. B., Iowa Wesleyan, 1904; M. A., Wisconsin, 1907; Ph. D., 1911 
William Edward Barrows, Jr., Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

B. S., Maine, 1902; E. E., 1908 
Bliss S Brown, Professor of Horticulture. 

B. S., Michigan Agricultural College, 1903; M. S., California, 1911 
Edith Marion Patch, Entomologist in the Agricultural Experiment 

Station. 

B. S., Minnesota, 1901; M. S., Maine, 1910; Ph. D., Cornell, 1911 
♦Frank Macy Surface, Biologist in the Agricultural Experiment Station. 

A. B., Ohio State, 1904; A. M., 1905; Ph. D., Pennsylvania, 1907 
Lamert Seymour Corbett, Professor of Animal Industry. 

B. Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1909; M. S., State Uni- 
versity of Kentucky, 1913 

Andrew Paul Raggio, Professor of Spanish and Italian. 

B. A., Texas, 1896; A. M., Harvard, 1902; Ph. D., 1904 
Frances Rowland Freeman, Professor of Home Economics. 

B. Sc, Ohio State, 1910; M. Sc, 1911 
fRoY Franklin Richardson, Professor of Education. 

A. B., Kansas State Normal College, 1909; Ph. D., Clark, 1913 
William Jordan Sweetser, Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

S. B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1901 
Herman Herbert Hanson, Chemist in the Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion. 

B. S., Pennsylvania State College, 1902; M. S., Maine, 1906 
Charles Wilson Easley, Professor of Chemistry. 

A. B., Dickinson, 1897; A. M., 1890; Ph. D., Clark, 1908 
William Ambrose Jarrett, Professor of Pharmacy. 

Pharm. D., Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 1913 
Clarence Webster Peabody, Professor of Law. 

A. B., Bowdoin, 1893; LL. B., Harvard, 1896 



♦In government service. On leave of absence without pay 
fOn leave of absence without pay 



12 



FACULTY 



♦William James Young, Director of Athletics and Professor of Physical 

Culture. 

B. P. E., International Y. M. C A. College, 1907; M. D., Penn- 
sylvania, 1911 
fHoRACE Meek Hickam, Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

Major, Signal Corps, Aviation Section, U. S. Army 
Franklin Runyan Lang, Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

Major, United States Army; A. B., Oskaloosa, 1894; LL. B., Detroit, 

1904; A. M., Columbia, 1915; Ph. D., 1916; LL. M., 1917; Sc. D. 

(in Jurisprudence), New York University, 1917 



Leon Elmer Woodman, Associate Professor of Physics. 

A. B., Dartmouth, 1899; A. M., 1902; Ph. D., Columbia, 1910 
James Adrian Gannett, Registrar. 

B. S., Maine, 1908 

JAlbert Theodore Childs, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

B. S., Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 1906; E. E., 1908 
*Harley Richard Willard, Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

A. B., Dartmouth, 1899; A. M., 1902, and Yale, 1910; Ph. D., 1912 
Archer Lewis Grover, Associate Professor of Drawing. 

B. M. E., Maine, 1889; B. S., 1902 

Alice Middleton Boring, Associate Professor of Zoology. 

A. B., Bryn Mawr, 1904; A. M., 1905; Ph. D.. 1910 
James McCluer Matthews, Associate Professor of Economics and 

Sociology. 

A. B., Park, 1903; A. M., Harvard, 1913 
Daniel Wilson Pearce, Associate Professor of Education. 

A. B., Indiana, 1910; A. M., 1912 

Carl Henry Lekberg, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

B. S, Maine, 1907 
1918 

Embert Hiram Sprague, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 
B. S., Dartmouth, 1900 



*In government service. On leave of absence without pay 
fCalled to active service, June, 1917 

$On leave of absence without pay, September 1, 1917, to September 1, 
1918 

13 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Carleton Whidden Eaton, Associate Professor of Forestry. 

A. B., Bowdoin, 1910; M. F., Yale, 1912 

Harold Scott Osler, Associate Professor of Agronomy. 

B. S., Muskingum, 1909, and Michigan Agricultural College, 1913 
♦Lowell Jacob Reed, Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

B. S., Maine, 1907; M. S., 1912; Ph. D., Pennsylvania, 1915 



Bartlett Brooks, Assistant Professor of Law. 

A. B., Harvard, 1899; LL. B., 1902 

Harry Newton Conser, Assistant Professor of Botany. 

B. S., Central Pennsylvania College, 1883; M. S., 1886; A. M., 
Harvard, 1908 

Alpheus Crosby Lyon, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

B. S., Maine, 1902; S. B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
1904; C. E., Maine, 1913 

♦Harry Woodbury Smith, Assistant Professor of Bacteriology. 
B. S., Maine, 1909 

♦Ralph Maynard Holmes, Assistant Professor of Physics. 
B. A., Maine, 1911; M. A, Wesleyan, 1913 

Franqois Joseph Kueny, Assistant Professor of French. 

B. es L., University of Paris, 1897; L. es L., Besangon, 1901 

Herbert Hannibal Hillegas, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineer- 
ing. 

B. S., Delaware, 1914 

fWiLLiAM Samuel Krebs, Assistant Professor of Economics and Sociol- 
ogy. 

A. B., Harvard, 1907; A. M., 1913 

Warren Whittemore Reed, Assistant Professor of English. 

A. B., Harvard, 1907; A. M., 1913 

♦Herman Pittee Sweetser, Assistant Professor of Horticulture. 

B. S., Maine, 1910 

Harry Gilbert Mitchell, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 
B. S., Dartmouth, 1910; A. M., Columbia, 1914 



♦In government service. On leave of absence without pay 
tOn leave of absence without pay 



14 



FACULTY 



♦Albert Ames Whitmore, Assistant Professor of History. 

B. S., Maine, 1906 
Dorothea Beach, Assistant Professor of Home Economics. 

B. S., Simmons, 1917 
Lester Frank Weeks, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

B. S., Colby, 1915 
Charles Howard Batchelder, Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

A. B., New Hampshire State College, 1913 ; M. S., 1915 
Bertrand French Brann, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

B. S., Maine, 1909; M. S., 1911 

Harold Walter Leavitt, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

B. S., Maine, 1915 
Myron Owen Tripp, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

A. B., Indiana, 1901; Ph. D., Columbia, 1909 
Adelbert Wells Sprague, Director of Music. 

B. S., Maine, 1905; A. M., Harvard, 1907 



Maurice Daniel Jones, Farm Management Demonstrator. 

B. S., Maine, 1912 
William Collins Monahan, Extension Instructor in Poultry Work. 

B. S., Maine, 1914 
Paul Wheeler Monohon, Assistant County Agent Leader. 

B. S., Maine, 1914 
Harold Joseph Shaw, County Agricultural Agent, Sagadahoc and 

Androscoggin Counties. 
Clarence Albert Day, County Agricultural Agent, Washington County. 
Arthur Lowell Deering, County Agricultural Agent, Kennebec County. 

B. S., Maine, 1912 
George Albert Yeaton, County Agricultural Agent, Oxford County. 
Albert Kinsman Gardner, County Agricultural Agent, Franklin County. 

B. S, Maine, 1910 
George Newton Worden, County Agricultural Agent, Hancock County. 

B. S., Maine, 1913 



*On leave of absence without pay 



15 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Joseph Henry Bodwell, County Agricultural Agent, Piscataquis County. 

B. S., Maine, 1915 
Roger Locke Gowell, County Agricultural Agent, Knox County. 

B. S., Maine, 1916 
Robert Marks Stiles, County Agricultural Agent, Somerset County. 
William Melvin Gray, County Agricultural Agent, York County. 

B. S., Maine, 1912 
Ralph Lord Smith, County Agricultural Agent, Cumberland, County. 
Richard Boulsby Dodge, County Agricultural Agent, Penobscot County. 

B. S., Maine, 1917 
John Leslie Scribner, County Agricultural Agent, Aroostook County. 

B. S., Maine, 1917 

Norman Sylvester Donahue, County Agricultural Agent, Waldo County. 
B. S., Maine, 1915 

Ralph Pike Mitchell, State Leader Boys' and Girls' Agricultural Club 
Work. 

Charles Edward Crossland, Assistant Leader Boys' Agricultural Club 
Work. 

B. S., Maine, 1917 

Alfreda Ellis, Assistant Leader Girls' Agricultural Club Work. 
B. S., Maine, 1917 

Catharine Norton Platts, Extension Instructor in Home Economics 
and State Leader Emergency Home Demonstration Project. 
S. B., Simmons, 1911 

Kathryn Taylor Gordon, Extension Instructor in Home Economics. 

S. B., Simmons, 1915 
Edward Watts Morton, Extension Instructor in Dairying. 

B. S., Maine, 1909 
Raymond Henry Fogler, Secretary to the Director of Extension Service. 

B. S., Maine, 1915 ; M. S., Princeton, 1917 

Emergency Extension Staff 

Harry Woodbury Smith, Assistant County Agent Leader. 
B. S., Maine, 1909 



16 



FACULTY 



Blynne Allen, Emergency District Demonstration Agent, Andros- 
coggin, Kennebec, and Somerset Counties. 

Roy Sawtelle Bacon, Emergency District Demonstration Agent, Cum- 
berland, Oxford, and York Counties. 
B. S., Maine, 1906 

Charles Leon Blackman, Assistant Emergency Demonstration Agent, 
Penobscot County. 

B. S., Maine, 1916; M. S., Iowa State, 1917 

Sydney Gurney Evans, Emergency County Agent, Lincoln County. 

John Harvey Philbrick, Assistant Emergency Demonstration Agent. 
B. S., Maine, 1915 

Ruby Irene Barker, Emergency Home Demonstration Agent, Somerset, 
Waldo, and Knox Counties. 

Lucy Thompson Dodge, Emergency Home Demonstration Agent, Penob- 
scot and Piscataquis Counties. 

Edith Flint, Emergency Home Demonstration Agent, Franklin, Andros- 
coggin, and Oxford Counties. 

Marion Estabrooke Hunt, Emergency Home Demonstration Agent and 
State Wide Worker. 
B. S., Maine, 1912 

Grace May Neagle, Urban Emergency Home Demonstration Agent, 
Portland. 

Eunice Hale Niles, Emergency Home Demonstration Agent, Aroostook 
County. 

Erma Lucile Royal, Emergency Home Demonstration Agent, Kennebec, 
Sagadahoc, and Lincoln Counties. 

Alice Blanche Webster, Emergency Home Demonstration Agent, Wash- 
ington and Hancock Counties. 
S. B., Simmons, 1911 



Everett Willard Davee, Instructor in Wood and Iron Work. 

Ernest Conant Cheswell, Instructor in Electrical Engineering. 

Roydon Lindsay Hammond, Seed Analyst and Photographer in the Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station. 

Elmer Robert Tobey, Assistant Chemist in the Maine Agricultural 
Experiment Station. 

B. S., Maine, 1911; M. S., 1917 

17 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



*John Rice Miner, Computer in the Agricultural Experiment Station. 

A. B., Michigan, 1913 

Jacob Zinn, Assistant Biologist in the Agricultural Experiment Station. 
Agr. D., Hochschule fur Bodenkultur, 1914 

Michael Shapovalov, Assistant Pathologist in the Maine Agricultural 
Experiment Station and Collaborator with the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture. 

M. S., Maine, 1913 

Glen Blaine Ramsey, Assistant Plant Pathologist in the Agricultural 
Experiment Station and Collaborator with the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture. 

A. B., Indiana, 1913; A. M., 1914 

Margaret June Kelley, Instructor in German. 

B. A., Maine, 1912; M. A., 1916 

Richard Theodore Muller, Instructor in .Horticulture. 

B. S., Cornell, 1916 
Oscar Milton Wilbur, Instructor in Animal Industry. 

B. S., Maine, 1915 
Llewellyn Morse Dorsey, Instructor in Animal Industry. 

B. S., Maine, 1916 
John Howard Perry, Assistant Chemist in the Agricultural Experiment 

Station. 

B. S., Maine, 1917 

Harold Louis King, Assistant Chemist in the Maine Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station. 

B. S., Maine, 1917 
John Whitmore Gowan, Assistant Biologist in the Maine Agricultural 
Experiment Station. 

B. S., Maine, 1914; M. S, 1915; Ph. D., Columbia, 1917 

Silvia Parker, Assistant Biologist in the Maine Agricultural Experiment 
Station. 

B. A., Mt. Holyoke, 1917 
James Appleby Dibblee, Instructor in English. 



*In government service. On leave of absence without pay 



18 



FACULTY 



Maynard Fred Jordan, Instructor in Mathematics. 

B. A., Maine, 1916 
Francis Thomas McCabe, Instructor in Mechanical Drawing. 
JoaquIn Mendez-Rivas, Instructor in Spanish. 

Bachiller, Escuela Nacional Preparatoria de la Cuidad de Mexico, 

1909; Abogado, Escuela Libre de Direcho de la Cuidad de Mexico, 

1913 
George Alvin Scott, Instructor in Physics. 

B. S., Wisconsin, 1902 
Quentin Weaver Stauffer, Instructor in Mathematics. 

Ph. B., Muhlenberg, 1913 
Walter Christopher Stone, Instructor in Chemistry. 

B. S., Maine, 1913 
Roy Frank Thomas, Instructor in Agriculture. 

B. S., Maine, 1917 
Samuel Vasconcelos, Instructor in Spanish. 

Bachiller, Escuela Nacional Preparatoria de la Cuidad de Mexico, 

1910; Abogado, Escuela Nacional de Jurisprudencia de Mexico, 1916 



May Ella Taft, Acting Librarian. 

B. A., Wellesley, 1908; S. B., Simmons, 1912 
Ethel Gertrude Wigmore, Assistant in the Library. 

A. B., Acadia, 1914 

Madeline Moore, Assistant in the Library. 

Charles Lindsay Stephenson, Assistant in Military Science and Tactics. 

B. S., Maine, 1917 

Harry Roy Perkins, Shop Assistant in Mechanical Engineering. 
Edward Murray, Assistant in Pharmacy. 
Paul DeCosta Bray, Assistant in Chemistry. 

B. S., Maine, 1914 
Elwood Irvin Clapp, Assistant in Chemistry. 

B. S., Maine, 1917 
Charles Harry White, Scientific Aid in the Agricultural Experiment 

Station. 

Ph. C, Maine, 1897 



19 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



Walter Edson Curtis, Scientific Aid in the Agricultural Experiment 
Station. 



Lucilius Alonzo Emery, Lecturer on Roman and Probate Law. 

A. B., Bowdoin College, 1861; A. M., 1864; LL. D., 1898 
Louis Carver Southard, Lecturer on Medico-Legal Relations. 

B. S., Maine, 1875; M. S., 1892; LL. D., 1904 
Edward Harward Blake, Lecturer on Admiralty. 

LL. B., Albany Law School, 1878 ; LL. D., Maine, 1910 
Isaac Watson Dyer, Lecturer on Federal Jurisdiction and Procedure, and 
on Private Corporations. 

A. B., Bowdoin, 1878 

John Rogers Mason, Lecturer in Bankruptcy Law. 

A. B., Harvard, 1869; A. M., LL. B., 1872 
William Bridgham Peirce, Lecturer on Common Law Pleading and 

Maine Practice. 

B. M. E., Maine, 1890 

Henry Burt Montague, Lecturer on Practice and History of Law. 

LL. B., Cornell, 1895 ; LL. M., Maine, 1910 
Lawrence Vivian Jones, Lecturer on Forestry Law. 

LL. B., Maine, 1910 
William David Fuller, Lecturer on School Administration. 

Ph. B., Wisconsin, 1910; A. M., Maine, 1917 



20 



FACULTY 

COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

Administration — The President and Deans 

Athletics — Grover, Gannett, Lyon, L. S. Merrill, Peabody, E. H. Sprague 

Auditing — L. H. Merrill, B. S. Brown, Lekberg, Grover 

Chapel — Barrows, Matthews, A. W. Sprague, Woodman 

Christian Association — Matthews, Daggett, Lekberg 

Employment — Gannett, Simons, Beach 

Graduate Study — Chase, Colvin, Corbett, Craig, Easley, L. H. Merrill, 
Morse, Raggio, Segall, Stephens, Walz, Woodman 

Health — Stephens, Freeman, Jarrett, Russell 

Honors — Chrysler,